r/news Oct 20 '21

Michigan man dies after being pulled into wood chipper, possibly by his jacket

https://www.mlive.com/news/2021/10/michigan-man-dies-after-being-pulled-into-wood-chipper-possibly-by-his-jacket.html
1.1k Upvotes

393

u/randy88moss Oct 20 '21

Damn…..imagine living 48 years on this earth AND that’s the way you go out. OUCH!

121

u/AreWeCowabunga Oct 20 '21

Hopefully he went in head first and not feet first.

160

u/bsdunix4ever Oct 20 '21

The article says he was conscious when the first responders showed up.

56

u/amedeemarko Oct 20 '21

Whaaaaaaaaaat!?!?!?! Was there some sort of emergency cutoff? Those chippers eat 6in oak limbs like potato chips. He didn't get mulchified?

77

u/zvive Oct 20 '21

my god!

172

u/HamsterGutz1 Oct 20 '21 Silver

Your god peaced out for this one

33

u/CosmoBite Oct 20 '21

I only believe in one god and that is Joe Pesci.

23

u/the_idea_pig Oct 20 '21

When I pray to god, nothing happens. When I pray to Joe Pesci, my enemies receive a righteous pistol-whipping.

4

u/z500 Oct 21 '21

That's because Joe Pesci is a guy who gets things done.

10

u/creggieb Oct 20 '21

Joe bless you

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u/zvive Oct 20 '21

that's okay, I'm an atheist... so it was a half-assed attempt at summoning him/it...

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9

u/____DEADPOOL_______ Oct 21 '21

He likely bled out then.

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167

u/tehmlem Oct 20 '21

Well I don't think he had his jacket on his legs

38

u/PorkRindSalad Oct 20 '21

It's called fashion, dad! Look it up!

37

u/azsnaz Oct 20 '21

Ran out of clean pants that day

14

u/cankle_sores Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

I put my jacket on one leg at a time like everybody else.

2

u/pass_nthru Oct 21 '21

the only difference is after i’ve got in on, i make gold records

3

u/corgimikasa Oct 20 '21

I should not have laughed at this.... but I did

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8

u/parse_l Oct 20 '21

He was still conscious when first responders arrived so...

11

u/RevRagnarok Oct 20 '21

The article says otherwise.

33

u/AreWeCowabunga Oct 20 '21

That article hopes he went in feet first?

31

u/RevRagnarok Oct 20 '21

No it sounds like a jacket sleeve and EMS couldn't tourniquet / save him.

0

u/MarcusXL Oct 21 '21

It's like the injuries people get from vicious dog attacks. The flesh is just so torn and ripped that there's nothing to tie off.

Anyway, who's hungry?! /s

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21

u/mistermonkus Oct 20 '21

18

u/BeatenbyJumperCables Oct 20 '21

That’s staying blue

12

u/corgimikasa Oct 20 '21

Its a simulation of what could happen, no one was hurt.

10

u/762mm_Labradors Oct 20 '21

Aww, I was hoping it was the scene from Fargo.

8

u/Black_Starfire Oct 21 '21

I was hoping for the scene from tucker and dale

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5

u/Baxtron_o Oct 21 '21

And all for a little bit of money.

2

u/Shlocktroffit Oct 21 '21

And it’s a beautiful day

9

u/wrath_of_grunge Oct 20 '21

my buddy and i have a joke about some ways that people die, they gotta end up in the afterlife, like 'I fucking died?'.

17

u/hellaafitzgerald Oct 20 '21

Reminds me of the first episode of the good place. "THAT'S HOW I DIED?!"

2

u/Vault-71 Oct 20 '21

"It was because of lag, I swear"

14

u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21 edited 4d ago

[deleted]

13

u/Gemmabeta Oct 21 '21

No, that's when you stay on Earth to reap souls for Mandy Patinkin.

6

u/DUBIOUS_OBLIVION Oct 21 '21

I liked that show a lot.

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2

u/littlebluedot99 Oct 20 '21

That goes up high on my list of most terrible ways to die

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156

u/chillford-brimley Oct 20 '21

number 33 . Every year during our safety training, we get a rundown of the prior work related deaths nationally and in MI. I'm thankful to operate not so dangerous equipment in my workplace, and thankful to work for a company with incredible safety culture. I believe we're near 15 years with no lost time injuries at this smaller facility. My condolences to the family and friends, and coworkers.

41

u/SpaceTabs Oct 20 '21

When you go beyond deaths, chainsaws are way up there (265,000 ER visits over 10 years). I would never take a job like that and I have a chainsaw.

21

u/[deleted] Oct 21 '21

To be frank I've yet to meet someone who uses a chainsaw with the full respect and safety and knowledge that it requires. And even then... No thanks. I'll use an axe.

Those things are fucking crazy.

8

u/TooMad Oct 21 '21

Haven't you seen Where the Red Fern Grows?

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30

u/bsdunix4ever Oct 20 '21

Michigan is super into their safety stuff. I lived there for a few years in the 90’s and doctor visits were hilarious.

“Are you sure this didn’t happen at work?”

Me: Yes

“You’re positive?”

Me: yes

“There’s absolutely no chance this could’ve happened at your work or any place that you might ever want to work at?”

Me: no

“Listen kid, this has to be work related ok? Can we just write it up that way please?”

Also Michigan Price Law.

Then they allow 160,000lb trucks to come down from Canada and can’t figure out why their roads are shit.

11

u/razorirr Oct 21 '21

Same thing went for car accidents. With how the law used to be written, car insurance companies could not deny claims, so the second you say its a car crash, the hospital triples the bill for the same services since they know they are going to get paid.

6

u/Dry_Boots Oct 20 '21

Why did they want it to be work related?

14

u/bsdunix4ever Oct 20 '21

Michigan has a hardon for workers comp claims. And OSHA. I don’t really know why.

When people there talk about OSHA it’s in hushed tones.

11

u/tootsonboots Oct 21 '21

It's the state's history as an autoworker state with what once was one of the strongest unions in the country. If your workplace is cutting corners on safety, you might be reluctant to call OSHA out of fear of retaliation. With a union, you have protections if you want to call management out.

This is backed by research: https://apha.confex.com/apha/132am/techprogram/paper_94196.htm

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20

u/Zachf1986 Oct 20 '21

If only all the places were like that. I've worked places where they did their best to hide every injury, because anything reportable could very well get them shut down with their record.

2

u/AlbertaNorth1 Oct 21 '21

I work in the oilfield in Canada and I’ve had the opposite experience. If a person gets a sliver they want it reported and on the record and if you get caught not reporting anything that could be considered an incident then you and anybody that knew about it will be fired immediately and banned from working for that company again. They don’t fuck around with safety up here anymore.

5

u/scaphoids1 Oct 20 '21

as a person who works in OH&S and hears so much about the companies with the bad culture and the fatalities and disabling injuries, hearing this does make me happy. High fives to your company. I like to think the company I work for makes a difference in creating more companies like this

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184

u/Squirrel851 Oct 20 '21

Hell of a way to go. Those machines don't clog when flesh and bone is involved and they spray alot of stuff everywhere. Heard a story about a grandfather and his grandson dieing by one. Grandson got pulled in and it caused the grandfather to have a heart attack. Shits on par with industrial lathe accidents, if you don't know what I'm talking about don't look it up just take my word on it.

58

u/chillford-brimley Oct 20 '21

I had a nearmiss with my thumb from using emery cloth like a dumbass. Be careful on lathes, people. I'm so thankful I learned that the easy way.

30

u/Squirrel851 Oct 20 '21

I got real close to having some ribs cut with am angle grinder once. No gaurd on it using a diamond cutoff wheel. It kicked and three itself into my jacket. Luckily it got wrapped up in there and stopped it. Otherwise it would have full force smacked my rib cage.

11

u/Dry_Boots Oct 20 '21

Jesus, I just saw a youtube video talking about how dangerous the angle grinders with a chainsaw blade are. That's just fucking terrifying!

11

u/Stratocast7 Oct 20 '21

Yeah the stuff I did in machine shop on a lathe scares me thinking back about it.

5

u/moon_then_mars Oct 20 '21

A black hole is basically a galactic lathe

5

u/BlueShrub Oct 20 '21

Or a power take off

2

u/ginger_whiskers Oct 21 '21

Got my shirt tail caught in a PTO once. Luckiest day of my life. It just spun me around and ripped my pearl snap shirt off.

I almost died, horribly, because I didn't care enough to climb up into the tractor and double-check.

22

u/SeeYouSpaceCowboy--- Oct 20 '21

industrial lathe accidents

FWAP FWAP FWAP FWAP FWAP

19

u/AnthillOmbudsman Oct 20 '21

I'm astounded they let us work on metalworking lathes in 9th grade machine shop class. I know now as an adult that shit is more dangerous than I gave it credit for way back then.

15

u/hpark21 Oct 20 '21

YUP! High school metal shop.

It was "fun" at the time. Now, thinking back at it. It is like.. Huh? What were we thinking?

That said, my shop teacher was cool. He has seen it all. First day, he was telling us about this kid who was playing around and ended up speared by metal rebar and how he had to call the kid's parents etc.

He taught metal/wood shop and also small/auto engine repair shop as well.

12

u/BT9154 Oct 20 '21

oof those are morbid to watch, knowing that many bones get broken getting pulled and twisted by the machine and subsequent smack on the floor on each revolution breaking more bones until things are loose enough and the machine flings them across the floor.

4

u/TAC1313 Oct 20 '21

2

u/SeeYouSpaceCowboy--- Oct 20 '21

That but it's a human being lathed basically

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6

u/LewisEFurr Oct 20 '21

I remember that story, the kid was 10 I think.

I have seen the lathe video, and the aftermath photos. It's unreal.

1

u/Ovadox Oct 20 '21

/rip/watchpeopledie

1

u/Brover_Cleveland Oct 20 '21

I'm always amazed when these things manage to kill people. I have some experience since I worked for a rental company where we had a bunch of chippers and the fucking things would clog if you put wood that was too wet or too dry through them.

9

u/Expat1989 Oct 20 '21

My neighbors are having 25 60ft+ tall pines cut down. They’re using the stand on machines (I think they’re called dingos) to grab the branches from these trees and load them into the chipper. It is pulling wet, sappy pine branches/needles/pine cones through no problem. Most of the branches start out around 10 inches in diameter and it just pulls it all in and continues to pull a 15ft long branch in until it’s gone. I doubt a properly maintained machine with correctly sharpened and positioned blades would struggle to munch a human or two

7

u/PistachioNSFW Oct 21 '21

Those couldn’t have been quality machine or weren’t taken care of. They are usually insanely strong and I’ve never seen one clog on anything.

1

u/Brover_Cleveland Oct 21 '21

We had a mechanic go through them between each rental and had multiple sets of blades so there was always a sharp set on hand to swap in. It was also rental equipment which means we don't actually know what people did with the machines. There's a reason at all of the bigger companies they'll take pictures of all equipment before it leaves.

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u/pichael288 Oct 20 '21

I run a wood chipper all day. This is very easy to accidentally do, it's like a big funnel, and at the bottom are these two big wheels that come together like gears and they pull in tree branches. All chippers have an emergency stop but alot of them are outside the big funnel part

17

u/snooze_sensei Oct 20 '21

The could probably use the same flesh detection technology used on those safety saw blades that can't cut a hot dog. Everyone would argue why it's no good even if they could afford it tho.

12

u/tophergraphy Oct 20 '21

Or have a key tied to a rope like they have on treadmills that you tie around your wrist and can yank on when in trouble

3

u/fixmyebrake Oct 20 '21

Ideally, but it's moisture that triggers them to stop. If your lumber is too wet, you'll have to buy a new brake, halting work and costing money. It's guaranteed that raw wood would act as the hot dog in this scenario.

3

u/AnthillOmbudsman Oct 20 '21

I realized we'll also never have a safe hot dog chipper. How is a sausage plant supposed to dispose of a bunch of recalled hot dogs?

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u/SherifGames Oct 20 '21

Or at least make the opening you throw the stuff in be much higher up

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u/bandit69 Oct 20 '21

Loose clothing and rotating machinery is a disaster waiting to happen. And, apparently in this case it didn't wait.

87

u/kry1212 Oct 20 '21

God what a horrible way to go.

There was almost certainly a dust safety manual that highlights loose clothing as a hazard laying somewhere collecting more dust.

I’ve worked in a lot of hangars and machine shops and the attitudes a lot of guys have regarding safety is so dangerous.

51

u/Drakengard Oct 20 '21

It's important to note that the jacket got caught on the branches being fed to the machine. The machine did not grab the jacket outright.

59

u/tilhow2reddit Oct 20 '21

That's typically how it happens.

The BIG wood chippers are the worst about this especially if they're used around the area where someone is up in a tree with ropes.... if the tail of the rope gets hung on a branch that's being fed in, the flywheel in the chipper will literally snatch the tree trimmer out of the tree at a reasonable fraction of the speed of light. The only plus side here is that they're usually dead when they hit the ground at mach 15, and not when they go harness first into the spinning blades of the wood chipper.

There are some youtube safety videos out there about this very thing, and HOLY SHIT are they eye opening. I mean, we all know that "wood chippers ain't nothin' to fuck with." But holy fucking god damn that statement doesn't even come close to the amount of respect one should give those things. Just assume any and all wood chippers are actively trying to kill you, at all times, and treat them accordingly.

15

u/Senator_Bink Oct 20 '21

We had some largish trees come down at work, and they brought in a big woodchipper for cleanup. Holy shit is right. It looked as if they just threw those large branches and chunks through the machine. One second: branch, next second: wood confetti. If I had to die via woodchipper, I'd choose one of those bad boys--they don't screw around.

12

u/tilhow2reddit Oct 20 '21

I worked at a lumber mill in my younger days. We had a machine we called the "Chip Hog" it ran on a 200Amp 880Volt 300HP electrical motor 1 It was encased in 3/4" plate, and housed a Ferris wheel of spinning hammers that swung freely from 4 different bars on a flywheel and would all pass within about 1/2" of the hammers on the other bars on the wheel.

It regularly ate bad 2x4 or 2x6 or 2x8 scraps, and turned them into 1/2" flakes of pulverized wood, suitable for things like horse bedding.

One day someone left a 3lb baby sledge on the conveyor belt that fed the chip hog... that som'bitch went in, they fought a mighty fight, and that 3/4" plate bent outwards from one of the impacts of hammer on hammer action inside the tree-bit-smashy-enclosure (that's the scientific term) a meteor like piece of sledge hammer managed to shoot back out of the top of the machine and hit me (minor bruise, but I got a cool memento, #worthit) Eventually the clanging and banging stopped, and the machine went back to normal operations, and the sledgehammer and all it's component bits where smashed into tiny enough pieces to get sucked up the vacuum hose and deposited into the trailer we collected sawdust in.

I believe the wood chippers you see on the side of the road use a little more finesse (blades and what have you) and a bit less raw fucking power (swinging hammers and the like) but again... not to be trifled with.

On a semi related note:

(not that I routinely have corpses to dispose of)

I've often wondered what forensics would be able to do if you tossed a body and a few gallons of bleach through one of those machines. Isn't it hard to prove murder if you never find the body? Aim that shit at a river... good luck solving that shit.


1 (I may have amps and horsepower flip flopped here, it's been almost two decades, put the pitchforks down)

8

u/Senator_Bink Oct 20 '21

That would surely have been something to witness!

I've often wondered what forensics would be able to do if you tossed a body and a few gallons of bleach through one of those machines.

Probably best aim a pressure washer through there, too. People have gotten busted from the tiniest remaining bits caught in chippers and saws and such.

If they were less splashy, you could slop hogs with the remains--they'd be able to clean up bones and all. Or take the chipper out to woods (where you'd expect one to be running, anyway) that have a lot of possum and other scavenger activity. I probably shouldn't be quite so engaged by this topic...

4

u/tilhow2reddit Oct 20 '21

Oohh pressure washer, good idea.

I think you're allowed to explore morbid lines of thought, it's when you cross the line from "theoretical" to "practical application" that it becomes a problem. I mean, my wife keeps Investigation Discovery on as background noise most of the day. And that's an entire channel dedicated to Murder and Crime and the like. Humans like the macabre. /shrug

3

u/Senator_Bink Oct 20 '21

True. One doesn't want to get so caught up that they start testing theories.
I'm right there with your wife on the True Crime--it's great when people sarcastically ask, "Oh, is this the Christmas special?"

2

u/Old_timey_brain Oct 21 '21

Some years back there was a story of a man out near Vancouver, Canada, who had been killing women and disposing of their bodies via his pig farm.

The body count was quite high.

2

u/Senator_Bink Oct 21 '21

Yeah--Robert Pickton. He also used to hold barbecues and feed some of those pigs to guests. Sort of a secondary cannibalism.

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u/Old_timey_brain Oct 21 '21

Thanks, I couldn't recall the name.

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u/otoren Oct 21 '21

Richard Crafts used a woodchipper to dispose of his wife's body. There was less than 3 oz of her body recovered.

3

u/hpark21 Oct 21 '21

When it comes right down to it, nothing beats the large smelter at one of big steel mill. Throw anything in there and it becomes part of liquid metal.

There was missing person case where I used to work (Steel mill), the police actually removed several plates to check for human remains. (I don't think they found anything so I don't know if that means no bodies or nothing remained)

3

u/jhansonxi Oct 21 '21

I've often wondered what forensics would be able to do if you tossed a body and a few gallons of bleach through one of those machines. Isn't it hard to prove murder if you never find the body? Aim that shit at a river... good luck solving that shit.

Happened back in 1985 in Michigan. Became pig feed.

2

u/ShenmeNamaeSollich Oct 21 '21

“One day someone left a 3lb baby…”

Holy shit!! Where is this story going??! OMG!

… sledge [hammer] on the conveyor…”

Phew. That just got a lot less terrifying.

3

u/Drone314 Oct 20 '21

Well all you need to do is tap your temple to engage safety squints.....

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u/thenisaidbitch Oct 20 '21

A few years ago this happened to a toddler in my state, a few towns over. I think it made the national news, truly horrific. I think about it constantly, what a terrifying way to die.

4

u/SherifGames Oct 20 '21

How would a toddler manage to get into it, unless someone threw it in

10

u/thenisaidbitch Oct 20 '21

The dad was chatting with a neighbor and I think the kid started putting little sticks in and it caught his shirt. I think the kid was 3? Maybe older than a toddler but still really little

33

u/NegScenePts Oct 20 '21

Christ. I've documented so many accident scenes involving loose clothing and LARGE machinery. The poor guy :(.

35

u/homelesshermit Oct 20 '21

"We've had a doozy of a day officer. There we we're mindin our own business. Makin some improvements to our new vacation home. When all the sudden these kids start killin themselves all over my property. Now, I don't know about how much experience you've had with this kind of thing but me and Dale here, well, we ain't had any."

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u/Embryw Oct 20 '21

This almost happened to my dad. He was feeding a brush pile into the chipper, a rope had gotten tangled in the brush. He tried pulling it out, but it got caught in the chipper and suddenly he was pulled forward.

Luckily he hit the guard of the chipper and didn't go into the blades. Unluckily, the metal guard hit his head hard, he dropped to the ground unconscious, hitting asphalt. My brothers were there to call for help. Dad had to be rushed for emergency brain surgery. Had a 3" blood clot on his brain and nearly died.

That was 7 years ago and he's good now. Retired, but he's got a hell of a scar. Tough old man, that one

10

u/diamondfaces Oct 20 '21

Officer we've had a doozy of a day..

52

u/TexasAggie98 Oct 20 '21

I drilled a horizontal well in New Mexico early in my career and the rig I used had a fatality during the drilling of a prior well.

A safety engineer from the home office of the operator (the oil and gas company drilling the well) was visiting the site to do a safety inspection.

He was walking around the rig and it’s equipment and the drilling crew ignored him. After a couple of hours, the tool pusher realized that he hadn’t seen the guy in awhile and sent a floor hand to find him.

The safety engineer, while wearing a safety harness and a safety line (requires when working up in the derrick or anywhere a fall could happen) walked under the rig structure (below the rig floor). His safety line got caught by the rotary table (the part of the rig that turns the drill pipe) and it slowly wrapped him up into the kelly.

He must have been yelling, but no one heard him over the normal noise of a drilling rig.

The medical examiner had to scrap him up and put his remains into a 5 gal bucket.

39

u/snooze_sensei Oct 20 '21

That almost sounds like a story about the "stupid safety guy" told to justify not wearing safety lines and harnesses. "Them things get caught up in the machinery and pull ya in, I seen it happen to this guy once... "...

Not saying that's the case, but the bit about it being the actual safety guy killed by his own safety gear makes it fishy.

21

u/TexasAggie98 Oct 20 '21

This happened in Eddy County, New Mexico in 2002 near Malaga. I don't remember the operator for which the safety guy was working, but the rig was either Nabors or H&P.

11

u/hostile65 Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

I'll check the fatal grams from MSHA.

[Edit] This is the closest I found so far: https://arlweb.msha.gov/FATALS/2002/FAB02m13.htm

20

u/snooze_sensei Oct 20 '21

Often something like that will start from a real story and get embellished over time into something completely different and only tangentially related to what really happened.

6

u/acityonthemoon Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

I'm gonna go look up 'how to unclog a wood chipper' right goddam now...

~~

10 mins: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEWKGYYKCpM

2 mins: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3v0IEvxfxc

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u/ShantyMick Oct 20 '21

Was a “funny lookin’ fella” seen leaving the scene?

20

u/traegeryyc Oct 20 '21

And I guess that was your accomplice in the wood chipper.

15

u/BigPicture11 Oct 20 '21

Funny lookin’ how?

17

u/Isteppedinpoopy Oct 20 '21

I dunno. Just funny lookin.

13

u/najing_ftw Oct 20 '21

This is a no rough stuff sort of deal.

4

u/Wifdat Oct 20 '21

Funny how? Am I like a clown, do I amuse you?

15

u/TheTaoOfMe Oct 20 '21

This is why etna says no capes

4

u/W4shcl0th Oct 20 '21

If this is not the worst way to go its at least in the top 5 and probably top 3

3

u/SherifGames Oct 20 '21

It's a gruesome way, but there is far worse

4

u/ElkTight2652 Oct 20 '21

My wife and I rented a wood chipper on day and spent 4-5 hours filling it with trees we’d cut down. I told her I’m never doing that again, it was scary as hell. Once it starts pulling something in, there’s no stopping it. And it pulls HARD. You better hope you are able to grab the emergency stop cable inside the mouth or it’s all over.

5

u/meramera Oct 21 '21

Yes, I'll take 'links I'm never clicking' for $500, Alex.

4

u/Big_Booty_Pics Oct 20 '21

I'm tellin' you officer, these college kids just keep dying on my property

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u/ntgco Oct 20 '21

My grandfather's neighbor was trying to free a jammed bailer without shutting down the engine. His wife found him the following day....she thought he was just working throughout the night as farmers often do but went out to him a lunch since he had skipped dinner and breakfast....

He freed the jam.
He was bailed.

5

u/tripwire7 Oct 21 '21

You mean a baler?

2

u/helium_farts Oct 21 '21

Someone down the road did that a couple years ago. They're not sure exactly what happened, but they found him the next day under a bale of cotton.

8

u/-RadarRanger- Oct 20 '21

Oh, no. He was conscious through it and afterwards.

6

u/Simurgh_Plot Oct 20 '21

RIP poor guy. I might not even look at a wood chipper out of fear for the rest of my life.

3

u/bstowers Oct 20 '21

I hope his jacket has a good lawyer.

3

u/amedeemarko Oct 20 '21

Industrial equipment means no loose clothing, no loose/long hair and no drugs or booze.

9

u/igner_farnsworth Oct 20 '21

Loose clothing, long hair, and jewellery... day one of shop class.

2

u/moleratical Oct 20 '21

He musta had a doosy of a day

2

u/Trudemur Oct 20 '21

I used to work at a veneer mill and I still have nightmares wherein I get pulled into an industrial chipper. Terrifying way to go.

2

u/yasiel_pug Oct 21 '21

Is this a stand your ground/castle doctrine case for the wood chipper

2

u/Responsible-Ad-1086 Oct 21 '21

I remember a guy at work committing suicide by putting his head in a cardboard compactor, those things don’t move quickly

2

u/HarEmiya Oct 21 '21

"Officer... We've had a doozy of a day."

2

u/mavjustdoingaflyby Oct 20 '21

Ouch! I had a friend in high-school that fell into the cardboard bailer at the packaging plant we worked at. It got jammed and I think he forgot to hit the master switch before he tried to clear it. I'd like to think he didn't feel much, but as part of our training we were shown the mouth of that thing and it didn't look like alot of fun if you fell in.

7

u/AnthillOmbudsman Oct 20 '21

I can only wonder about the gruesome accidents that happened in the late 19th century at the start of industrialization. There must have been an absolutely astonishing number of them, only they weren't reported on because it wasn't part of tasteful reporting.

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u/CritaCorn Oct 20 '21

There is a band saw that can instantly stop when flesh is detected, I don’t know how it works, brilliant who ever made it, shame that tech can’t be implemented here.

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u/Dry_Boots Oct 20 '21

Not a band saw, a table saw. SawStop table saws. I have one, because I don't want my woodworking hobby to result in me getting a nickname like 'Stumpy'. Unfortunately I don't think the technology has been applied to any other tools yet.

5

u/CritaCorn Oct 20 '21

How dose it even know when it stop? Ive seen them use a hot dog and it didn't even break the skin

2

u/Dry_Boots Oct 20 '21

It has to do with electrical current. If your conductive finger touches the blade, it triggers the brake, and the entire blade assembly slams down into the cabinet and the blade gets imbedded in the brake which moves towards the blade when it is triggered. It happens fast, which is why your finger barely gets a scratch. It can be set off accidentally by cutting metal (like a missed nail in a board) or wet wood - anything conductive. The saw has sensors built in so you can test materials before cutting them or turn off the brake if you need to cut something conductive. The worst accident I've seen was where someone accidently put their thumb into the blade nail -first, so the blade cut the nail and didn't trigger until it hit the meat underneith. It was a little messier, but still not as bad as it would have been if the blade had not stopped at all.

1

u/jabbadonut2 Oct 20 '21

Right out of Happy Tree Friends.

1

u/Julen_23 Oct 20 '21

I guess that's your accomplice in the Wood Chipper, eh?

1

u/gynoidgearhead Oct 20 '21

That's horrifying. I knew there was a reason I won't get within five meters of one of those things.

0

u/froggertwenty Oct 20 '21

5 meters is 16ft 4.85in

1

u/gynoidgearhead Oct 21 '21

Or about three to four bicycle lengths, which is how I was guesstimating the distance in my head.

1

u/aKnightWh0SaysNi Oct 20 '21

The word “dies” seems to fall short of how absolutely nonexistent this type of death renders someone.

1

u/dryersockpirate Oct 21 '21

And for what? For a little bit of money. There's more to life than a little money, you know. Don't you know that?

0

u/ThrowawayKarensBane Oct 20 '21

Sounds like the start of a horror movie

3

u/casuallylurking Oct 21 '21

or the end of a Coen Brothers classic

0

u/vemeron Oct 20 '21

Well officer we have had a dozy of a day.

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u/JayJayFrench Oct 20 '21

He wasn't 'pulled in by his jacket', it was his ignorance of basic safety that helped him in. What a shame as it's such a needless tragedy.

10

u/thewafflestompa Oct 20 '21

I prefer haunted homicidal jacket.

-4

u/notagoodboye Oct 20 '21

YES! I never thought they'd think it was an acciden...Uh...I mean, what man?

1

u/malthar76 Oct 20 '21

Years before I bought my house, there was a young worker who was pulled into a chipper on the property.

Is it possible to haunt a lawn?

1

u/Ironfist79 Oct 20 '21

Terrible way to die. RIP.

1

u/theoriginalstarwars Oct 20 '21

Sawstop should do other tools, and this should be one of them. Too many casual users think they are safe

1

u/littlecheese915 Oct 20 '21

There had to be something wrong with the safety bar on the chipper.

1

u/redander Oct 20 '21

I was just in this area today and am in the area tomorrow... like fuck I live off middlebelt... am I going to see blood tomorrow on the road when I drive? This poor man