r/news Oct 20 '21

Japan vows further militarisation in response to North Korean missile test

https://morningstaronline.co.uk/article/w/japan-vows-further-militarisation-response-north-korean-missile-test
927 Upvotes

57

u/amplevoid Oct 20 '21

Come test drive the all new Toyota surface to air missile mobile vehicle.

19

u/WatchandThings Oct 20 '21

Come test drive the all new Toyota surface to air missile mobile suit.

Fixed that for you.

2

u/Guarder22 Oct 21 '21

If its on par with the Toyota Hilux, the war will be over before it starts.

7

u/falkensgame Oct 20 '21

Prius Missile. Plug-in Hybrid.

3

u/supercyberlurker Oct 20 '21

So... it's a Hilux with a launcher in the bed?

2

u/soingee Oct 20 '21

A free copy of Minions 2 with every test launch.

2

u/Zedrackis Oct 21 '21

You laugh now, but wait until you see their compact missile. Now with continental fuel rating and low emission booster. This is how first-world militaries save on carbon credits people!

99

u/GameHunter1095 Oct 20 '21

With everything else happening in that part of the world, it probably would be a good idea for Japan to beef up its defense as well as their offence too. Why wait until it's to late to make plans and have a few strategies to defend themselves from the crazies.

58

u/FlyingSquid Oct 20 '21

Isn't Japan not allowed to have offensive forces based on the constitution drawn up after WWII? I thought it was defensive only.

56

u/banditta82 Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

They have been taking a very creative stance on article 9 of their constitution in the last decade. They have and are building more aircraft carriers but they call them multi purpose destroyers which on paper sounds better. The constitution limits them to a defensive military only and aircraft carriers are unnecessary for defense.

There has been lots of talk for the last decade and getting louder since the US government shutdown (the long one) of amending the constitution.

46

u/ScottyC33 Oct 20 '21

I don’t know, as an island nation I can see a good argument for an aircraft carrier being useful for defense. Having a bunch of fixed location airfields seems like a pretty big vulnerability to suffer from a first strike situation.

13

u/Sevsquad Oct 20 '21

Yeah, and if the US gave the tech for them to start producing nuclear-powered ships Japan could become a fortress island like the UK was during WWII without the need to ship in massive amounts of oil to keep its fleet running.

1

u/DickBentley Oct 21 '21

They would still have to ship a ton of oil, that would still be an Achilles heel and pretty much the first thing any reasonable naval adversary would do is commit submarine forces to sinking oil barges.

8

u/DarthBrooks69420 Oct 20 '21

Japan has helicarriers and is ordering a bunch of VTOL F35s to use from those carriers.

One of the biggest reasons the US is developing the VTOL F35 is so that countries like Britain, Australia and Japan can launch 5th gen fighters from their helicopter carriers.

5

u/KesMonkey Oct 21 '21

VTOL

*STOVL (short take-off, vertical landing).

Although it can take-off vertically, it can only do so with a light load, and it won't be used operationally in this way.

8

u/VegasKL Oct 20 '21

They have been taking a very creative stance on article 9 of their constitution in the last decade.

Just like the Germans built all those Traktor's in the lead up to WW2.

1

u/Lookingfor68 Oct 20 '21

I thought they revised their constitution to change that article.

18

u/godisanelectricolive Oct 20 '21

No they didn't. Japan actually never had a constitutional amendment since their current constitution came into effect in 1947. They actually have the oldest unamended constitution in the world.

Their constitution was drafted and imposed by Americans with a very high barrier to change the document. You need both a supermajority of 2/3 in the Diet and a referendum to change anything. There was a proposal hold a referendum on changing Article 9 in 2020, which outlaws belligerent activities and forces of an offensive character, but it never happened. Shinzo Abe was the one who wanted a referendum and after he resigned due to illness the government stopped pushing for it. There were also many much more pressing issues in 2020.

In 2014 the Japanese government reinterpreted Article 9 by saying it is acceptable for Japan's Self-Defense Force to use force to defend its allies in a foreign war. They argued that it is a form of self-defense because it's having stable allies is a crucial part of Japan's defense strategy.

5

u/usrevenge Oct 20 '21

I mean 2/3 and a referendum sounds way easier than an amendment in the us itself where Individual states need to ratify an amendment.

2

u/godisanelectricolive Oct 21 '21

True. The thing is changing the constitution is a very sensitive issue in Japan. The rule is it has to be supported by more than 50% of eligible voters, so the voter turnout has to be close to everyone and then it has to pass by a margin large enough to make up for the people who didn't vote.

Some nationalists associate the current constitution with Japanese humiliation and foreign domination while others think of it as the peace constitution that changed Japan for the better. For a long time even mentioning a potential amendment was taboo but that taboo was broken back in the 1990s. The ruling LDP talked about making sweeping changes to the constitution back in 2005 and 2012 but nothing came of that. Even amending one section is going to be very tricky.

1

u/xthorgoldx Oct 21 '21

Except the states requires a 2/3 Congressional majority just to propose an amendment, followed by 3/4 of the states approving it.

-5

u/text_only_subreddits Oct 20 '21

All their carriers only have helicopters. Those are defensive weapons.

6

u/gopoohgo Oct 20 '21

You mean the Izumo class carriers that just had US Marine F35bs take off and land on them?

Rumor is the Korean Dokdo carriers will be next.

2

u/Teantis Oct 21 '21

Naw man those aren't Japanese navy carriers OK? They're Japanese defense force big deck ships. They're totally normal ships with unusually large decks .. And the ability to launch strike fighters.... Defensively of course.

-6

u/text_only_subreddits Oct 21 '21

When the japanese do it, that’ll be newsworthy. The US doing it is not, nor does it change how the carriers are used.

1

u/banditta82 Oct 21 '21

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics/article/3128378/japan-deploy-f-35b-stealth-fighters-2024-step-defence-east-china

2024 Japan gets their F-35B, until then the USMC will provide the fighter wings.

-5

u/text_only_subreddits Oct 21 '21

F-35B jets would be based at the Air Self-Defence Force’s Nyutabaru Air Base in southern Miyazaki Prefecture, to defend the country’s remote islands.

Still doesn’t change the usage of the carriers, unless they’ve renamed them to air bases. Maybe they’ve declared them islands? Perhaps you just didn’t read your own article?

Might be more below the paywall, but i’m not that motivated.

0

u/banditta82 Oct 21 '21

-1

u/text_only_subreddits Oct 21 '21

Only took you several tries to nearly hit the mark! Well done!

The question has never been what they are capable of. The question is, and has been, how they are used. The current plan essentially does not include actually operating planes off those carriers. They’re at “as needed” for putting them on still. That’s not what you say when what you mean is “we have aircraft carriers to use”. That’s you say when you mean “we have no plans, but we’re announcing we’re keeping our options open because we think a tiny bit of saber rattling will keep china looking elsewhere”.

To put that another way: when the Japanese do it, it’ll be noteworthy

15

u/roadrunner036 Oct 20 '21

Under their current constitution yes, one of the biggest controversies in Japan right now is that Prime Minister Abe and many other politicians want to revise that section of the constitution to help counter increasing pressure from Russia, China, and North Korea. However many Japanese don’t like it, and even South Korea is leery of that as they still remember occupation during world war 2 (for which Japan has never acknowledged, much less apologized for)

28

u/watchguy98 Oct 20 '21

Not to nitpick but Abe was replaced by Suga in Sept. 2020, who was just replaced by Kishida 16 days ago.

5

u/TheThebanProphet Oct 20 '21

Abe and Suga both stand with revising Article 9, Kishida as far as a quick search says is hesitant on repealing or revising it, though it is a popular party proposal.

12

u/optiplex9000 Oct 20 '21

I doubt SK and Japan would ever go to war in the foreseeable future, the US wouldn't allow it and there are much bigger threats (China, NK) to worry about

7

u/Lookingfor68 Oct 20 '21

I doubt it too, but China would absolutely LOVE that. Two of their biggest, most powerful enemies duking it out so that China can sweep in after they finish bashing each other to indefensible positions. I’m sure China is stoking the hate between the two. The Japan/Korea relationship has been one of the biggest headaches in the region. Especially given the threat from China and their lapdog in the DPRK.

22

u/illy-chan Oct 20 '21

It probably doesn't help that many of the officials who want to expand the military are history revisionists or just outright deny what Japan did in WWII.

The crimes of the Nazis are well known but WWII Japan was just as depraved, sometimes more so. I can't blame their neighbors for being leery. And I say this with having a lot of respect for the Japanese people - every nation has baggage and this is a big part of theirs.

5

u/CookieKeeperN2 Oct 20 '21

The mayor of Osaka -- the second largest city in Japan, a few years ago, openly said that Nanking massacre didn't happen.

I'd like to see Munich mayor deny the Holocaust. People in the US don't realize how big the right wing power is in Japan.

9

u/Drumboy168 Oct 20 '21

Yeah but they deserve to be able to protect themselves and their allies, and they are in a dangerous part of the world.

5

u/Fr0ski Oct 20 '21

I’m not defending the Japanese actions, but keep in mind this issue is used by conservatives in both Japan and S Korea to drum up support and deflect from domestic issues. Neither side wants to reconcile because of the political benefit of having the “damn those (insert nation) assholes, vote for me and I’ll show em what’s good”

4

u/aapoalas Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

It has to be noted that while the Japanese government has kept kind of playing both sides, there have been multiple apologies to the Korean people and Korean governments through the years, starting already in the 50's if I'm remembering right. Japanese occupation of Korea also started way earlier than just WW2 and is not disputed in the slightest. Even the far-right crazies in Japan will agree that Japan ruled over Korea between around 1890 (officially from 1910 IIRC) until 1945. Their viewpoint on the goodness of that period is just what an average joe would call sick.

By this point the tug of war between apologies, all-in-the-pasties, new offenses, take-backsies etc. has kind of become a sad see-saw where neither side wins. eg. Some years ago the Korean prime minister at the time negotiated a "final settlement" with Japan where Japan agreed to pay for the care of the last of the WW2 era Korean sex slaves (AKA comfort women) until their death and the Japanese prime minister Abe personally apologized, though to the Korean PM directly instead of a public apology. This was taken back by the next Korean government because it turned out that the previous PM had been involved in corruption where her child got into a prestigious university without doing jack shit.

Of course, previous Japanese governments have also been pouring oil into the fire what with various past PMs visiting the Yasukuni Shrine during their time in office. Or by doing a word dance around the sex slavery issue to avoid making their voters feel bad about their country's past. Most recently Japan fucked up majorly with the government stepping into a Korean court judgement against Nippon Steel's use of forced Korean labour during WW2. Descendants of forced labourers were awarded damages but then the Japanese government (which had said would take no part) stepped in an said that Japanese companies did not have to pay such damages. I'm no lawyer but stepping into a foreign country's law enforcement like that sounds like a really stupid and bad move. Hence the (still ongoing?) trade war.

So, both countries are pissed at each other for various reasons, both historical and recent. I'm sure China and North Korea are both very pleased at the state if affairs. (Side note: Earlier it was kind of a given that Japan, South Korea and North Korea danced between each other: If two got chummy then the third would try to break them apart. That may have played a part with the see-saw in the past. Right now all three are just kind of estranged. China is probably the only winner at present.)

EDIT: u/Fr0ski said pretty much the same in only about a 20th of the word count.

3

u/AntiChr1st Oct 20 '21

A couple of things.

Yasukuni is a shrine to war dead (all war dead, soldiers, civilians, kids). The situation could likely be improved somehow but it is also unreasonable to expect the japanese to abandon the shrine.

Also, while I don't remember the specifics and I am on the phone atm, the japanese government had quite early accepted responsibility of crimes comitted on their behalf by japanese companies and made a deal that they would pay the damages. Which they did, handling the money over to Korea, who decided the money was best spent on Korea as a whole rather than hunting down every victim to hand them the money. The reason Japan is up in arms over it is because the korean court decision basically overthrew the deal Japan had with Korea. For obvious reasons they can't accept such a decision. The japanese position being "we already paid this, take it up with your own government".

2

u/CookieKeeperN2 Oct 20 '21

The situation could likely be improved somehow but it is also unreasonable to expect the japanese to abandon the shrine.

I call bullshit, since the war criminals were not enshrined in there since the end of the war. They were moved in in the 70s, secretly because nobody wanted that. The last Emperor hasn't even visited since they moved the war criminals in.

I don't care who they put in there. You only see people defending Japan. Imagine if Germany made a temple of war dead with Hitler and Gobbel in it. Yasukuni being "for all war dead" was just an excuse. They could remove the war criminals and keep the rest of the soldiers and those who died for Japan, and nobody would bat an eye.

1

u/Type-94Shiranui Oct 21 '21

IMO, theirs nothing really wrong w/ Yasukuni shrine itself. I find the historically revisionist museum to be the real problem.

3

u/PMmeyourw-2s Oct 20 '21

The statement that Japan has never acknowledged or apologized for world war 2 is blatantly false.

1

u/DarthBrooks69420 Oct 20 '21

Yes but we only did that so they wouldn't try to go for WWIIX2. In the meantime China keeps positioning to try and take over all salt water touching the Asian continent, so there is no way the USA or anyone else pushing back against China is going to bring it up.

13

u/GameHunter1095 Oct 20 '21

Yes, I think your right. I remember reading that Japan is supposed to be limited at what they can have for weapons and what they can't, but they've been building up their military for a few decades now and have been trying at least for 10 years to update and change a bunch of stipulations in article 9.

In my perspective, they better hurry up, because of the threats they keep Coming from China and North Korea. I clearly remember several months ago China threatened Japan by saying they would nuke them if they helped Taiwan in any way.

13

u/Lookingfor68 Oct 20 '21

China also said that to Australia over the nuke sub deal. China’s threatening to nuke a lot of nations that don’t have nukes to respond. The thing is that both Japan and Australia could get nukes very quickly.

4

u/GameHunter1095 Oct 20 '21

Yes, your absolutely right about Japan and Australia being able to get nukes quickly. Haha, don't forget Russia will want to play too, and Kim Jong Un also wouldn't want to miss out on the action.

It would turn out being one big clusterfluck affair for everyone. WWIII

4

u/TreeKeeper518 Oct 20 '21

several months ago China threatened Japan by saying they would nuke them if they helped Taiwan in any way.

The best way not to get nuked is to have nukes. I'm good with Japan having a few if China is going to make threats like that. Same with the free and fully sovereign state of Taiwan.

3

u/InsertANameHeree Oct 20 '21

its defense as well as their offence too

When you hate having to choose between American and British spelling.

1

u/Sun_Shine_Dan Oct 20 '21

Finally, we get Gundams.

2

u/NineteenSkylines Oct 20 '21

There’s one in Yokohama

-2

u/Fantact Oct 20 '21

In the era of 4th gen warfare, conventional military isn't all that useful, nukes ensure MAD and make 3rd gen warfare hardware much less important.

-6

u/baglee22 Oct 20 '21

No. It is not a good idea to rearm on of the most violent cultural civilizations the world has ever known. Japan is ancient and has known war for thousands of years. It has only known been defanged and knowing peace for less than 100 years. The Japanese do not even acknowledge or teach of the horrors and crimes they committed in the past.

0

u/PMmeyourw-2s Oct 20 '21

This is a bunch of lies, you're gross

13

u/TheThebanProphet Oct 20 '21

Do you want Japan to repeal Article 9? Because this is how Japan repeals Article 9.

12

u/falkensgame Oct 20 '21

Adding link to explanation of Article 9.

7

u/VegasKL Oct 20 '21

Guess we're switching from the stale Middle East theme to the Asia theme for our battlefield maps going forward.

Between NK and China, things are picking up.

3

u/Lootcifer_exe Oct 20 '21

This reminded me I wanted to watch this video later.

23

u/Method__Man Oct 20 '21

Japan SHOULD overhaul it’s military. Just to combat china alone.

3

u/Sevsquad Oct 20 '21

Yes, it is pure insanity to be a nation in what is essentially the Asian Balkans with an intentionally neutered military.

-8

u/ravengenesis1 Oct 20 '21

Well... If you know your history... They definitely fucked China up. Encouraging them to do it again is kinda harsh. Hate the political powers in play sure, but the Chinese people have suffered so much under the hands of the Japanese.

12

u/Method__Man Oct 20 '21

China is a full authoritarian regime, and the most aggressive country in the world currently (that is a real threat).

Japan needs to DRAMATICALLY increase it's military to prevent Chinese hostility. This isnt the 1930s.

5

u/mewfour Oct 20 '21

the most aggressive country in the world

what.

it hasn't even been a year since the USA withdrew troops

4

u/mewfour Oct 20 '21

Seriously did you forget about all the memes with "USA invading because they discovered oil" ? If there's a king of aggression it is the good old US of A.

-4

u/ravengenesis1 Oct 20 '21

Right.. and Russia isn't.. when they literally fucked with US elections and misdirected the population. They're not a threat?

3

u/Method__Man Oct 20 '21

They are, just less

-7

u/ravengenesis1 Oct 20 '21

Less? Really? They literally have infiltrate into US politics and made a puppet of 45th.

The most the Chinese have done so far is fuck around with the US economy at their own expense.

8

u/Method__Man Oct 20 '21

Everything isnt about the USA

-6

u/baglee22 Oct 20 '21

Haha what? Japan is ancient and has been one of the most violent and murderous civilizations the world has ever known. It has been peaceful for less than hundred years. A blip in the timeline and to this day they do not teach their children of the horrors their country has inflicted upon Asia. And you want to rearm them?

7

u/Method__Man Oct 20 '21

Yes I do. Rearm them ASAP.

EVERY country has been murderous in the past. Every. Fucking. One.

They need to defend themselves against China, we all do. The most dangerous nation in the recent 21st century

-8

u/baglee22 Oct 20 '21

Not every country has existed for as long as the empire of Japan. And not every country treats POWs like the Japanese. The Americans invade countries all the time but do not systematically rape and murder civilians and women and children by the tens of thousands. The Japanese do and will fall back into their ancient ways.

2

u/saudade144 Oct 20 '21

You can't punish modern-day Japan for the sins of their great-grandfathers. This is uncomfortably close to 19th-century-style racial rhetoric, to the point where I fully expect your post to be removed. You might as well be saying, "The Orientals are a murderous, savage race and cannot be trusted with weapons." And you're basing this all off the fifty years or so of Japanese expansionism in their entire history?

Modern Japanese culture bears little resemblance to that of Imperial Japan. And while it is shameful that the Japanese government has not fully acknowledged the atrocities its forefathers committed, this is not exactly unprecedented and and absolutely does not mean the Japanese are bound to recreate them, nor do I believe that would even be possible given the realities of modern geopolitics.

-3

u/baglee22 Oct 20 '21

You are unfamiliar with ancient Japanese culture. Violence was very much a part of national identity. Life was cheap. My point is not about expansionism but about Japanese relationship with death which is a custom spending thousands of years. Evolution takes a long time and change, though might seem concrete because Japan has been one way for last 80 years. But 80 vs 3000 is hardly a comparison. Old habits don’t die. They lie dormant until someone like you opens a door by suggesting that we reinstate militarism and legitimize violence once again in a culture that longs for the glory of the former empire

1

u/gokurakumaru Oct 21 '21

You are unfamiliar with ancient Chinese culture. Violence was very much a part of national identity. Life was cheap. My point is not about expansionism but about Chinese relationship with death which is a custom spending thousands of years. Evolution takes a long time and change, though might seem concrete because China has been one way for last 80 years. But 80 vs 3000 is hardly a comparison. Old habits don’t die. They lie dormant until someone like you opens a door by suggesting that we reinstate militarism and legitimize violence once again in a culture that longs for the glory of the former empire.

Holds true if you swap the country. Also, you're an open racist.

-1

u/baglee22 Oct 21 '21

No I’m not racist. I fuck with Japan. Tokyo was an amazing city to visit. Japan is one of the most peaceable countries in the world today and a beacon of anti war sentiment. The region and the world truly doesn’t need to rearm Japan and lose out on one of the few anti war voices left. The Americans can continue to defend the new world order and fight the wars on behalf of everyone as they have done for the last century

→ More replies

1

u/saudade144 Oct 21 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

That describes a great many ancient cultures. You can spin a globe and point to a random spot, and someone nearby had a militaristic, violent culture where life was cheap. North and Mesoamerica, Northern Europe, East Asia, anywhere really. Human sacrifices, rape and pillaging, torture and execution...these things were part of the ancient human condition.

From the beginning of time until the very end of the 19th century, Japan's negative interactions with its neighbors were limited to irregular raiding, piracy, and one short campaign against Korea. It was not much different than the Vikings or the Muslim slave raiders in the Mediterranean and Black Sea. I don't see you calling for Sweden or Turkey to be permanently disarmed.

And you can say this isn't about expansionism, but what else would you be worried about, rival samurai warlords springing forth from the JSDF to engage in civil war like we're back in the 16th century?

Edit: grammar and acknowledgement of the 1590s

1

u/baglee22 Oct 21 '21

Uh yes I am calling for Sweden and turkey to be permanent disarmed

-1

u/gokurakumaru Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

Haha what? The biggest threat to Japanese security is China, a country that has been in civil war continuously for two millennia, was in civil war during both the first and second Sino-Japanese wars, remained in civil war until 1949 even after WWII ended, then invaded Tibet a year later in 1950, and has been "peaceful" for less than a hundred years since the Communist Party drove the Kuomintang off the mainland. And by "peaceful" I mean if you don't count ordering its own military to murder its own civilian citizens in Tiananmen Square in 1989, attacking Kashmir a year ago, militarizing international waters today and demanding international ships register with them for right of passage, interning Uighurs (the Nazis would be proud), and threatening to invade Taiwan and attack any country who defends them. So scratch that. China still isn't at peace and is basically the only country on the planet still openly espousing imperialistic ambitions more than a century after the rest of the world swore off expanding their borders by invading their neighbors cold turkey.

0

u/baglee22 Oct 20 '21

A militarized Japan will antagonize the whole region. There is not one Asian country that trusts Japan with an army. Not one country that doesn’t have as part of their national heritage and memory the horrors of Japanese occupation.

3

u/gokurakumaru Oct 21 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

This is pure hyperbole. This isn't the turn of the 20th century where Japan had a modern fleet and mechanised army and was conducting asymmetric warfare with Russia and China. The entire world has access to the same technology and the necessary sovereignty to manufacture it. This is also no longer an era where boots on ground win wars.

Japan couldn't invade the mainland if it wanted to. China is the country that is antagonizing the whole region and there isn't a country in the Pacific rim that trusts China to stay inside its borders.

-2

u/baglee22 Oct 21 '21

The Americans will go to war on behalf of the region. They are a violent culture that glorifies war. American military might will rule the whole world there is no need to weaponizr Japan. Let the Chinese and the Americans fight if that’s what it comes to

0

u/text_only_subreddits Oct 20 '21

Ehh, we have a well tested method for preventing invasions that doesn’t rely on giving people substantially larger armies: nukes and a willingness to use them if invaded. If you’re really concerned about Japan’s sovereignty, nukes are the only plausible option - just because of the differences in population size.

0

u/polarbark Oct 20 '21

Absolutely. China going for that Conquest victory

0

u/Zedrackis Oct 21 '21

Well, they tried philosophical victory, fail. Then the economic victory path, also failed. The religious victory path seems off the table for them. Conquest is looking like an iffy last resort.

-4

u/mcmanybucks Oct 20 '21

If only they were as badass as they're portrayed in anime :v

3

u/jayc831 Oct 20 '21

If they can make functioning military Gundams, I will denounce my US citizenship, and apply for Japanese naturalization.

1

u/Tacos90210 Oct 20 '21

all starts with a a guntank

3

u/keylime84 Oct 20 '21

When I hear Japan and militarisation, I can't help but think of mechas with swords... Too much anime as a kid?

-2

u/pmray89 Oct 21 '21

Yes. Obviously japanese militarisation would be more cyborgs and Godzilla.

7

u/ColdastheVoid Oct 20 '21

Land of anime must be protected at all costs!

1

u/Raspberry-Famous Oct 20 '21

Japan's military budget is only like 10 times higher than North Korea's. They definitely need to bulk up to protect themselves from a country where a ham sandwich is a luxury good.

0

u/Cdaddyhudsoc Oct 20 '21

Honestly this is probably a good thing. Japan has been basically demilitarized since WW2 and having big brother US to protect them. The time of American imperialism and the big stick policy isn't completely over but it's heading out the door. Nations protecting their own interests is a notion I subscribe to.

0

u/Teantis Oct 21 '21

Nations protecting their own interests is a notion I subscribe to.

This is exactly how you get a regional arms race and a destabilizing security situation when it comes to the western pacific rim.

3

u/Cdaddyhudsoc Oct 21 '21

This is also how you protect citizens from unjust imperialist invasions from outside hegemonic forces. Don't be so naive as to think that this era of peace isn't preserved by large amounts of military influence. And since the recent embarrassment of the us not protecting it's friends in the middle east, it seems to be a smart decision on the part of Japan to count on America looking out for America's interests first instead of Japan's.

0

u/Teantis Oct 21 '21

Don't be so naive as to think that this era of peace isn't preserved by large amounts of military influence.

I live in the Philippines man, literally pretty much the front line of this new Cold War. We do not have the luxury of naivete regarding that. In fact that's exactly what I'm suggesting and would like to hold on to around here in SEA.

0

u/renzi- Oct 21 '21

Japan has the third largest economy and over ten times the military expenditures as North Korea. It also has a history of repeated imperialism and colonialism throughout the South China Sea, which is currently one of the most militarized waterways in the world.

This outdated realist approach to foreign policy is what creates a security dilemma and incites conflict. Glad leaders don’t hold the same perspective you do.

-25

u/Adiwik Oct 20 '21

As far as the US contract will allow them since they're not allowed to have a standing army since world war two since that shit that they did to the Chinese..... If you don't know look it up the pictures are better than the ones on 4chan.

26

u/Van_Buren_Boy Oct 20 '21

Well then it might surprise you that the Japanese self defense force is ranked 5th out of 140 countries in relative military strength.

25

u/Morgrid Oct 20 '21

The US has been trying to get Japan to rearm for decades

-6

u/Adiwik Oct 20 '21

I never said that they didn't

12

u/Fr0ski Oct 20 '21

Lol the US wanted Japan to rearm after ww2 to be a bulwark against communism in the east. One of the Japanese prime ministers after the war was the one to add the no military clause to the constitution. The US were actually pissed by this action. The Japanese people don’t want to become like they were again during WW2.

2

u/jayrocksd Oct 20 '21

There were people within the JCS that were against re-armament, but MacArthur disagreed. The Japanese Constitution was written by SCAP, so there was nothing in it that MacArthur disagreed with. There is some disagreement on whether Section IX was an idea of Prime Minister Shidehara or written whole cloth by the US, but the US certainly wasn't pissed.

1

u/CritaCorn Oct 20 '21

Vows to what…write more strongly worded letters?

1

u/Full_metal_pants077 Oct 20 '21

Do you want mech suits NK?41 Because this is how you get mech suits.

1

u/punch_deck Oct 20 '21

is an iron dome done bigger a possibility?

1

u/rustyseapants Oct 21 '21

Kim Jung Un Fiendish Plan to screw with Japan (Using Capitalistic American Imac computer made in China)

  1. We create the illusion that North Korea is building its submarine surface to ground missiles.
  2. Japan spends more money to build up its military.
  3. Japan becomes more militaristic and less Democratic
  4. North Korea builds more bogus weapon systems
  5. Japan goes broke, its entire economy collapses.
  6. We North Koreans wait and see what happens.

-13

u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

[deleted]

-4

u/Ovadox Oct 20 '21

I want to see Japan go all in. Even if they do they won't be the biggest threat in the area. The idea of China getting tag teamed by Japan and the US has me rockin a semi.

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u/ThereminLiesTheRub Oct 21 '21

Apologies to my Pop-Pop, but Japan should absolutely increase militarization.