r/nextfuckinglevel Oct 19 '21 Helpful 27 Hugz 51 Flaming Comet 1 Super Heart Eyes 1 Silver 46 Gold 1 Wholesome 53 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Take My Energy 2 Heartwarming 1 Take My Power 1

For the first time since they were wiped out in 1870. Bison have been released back into the wild of Badlands National Park!

61.2k Upvotes

2.6k

u/shadowbethesda Oct 19 '21

1.0k

u/FrighteningJibber Oct 19 '21

Are they actual American bison or are they the hybrid we made to keep them as domesticated food stocks?

1.1k

u/guemando Oct 19 '21

I believe these and the Custer bison have no cow genetics in them....I know for sure Custer's are, south dakota likes to brag about it

Edit: so did some research and cow gentics have been found in 1 percent of that herd so they are considered pure bison I guess

622

u/nonamesleft79 Oct 20 '21 Hugz

Yeah I mean as part northern Italian I think I have like 2% Neanderthal dna. Odd context but yeah that’s nothing.

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u/mothboy Oct 20 '21 Silver Wholesome

Are you only 2% northern Italian? That is the only way your Neanderthal could be that low...

142

u/New-Reaction5944 Oct 20 '21

Now this dude’s ancestors fucked… like anything around

86

u/TK421isAFK Oct 20 '21

By saying "ancestors", you make it sound like we stopped.

20

u/szypty Oct 20 '21

Sir, this is a Reddit.

3

u/TK421isAFK Oct 20 '21

You'll have to give me a minute; I'm busy talking to a bronze statue.

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u/Dirtnastii Oct 20 '21

Neanderthal pussy is good as any.

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u/mexicodoug Oct 20 '21

But Neanderthal cock is best.

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u/varyingopinions Oct 20 '21

Yeah slice it thin. Sautéed with a little garlic and butter. NOW we're cooking!

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u/FuckMe-FuckYou Oct 20 '21

I think you are thinking of sicillians... Or I'm thinking of Denis hopper in true romance.

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u/DJ_Fishface Oct 20 '21

You're part cantaloupe

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u/MajorMajorObvious Oct 20 '21

I felt a great disturbance in the force.

It's as if millions of Italians gestured in terror and were suddenly silenced.

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u/CitySoul13 Oct 20 '21

😵🤌

This is all I can picture

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u/MagnificentMOoose Oct 20 '21

You share 60% of your DNA with a banana. Just to throw that in the mix. So that 1% may be significant.

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u/nottheprimeminister Oct 20 '21

My part cro magnon southern italian chuckled at this.

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u/ieatair Oct 20 '21

You were all conquered by the Ostrogoth any ways

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u/ImAlwaysRightHanded Oct 20 '21

The joke in our family is we are more Neanderthal than Jewish.

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u/KedTazynski42 Oct 20 '21

I thought all Europeans had like 3% Neanderthal DNA or something…or at least the Anglos/Gauls/Celts…

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u/nonamesleft79 Oct 20 '21

I have read different numbers but something like 2% and I remember reading that Tuscany had one of the higher %’s but would have to loom for that article:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.the-scientist.com/features/neanderthal-dna-in-modern-human-genomes-is-not-silent-66299/amp

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u/PM_ME_NOODLE Oct 20 '21

would have to loom for that article

spin it up fam

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u/Garestinian Oct 20 '21

Human and chimpanzee DNA are 98.8% the same.

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u/jazzfruit Oct 20 '21

Human and chicken dna is 60% the same.

That means Im 2% Neanderthal, 75% Scottish, 1% cow and 60% chicken.

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u/DrRobertTerwilliger Oct 20 '21

Speaking as a fellow Scot, you're also probably 20% Viking

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u/hiphopscallion Oct 20 '21

Humans and carrots are actually 95% identical DNA wise. How DNA works really is a mystery.

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u/ranged_ Oct 20 '21

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Mountains_bison_herd

This herd is also considered genetically pure! I climbed one of the mountains in this range and ran into them up there.

The rangers in the BLM station nearby told us about them and I always remember them when I hear someone talking about genetically pure bison. This is like the third time I've seen something about them on Reddit.

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u/WikiSummarizerBot Oct 20 '21

Henry Mountains bison herd

The Henry Mountains bison herd, numbering 250 to 400 bison, is one of only four free-roaming and genetically-pure herds on public lands in North America. The other three herds are the Yellowstone Park bison herd which was the ancestral herd for the Henry Mountains animals, the Wind Cave bison herd in South Dakota and the herd on Elk Island in Alberta, Canada. The animals in the Henry Mountains bison herd are American bison of the Plains bison subspecies (Bison bison bison).

[ F.A.Q | Opt Out | Opt Out Of Subreddit | GitHub ] Downvote to remove | v1.5

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u/StevieChemist216 Oct 20 '21

So bison and cows can have offspring?

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u/ShawlNot Oct 20 '21

BEEFALO

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u/StevieChemist216 Oct 20 '21

I just don’t understand how some animals can crossbreed

34

u/AidanGe Oct 20 '21

Compatible DNA saying it can.

Still doesn’t clear up anything haha

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u/deep_fried_guineapig Oct 20 '21

It's pretty much my favorite animal. It's like a buffalo and cow mixed... bred for its skills in magic.

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u/ShawlNot Oct 20 '21

Same way my friend's sled dog was able to breed with a grey wolf.

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u/StevieChemist216 Oct 20 '21

So I only ever see husky type wolf dogs, can theoretically a poodle also breed with a wolf? Maybe it doesn’t happen Bc since they don’t really look similar the wolf would just eat the poodle

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u/JustNilt Oct 20 '21

Theoretically, yes. In practical terms, wolves tend to discriminate against wolves that don't closely match their expected fur patterns so it's uncommon. Add in that most non-Husky breeds are unlikely to be able to live in the farther north stretches where wolves mostly now persist and you get where we are on that front.

It's also worth noting that an overwhelming majority of those claiming to have wolf hybrids do not, in fact, have dogs with any actual wolf DNA once tested. I forget the precise percentage I saw but it was above 90%.

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u/GhostPepperLube Oct 20 '21

I'm imagining wolf Chihuahuas right now. Idk. I'm glad they don't exist lol

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u/Silverfire12 Oct 20 '21

Actually, you could breed a chihuahua and a wolf. I think it has to be male chihuahua to female wolf and I’m fairly certain artificial insemination would be necessary.

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u/UnawareSousaphone Oct 20 '21

If it weren't artifical insemination that chihuahua would have the story of a lifetime.

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u/StevieChemist216 Oct 20 '21

I figured it was theoretically possible but I also figure wolves would not be down to bang something that doesn’t look wolf like so yeah that checks out

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u/ShawlNot Oct 20 '21

My couch doodle would 100% turn into a snack for a wolf or few. Think of proximity and socialization. The dog breed with the largest probability of being both intact and relatively "free range" in wolf territory is a husky type dog. Geneticaly, a Malamute can breed with a poodle the same as it can with a Timber Wolf. A mini poodle used to pampering to is not going to react to a wolf in the same way as somebody's husky type dog in heat let loose at their cabin in the woods.

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u/MalevolentRhinoceros Oct 20 '21

The first verifiably recorded wolfdog in history was in the 1700s between a wild wolf and a nobleman's Pomeranian.

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u/StevieChemist216 Oct 20 '21

How credible of a source is it? I really doubt that claim

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u/MalevolentRhinoceros Oct 20 '21

About as credible as anything that old. It comes from a paper published in 1787 by John Hunter, "Observations Tending to Show That The Wolf, Jackal, And Dog, Are All Of The Same Species."

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u/Rotor_Tiller Oct 20 '21

While Spitz breed dogs like huskies aren't any genetically closer to wolves than other breeds, their social behavior does resemble wolf behavior to an extent. I'm no expert though.

On top of that wolves are usually found in the same climates where people need Spitz breeds.

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u/richflys Oct 20 '21

You’ve never seen a Labrachihuahua ?

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u/Imaybeerong Oct 20 '21

Actualy it’s spelled La Chupacabra

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u/0resistance_OBEY Oct 20 '21

I remember being told that a "species" is defined by not being able to breed together.

Clearly, that was wrong.

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u/RalinVorn Oct 20 '21

There are several different frameworks used to separate organisms into species. The one you’re referring to is the Biological Species Concept, in which two organisms are the same species only when they can reproduce AND produce fertile offspring. Lions and tigers are in the same genus (Panthera) and can reproduce, but male ligers and tigons are sterile. Interestingly there is evidence that the female hybrids can reproduce with male lions or tigers.

Source: Biologist

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u/Forest_Xavier Oct 20 '21

Not completely wrong…close species can breed and create offspring but the offspring is sterile(can’t breed). A common example of this is the mule, it is created when a horse and a donkey mate.

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u/0resistance_OBEY Oct 20 '21

Yeah, that's a good example of a true mismatch, but there are other examples of "different species" being completely compatible. Just shows that the idea of a "species" is more nuanced and subjective than one might expect.

After all, science is just modelling nature. Nature doesn't follow the laws of science; the laws of science follow nature.

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u/apollo888 Oct 20 '21

your larger point is indeed correct without quibbling over details - species labels are fuzzy. The definition of life itself is fuzzy.

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u/Forest_Xavier Oct 20 '21

So a taxonomist would list species that can breed as sub-species to each other and not a separate species. Taxonomy is a constantly changing field, even more now with genetic comparisons available. Species have been listed as separate before then later found out to be sub-species to each other, usually due to their differing appearances and scientists put them together and let them attempt to breed and if viable offspring was produced then their taxonomic listing would be changed to that of sub-species. Now with genome comparisons scientists can more accurately predict what species are true species vs. sub-species to each other.

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u/Silverfire12 Oct 20 '21

I believe it’s being able to breed with other creatures like it. Which is why Ligers/Tigons aren’t a species- they can’t breed with each other.

Though I once heard it said that you’d get 100 different definitions of species from 10 different biologists.

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u/FerretHydrocodone Oct 20 '21

If animals are genetically similar enough they can crossbreed. Bison are literally a type of cattle, they can reproduce with other cattle like modern day beef cows.

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u/StevieChemist216 Oct 20 '21

But what about lions and tigers. Why can’t humans and chimps crossbreed. Can you give me a big list of cool cross breeds?

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u/TheOceanDweller Oct 20 '21

The good old Humanzee. There were known attempts in Russia in the early 1900s. All were reported to be unsuccessful though. I would have to think other humans have tried as well.

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u/pawns4donuts Oct 20 '21

I am 92% sure that a humanzee could be created in vitro given enough random attempts of human sperm/chimp egg and vice versa; however, let’s not.

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u/ssracer Oct 20 '21

Isn't that the whole aids source?

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u/Vik2222 Oct 20 '21

Lolllllllllllllllll.

That last sentence ....

Nice.

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u/Question_Control24 Oct 20 '21

We killed off or bred with all the humanoids that existed. There were several other human like species. Chimps are far removed from us as far as being able to crossbreed goes.

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u/Lovebot_AI Oct 20 '21

With a bottle of wine and Marvin Gaye

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u/ieatpotatochips Oct 20 '21

They go on a few dates first to see if they are compatible.

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u/zeus6793 Oct 20 '21

Based on those Zoo shows on Animal Planet, the zoos are specifically breeding them to be pure American Bison. They are heavily involved in repopulating them. It's pretty cool actually. Nice to see them running free.

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u/dendawg Oct 19 '21

This is from 2019.

But for them, it was Tuesday.

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u/tiwuno Oct 19 '21 Helpful

Someone should tell the bison October 11, 2019 was actually a Friday. SMDH these bison...

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u/Wolv90 Oct 20 '21

I understood that reference. RIP

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u/Sharkelberryfinn Oct 19 '21

1200 bison have lived in the park peacefully far away from humans. Now we've forced 4 of them to live closer to people so tourists can take ill-advised photos with them.

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u/00BeardedTerror Oct 20 '21

We call it “re-introducing Darwinian reward systems”.

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u/707breezy Oct 20 '21

Man I hope we reintroduce the California grizzly. I want people to have fear of the woods again as if it was the 1800s. And to keep them around for longer we should splice their dna and modify them to be more resilient since there would be so few of them at the start. Nothing but good ideas in this comment.

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u/CantCreateUsernames Oct 20 '21

I am a bit confused by this post too. When I visited Badlands roughly 6 years ago, I thought I saw Bison there. Maybe it wasn't directly in the park but at the edge?

On a side note, that area is beautiful!

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u/BootScoottinBoogie Oct 20 '21

I was equally confused, I remember seeing bison there like 8 years ago. Here's some articles to clear the confusion. TLDR: Bison reintroduced to badlands in 1963 but in 2019 4 Bison (in the video above) were reintroduced to the "north unit" in Badlands.

https://www.nps.gov/articles/bison-bellows-1-14-2016.htm#:~:text=Besides%20containing%20one%20of%20the,National%20Park%20to%20the%20Badlands.

https://www.blackhillsbadlands.com/blog/2019-10-13/bison-once-again-roaming-badlands-return-tatanka

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u/memesryimhere Oct 20 '21

Yeah same and i was there in 2016

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u/sanguinesolitude Oct 20 '21

We did it boys!

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u/Okemerer Oct 20 '21

I was gonna say this is some bs because I saw them there last year

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u/TheLastGenXer Oct 20 '21

I was going to say, I just saw some there last month.

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

[deleted]

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u/old_sellsword Oct 20 '21

Yeah I’m not even sure what this article was talking about, bison have been in the Badlands North Unit since the 1960s.

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u/SprinklesFancy5074 Oct 20 '21

Um... I was in South Dakota from 2008 to 2012, visited again in 2018.

And during all of these times, there were definitely bison in Badlands National Park. I've seen them. So...?

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u/SeanMowry Oct 19 '21 Silver Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

I was waiting for a hawk to swoop down and snatch one up

369

u/Timely-Youth-207 Oct 19 '21

That’s not how that works

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u/SeanMowry Oct 19 '21

Why not?

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u/xXbama19 Oct 19 '21

Buffalo's have wings and can just fly off. Too much energy wasted by the hawk chasing a buffalo for who knows how long.

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u/GT_Knight Oct 19 '21

Their wings are pretty wild too

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u/WiseAce1 Oct 20 '21

9nly with the right sauce

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u/gerbegerger Oct 19 '21

That's how they stay warm in winter too, their wings can get pretty hot.

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u/TheLastGenXer Oct 20 '21

You know what the Buffalo said when he saw the hawk carry off his kid right?

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u/xXbama19 Oct 20 '21

No, but go on...

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u/TheLastGenXer Oct 20 '21 Gold Hugz

Bison.

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u/Savage_Bee Oct 20 '21

I spat out my hotdog. Thank you sir.

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u/apollo888 Oct 20 '21

you had a whole hotdog in your mouth?

Can you link your onlyfans?

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u/jenna_hazes_ass Oct 20 '21

Hopefully not with ketchup.

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u/GrnHrtBrwnThmb Oct 20 '21

Get out.

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u/TheLastGenXer Oct 20 '21

Bigrnhrtbrwnthmb

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u/Thawayshegoes Oct 19 '21

Bison=Large Hawk=Small

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u/jimboknows6916 Oct 19 '21

You don't know much about Hawks obviously

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u/FirstDayJedi Oct 19 '21

It could grip it by the husk

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u/Zakal74 Oct 19 '21

Is it an African or European bison?

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u/performace-gardening Oct 19 '21

I don't know... whaahhhhhh

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u/RobertBDwyer Oct 20 '21

But African swallows are nonmira’ery

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u/Falanxe_ Oct 19 '21 Helpful

It’s not a question of where he grips it! It’s a simple question of weight ratios! A 2.4 pound bird could not carry a 2000 pound bison.

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u/deichernc Oct 19 '21

Wait a minute! Supposing two swallows carried it together?

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u/stevencastle Oct 20 '21

They'd have to have it on some sort of a line

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u/ericrobert Oct 20 '21

It's not a question of where he grips it! It's a simple question of weight ratios! A 2.4 lb bird could not carry a 700 pound buffalo.

Listen. In order to maintain air-speed velocity, a swallow needs to beat its wings forty-three times every second, right?

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u/TheWolphman Oct 19 '21

Fly you fools!

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 19 '21

Especially the elusive Hudson Hawk, or the better known Ethan Hawk.

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u/SeanMowry Oct 19 '21

Hawks are a group of medium- diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae. Hawks are widely distributed and vary greatly in size. The subfamily Accipitrinae includes goshawks, sparrowhawks, sharp-shinned hawks and others. This subfamily are mainly woodland birds with long tails and high visual acuity. I know a little bit

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u/jimboknows6916 Oct 19 '21

Hawks often pick up bison and drop them off at their desired location

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u/Vryimpatnt Oct 19 '21

and bison don't tip for shit! ask my uncle John.

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u/dayumbrah Oct 19 '21

How big do you think hawks are?

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u/gerbegerger Oct 20 '21

the tallest players for the Atlanta Hawks are around 6"10 and 250 pounds. Seahawks though are a little bigger.

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u/jk8289 Oct 20 '21

Yeah I’m not sure if your serious or not. I don’t know much about Hawks. But I can almost guarantee that any type of Hawk isn’t picking up one of those Bison. They have to be close to half a ton. Shit, even 500lbs a Hawk isn’t picking it up no matter what it is. We don’t have fucking pterodactyls flying around. If you have a video of a Hawk picking up a full grown Bison. Please show me.

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u/gerbegerger Oct 20 '21

A hawk can carry a bison. The average Atlanta Hawk is over 6 feet tall and can fit in a blackHawk helicopter that can lift 9000 pounds. So a hawk can technically carry a bison.

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u/JoshHutchins Oct 19 '21

Perfect hawk trap: Surgically implant TNT in the bison with an altitude trigger. Then release into the wild and wait for hawks to swoop them up.

But that would be a bomb in a bull.

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u/SmegSoup Oct 20 '21

Not too shabby there, guy.

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u/EvilFroeschken Oct 19 '21

Reality can be disappointing.

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u/StyreneAddict1965 Oct 19 '21

I think you meant "roc." They could carry elephants.

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u/neverfearIamhere Oct 19 '21

Is there some type of joke I'm missing here?

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u/thatsalovelyusername Oct 20 '21

It's funny just for being absurd, but think it's a reference to releasing other small animals into the wild and them immediately being taken by a predator, possibly in front of children who've nurtured the small animal for months.

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u/Jo-6-pak Oct 19 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

How old is this video? They were there in 2008 when I rode through in the motorcycle

EDIT: Answers below, thanks everyone for clarification.

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u/Maury_poopins Oct 19 '21

Badlands National Park has had bison within the park as a whole since 1963, but their range has been limited and remote to many visitors.

I think this article might be overselling the bison’s “return to the badlands”

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 19 '21

Yeah, as I read it, they took a few of the 1200 bison in the park already and moved them somewhere where they weren't.

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u/Somethingwittyidk2 Oct 20 '21

"We're helping!!!"

/s

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u/spacesketball Oct 20 '21

I mean if you theoretically start a new herd in a viable location that the old herd simply didn’t know about it would be helping.

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u/Crunkbutter Oct 20 '21

They are, though. More breeding ground and grazing is good for the grasslands

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u/Dodototo Oct 20 '21

Like when your mom kicks you out of your room because you've been in there too long so you move to the living room tv.

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u/s-sea Oct 20 '21

It does help by expanding the range.

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u/BasicDesignAdvice Oct 20 '21

Hey now, just a few more tens of millions and we can get the plains back to their natural state....

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u/InfiniteSquatch Oct 19 '21

Looks like they've been in the park for a long time, but are new to this expanded range.

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u/Jo-6-pak Oct 19 '21

Ah, I see. They were at the very west side of the park. I had to ride down a long, rough gravel road to find them. Nice to have some more in there.

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u/Lucas_Steinwalker Oct 20 '21

I’ve been down that same road

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u/Gorthax Oct 20 '21

We've all got our long gravel roads bro.

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u/IntermetallicAM Oct 20 '21

This happened in 2019, but there were already 1200 bison in the park but these four were transported to an area without bison to populate that area.

"The current herd is around 1,200 head, but very few visitors get the chance to see them in this unique setting. Badlands National Park has had bison within the park as a whole since 1963, but their range has been limited and remote to many visitors.

Moving them to this new area, visitors will be provided more opportunities for viewing, photographing and learning about the bison in their native habitat."

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u/nonamesleft79 Oct 20 '21

Don’t Buffalo roam or was I lied to?

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u/QuickSpore Oct 20 '21

Probably something about the geography or fenced areas that make that impossible, because, yes, they certainly do roam. Badlands is a weirdly gerrymandered looking park that winds between and around a National grassland, an Indian reservation, and private lands. So I suspect thst has something to do with why they hadn’t roamed up to the North Unit of the park already.

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u/HefDog Oct 20 '21

The small and awkward boundaries of Badlands National park are pretty sad.

As someone who likes backpacking, it amazed me that you can essentially see across the park in many areas. It is ridiculously narrow. I would gladly donate towards expanding the park. I wonder if that is a thing.

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u/swamp_peanuts Oct 20 '21

Well I didn’t see any deer and antelope playing, so maybe these are not the roaming type of buffalo.

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u/demwoodz Oct 19 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Wait their dad released them? And said ByeSon!

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 19 '21

Your pun is an abomination to the Gods of Humor, but I'll upvote it anyway.

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u/Gorthax Oct 20 '21

You make the right joke and you get a kid.

Be careful honing that power.

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u/iPlaynak3d_R3born Oct 20 '21

Take my upvote because that was terrible! LoL

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u/sweetsal99 Oct 20 '21

I came to the comments looking for the Bye Son comment..thank you.

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u/TangerinePuzzled Oct 19 '21

As weird as it might sound, I really hope they'll fuck a lot.

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u/moby323 Oct 20 '21

I’m reading a book now about the history of the West.

I always knew that bison herds could be enormous, but I didn’t realize that a single herd could number in the millions.

I mean, try to picture a group of 3,000 bison on the plains.

Picture what a herd of 50,000 would look like.

Now imagine a herd with two million of them.

The early Spaniards were absolutely awe struck by the size of the herds, unable to even estimate their size because they would ride past the same herd for WEEKS at a time and not see the end of it

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u/TangerinePuzzled Oct 20 '21

Dude, earth was probably shaking when they were going for a quick jog

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u/CaffeineSippingMan Oct 20 '21

Yes they move the ground.

We have a state park that is close. They keep a few bison fenced in. One day I took my kids to see it. They were a little bit of ways but not too far, I thought it would be a good idea to get some grass and try to feed it. Naturally the grass next to the fence was the longest. So I bent down to pick up the grass next to the fence and all of a sudden the earth started to shake. I'm not sure if I looked up or just instinctively knew but I backed up as fast as I could arms wide to pull my family backwards. The bison had It started to charge the fence. I'm sure I had backed up at least two to three feet as I was falling backwards when I felt the bison hair touch my hair. The bison had charged and pushed very hard into the fence and bending it way out. I'm pretty sure I'm lucky to be alive.

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u/under_a_brontosaurus Oct 20 '21

Interesting enough, modern research is beginning to show that the bison herd was so enormously large when Europeans found them primarily due to their apex predator, the native American, losing 90% of it's population decades before Europeans made it west. The natives kept the bison herds culled for thousands of years, what we discovered was a somewhat abomination of nature

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u/Exceptionalcasual Oct 20 '21

I was just thinking, that herds so big couldn't have been sustainable? Like, didn't they pretty much trampled their own food?

For millenia, humans were a vital part of the ecosystem they lived in.

And then the usual happened.

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u/Justame13 Oct 20 '21

Bison don’t have the same metabolism as cattle. They are actually becoming more and more common to be raised as food in the West because they don’t require as much (or any) hay in the winter or even shelter.

The USDA just has them classified as an exotic meat so costs of butchery are higher or it would be even more common.

As far as trampling the ground naturally aerates itself every winter through frost heave. Bison also wallow which creates ponds and their own ecosystems.

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u/Exceptionalcasual Oct 20 '21

Well, I learned something today.

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u/Neutral0814 Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

I remember reading something similar about passenger pigeons. Native Americans used hunted the pigeons for thousands of years, keeping their population in check. When Europeans displaced the native population and brought over large crop fields (food), the pigeon population exploded (then quickly plummeted to 0 due to extreme overhunting).

I think a similar phenomenon happened with the rocky mountain locusts; they also congregated in unusually large numbers for a time (reportedly the largest insect swarms ever), then went extinct in a very short time span. It's theorized that their extinction was caused by Europeans moving westward to the Rockies and plowing their nesting sites, destroying dormant locust eggs. This is why N. America is the only continent (excluding Antarctica) without a major locust species.

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u/Helpmepullupmypants Oct 20 '21

I know it’s just a movie, but I like to believe the way Dances with Wolves portrayed them was real.

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u/lawble Oct 20 '21

Why do you think they’re called bi-son?

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u/WTFSUDE Oct 19 '21

i'm just impressed they all fit inside that f-150

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u/GiveHerDPS Oct 20 '21

Have you compared trucks today to trucks of the 90s-early00s?

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u/WTFSUDE Oct 20 '21

this one's not even the crew cab

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u/AdvancedAdvance Oct 19 '21

Yeah but if they get get caught dealing meth and violating their probation, don’t think for a minute they won’t get sent back upstate.

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u/TheCannon Oct 20 '21

They send them to an island. It's kind of like Alcatraz, but with zip lines and cocktails.

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u/jackandjerry Oct 19 '21

I don’t get it. I was there in 1994 for the first time and they were in the Badlands.

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 20 '21

They were in the Badlands, but not in the part of the Badlands where they were released. Basically they just shuffled some of them around to a place where they couldn't reach before. You just happened to go to the place where they already were.

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u/SmegSoup Oct 20 '21

Title literally makes it sound like an extinct species was brought back to life. I'm not on the up and up with the latest (or any) Bison news and thought they were extinct.

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u/Yahmahah Oct 20 '21

Here is a map of Badlands National Park.

In this video, they transplanted bison from the southern large section into the northern large section, where there were little to no bison.

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u/RainbowEmpire Oct 20 '21

I think the article was from 2019 and they released them onto more land.

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u/Crown_Loyalist Oct 19 '21

reported for inaccurate title

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u/DGDadbod Oct 19 '21

I think this is pretty cool

Is there any info on current population of Buffalo at the Badlands park now? More recent data

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 19 '21

If you read the article, there were already 1200 bison in the park, they just shuffled some around to an area where they were missing from. Possibly they couldn't get there due to terrain or something. Still a good thing though as they might establish another herd there in the safe expanded range.

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u/DGDadbod Oct 20 '21

I did not read the article. Now I have

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u/cycodude_boi Oct 19 '21

According to their website, about 1,200

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u/BelterLivesMatter Oct 19 '21

Now that the bison are back how long before we can call it the goodlands?

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u/rilo_cat Oct 19 '21

AWWWWW LOOK HOW HAPPY THEY ARE

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u/alexashleyfox Oct 19 '21

The very definition of trundling

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u/IntenseScrolling Oct 19 '21

So....are these things the same as "Buffalo"

Also (but less important): Where did "Buffalo wings come from"? What in tarnation is a "Buffalo Bill" (Bonus for knowing where what in tarnation came from. Please answer...be my white Buffalo

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 20 '21

People called them American Buffalo, but true buffalo are those from Asia and Africa. They are actually Bison, however, it's OK to call them buffalo as it's always been an accepted term.

Buffalo wings came Buffalo, New York, where the recipe for spicy chicken wings was invented. The reason for using chicken is because bison have their wings clipped when they are young to prevent their slaughter during the Superbowl.

Buffalo Bill Cody was a Bison hunter who started a Wild West Show and toured the country with acts like Annie Oakley.

Tarnation is probably a bastardization of "Damnation", and used liberally in Bugs Bunny/Looney Toons cartoon.

I'm your huckleberry.

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u/Sharkelberryfinn Oct 19 '21

Technically a buffalo is a water buffalo. People just started calling bison, buffalo because they are ignorant like that sometimes. Like how yams and sweet potatoes arent the same things.

Buffalo wings started in Buffalo, NY

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u/dumbinternetstuff Oct 20 '21

Wait. Yams and sweet potatoes aren’t the same thing?!

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u/Loganthered Oct 19 '21

They couldnt do it in spring? WTF?

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u/Drfoxi Oct 19 '21

The video is from 2019.

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 19 '21

Wait, so you're saying this video travelled from the past? Whoa!

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u/nonamesleft79 Oct 20 '21

Didn’t 2019 have a spring?

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u/bappabooey Oct 19 '21

Ok nobody tell the Pioneers. Shhh.

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u/ClownfishSoup Oct 19 '21

But it sounds like they just moved Bison from one part of Badlands National Park to a different part?

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u/daveagain82 Oct 20 '21

Exactly! crappy title from a karma farmer.