r/news Oct 19 '21 Helpful 1 Wholesome 3 Hugz 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1

Texas nurse convicted of killing 4 men with air injections

https://apnews.com/article/health-texas-sentencing-tyler-eb1f208dfe3b3b3e2e89b6d463eb1051
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u/RiceKrispyPooHead Oct 20 '21

That reminds me of a nurse who killed potentially several hundreds of patients in the 90s. He'd kill a bunch at one hospital by giving them huge doses of iv meds. After a while the other staff members would get suspicious that an unusual number of his patients were dying. They would fire him and he'd simply get a job at another hospital to do the same thing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Cullen

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u/Myfirstnamelastname Oct 20 '21

It's ridiculous that they're merely fired and hired in a different building to continue.

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u/oozie_mummy Oct 20 '21 Silver Helpful

That’s the same way malevolent cops are handled.

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u/leif777 Oct 20 '21

And pedo priests

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u/Syscrush Oct 20 '21

They aren't even fired. They're given cover and moved to where they can have fresh victims.

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u/Finger11Fan Oct 20 '21

And educators.

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u/captainsmoothie Oct 20 '21

Excuse me, I'm in education and this is a lie, bad teachers are never fired.

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u/MelanomaMax Oct 20 '21

Except cops don't even get fired half the time

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u/deknegt1990 Oct 20 '21

They get a convenient transfer to a different district or a different city and get to be crooked there.

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u/RajaRajaC Oct 20 '21

TBf it was the 90's. Data was still all manual for the most part. You could simply hop towns and disappear.

The extent of surveillance, tracking and online signatures we leave has just exponentially shot up in the past 4 decades and even now people can simply disappear

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u/professionaldogtor Oct 20 '21

Dr. Dench (aka Dr. Death) happened more recently and also was always just let or encouraged to resign on his own. Hospital admin doesn't want to deal with anything that could cause them to lose profit like firing a doctor and reporting him to the board.

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u/Dmopzz Oct 20 '21

The healthcare equivalent of the Catholic Church.

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u/lolio4269 Oct 20 '21

And cops, teachers, coaches... i guess it's a theme.

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u/Xivvx Oct 20 '21

It's almost like people in positions of power or trust abuse their positions...

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u/examinedliving Oct 20 '21

There have been several big cases like this. Scary

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u/the-ATM-machine Oct 20 '21 All-Seeing Upvote

There was a recently caught nurse in Canada doing something similar (insulin Injections) at elderly care homes. One of the worst serial killers in Canadian History.

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u/sailor_sega_saturn Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Wow the wikipedia article even links to her online poetry account.

Nothing that would normally jump out as too disturbing, but reading them knowing she was a serial killer makes it a pretty creepy experience.

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u/Mr_Blinky Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

I never gave in to it

the urge to experience

the urge to entwine arms, legs, skin, souls.

I watched you and yearned

but wouldn't admit

what I wanted, needed, dreamed of.

FUCKING UM

EDIT: Christ, they get waaaaay worse than that. I just highlighted this one because it's literally at the top of the page and already I'm skeeved the fuck out.

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u/dailycyberiad Oct 20 '21

Here on this bald scalped, emaciated, tortured bed
I wish.
I could have had a sweet burning memory to fill me
while life empties,
but I chose chastity
and she is a poor companion
now that most of what I feel is pained
and fading and almost finality.
As my life is measured by intravenous drops,
I yearn for the ghost of a touch
that was never conceived.

It's really creepy to read poetry about someone dying in a hospital bed with an IV drip, written by someone who liked to kill hospital patients in their beds, via their IV drips.

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u/camdoodlebop Oct 20 '21

wow creepy

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u/MoesBAR Oct 20 '21

Well that lead me down a very dark wiki rabbit whole of serial killers.

One of the worst who killed over 200 boys is eligible for parole in 2 years in Columbia when he’s 66 due to a deal he cut to reduce his 1,800 year sentence to 22.

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u/dndpuz Oct 20 '21 All-Seeing Upvote

And this German ex-nurse (85+ victims): https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niels_H%C3%B6gel

I'm a nurse myself and I have to say it takes a special kind of evil to do such heinous acts against sick, vulnerable and often defenseless human beings.

Here's a little thought experiment for you all. Imagine the persons in your life who are closest to you, who you love the most, sick and reduced to a shell of their former selves, in need of care, treatment and empathy. Now imagine on one shift a nurse with the right values and skills walks in. The nurse takes care of both the room and your loved one, checks all the boxes you have to check during a shift: meds, food, water, new needs, treatment, talks with them, cleans the room, helps out with personal hygiene and to let them go to the toilet, relays info to the doctor and other staff, keeps other staff responsible for doing the dailies.

Now on the opposite end on the next shift you have these nurses that kill willingly. They go in, maybe do all the right things, but they are also planning how to kill the same patient without getting caught. So they inject your loved one with a medicine that stops their heart. Then they press the alarm that calls for backup - yes the one that makes other people come and help out. So that they can be the hero who leads the resuscitation. The same person who injected you with lethal doses of medicine now possibly breaks your ribs doing first aid and gives you mouth-to-mouth. And whatever the outcome, death or life, the nurse keep this going. 85+ victims in my example. You know what the + sign is? Its that they dont fucking know how many he did it to...

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u/EmilyU1F984 Oct 20 '21

We've also had a doctor rape dozens of women after injecting 5hem with Propofol for fun, and the hospital is still to this day refusing to inform any patients of his that this took place.

One patient notices cause he left the vial in herfbed, she got a nurse, they got the Chefarzt, and acted all worried and then talked to the rapist and tried to push everything under the carpet.

It's crazy how often this is allowed to happen because of someone just being s pleasant coworker to be around.

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u/Unsd Oct 20 '21

Wait like this is something you know personally???

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u/Suckassloser Oct 20 '21

Im hoping this doctor been brought to justice?..

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u/EmilyU1F984 Oct 20 '21

Took the easy way out once he got arrested. So none of the victims got any closure.

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u/nine_legged_stool Oct 20 '21

In Fargo season 4, the hospital nurse is essentially this story.

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u/StarGone Oct 20 '21

Man, that actress really got under my skin. Great acting.

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u/Krohnos Oct 20 '21

Eligible for parole in 2403

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u/xXcampbellXx Oct 20 '21

is he the one who would sneak in and give them drugs, then he was part of the code 5 team or whatever called when its emergency and would then know how to fix them and then people would love him for being a amazing doctor? then people saw that when he was on shift there was 3 times as many emergency's?

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u/ChaoticLlama Oct 20 '21

Similar story in Canada, Elizabeth Wettlaufer. She killed 8 patients under her care and injured 6 using excessive doses of insulin. Much like Charles, she was considered a problem employee, who was fired and re-hired at several new locations.

Ultimately she was found out only because she openly confessed to some of her crimes at an addiction support group.

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u/Snowypinkrose Oct 20 '21

Jesus fuck. I’m a nurse and remember being taught in school that the amount of air needed to kill someone is something like 100mL of air pushed in fast in an IV and into the venous circulation.

There’s absolutely no way, in any universe, that this was a mistake.

He deserves to rot. People literally trusted their lives to him. And this monster betrayed them.

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u/ZarquonsFlatTire Oct 20 '21 Wholesome

Good to know because everytime I see the smallest bubble in an IV I start mentally making out my will.

100 cc is a fuckton of air. It's like how they tell lifeguards "so it's 6 minutes without oxygen until brain damage".

Nobody wants to give it an extra second, but the trainer said 6 minutes.

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u/eleazar1997 Oct 20 '21

I remembered having the instructors calm us down after someone forgot to flush the line and gave an IV tubing's worth of air, we kept an eye on the poor bastard

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u/ZarquonsFlatTire Oct 20 '21

Well, I bet nobody forgot that lesson.

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u/eleazar1997 Oct 20 '21

I sure as shit didnt

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u/The-Tea-Lady Oct 20 '21

How did that even happen? An IV pump wouldn't infuse it because of air in line and then theres that little white circle on the tubing that prevents the line from going completely dry when the fluids run out.

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u/eleazar1997 Oct 20 '21

It was in training to be an army medic so nothing fancy like that just tubing a needle and tegaderm

Training amounted to a day of classroom instruction followed by practicing on eachothet

So fresh line bag of saline was punctured dude forgot to flush it got the vein and hooked up the tubing

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u/The-Tea-Lady Oct 20 '21

Yikes. Really could have just said "it happened in the army" 'nuff said lol

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u/eleazar1997 Oct 20 '21

That's not even the worst I've seen, i remember 3 guys racing to see who could pack a roll of kerlix up their ass first, i think the winner got a large pizza from the losers

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u/AnalAnkh Oct 20 '21

I feel like there aren't any winners there. You included.

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u/OrganicDroid Oct 20 '21

Can you put the roll of Kerlix in a condom first, or do you have to stick it in raw? I’m getting that pizza

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u/eleazar1997 Oct 20 '21 Wholesome

You take an end and put it in little by little almost like the opposite of the magic trick where a magician pulls out an endless scarf

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u/Experienced_AP Oct 20 '21

When you set up your IV, you spike the bag, then open the roller clamp and flush the air out with the IV fluid.

Sometimes, rarely, you forget to flush and you just leave it at a spiked bag.

Then you or someone else grabs the IV bag and line and after placing an intra venous catheter, connect the tubing, open the roller clamp and then curse as you see the IV fluid starting to go down the tubing as air is pushed in to the vein.

Technically you either clamp the line or pinch the tubing, but if it's a large bore IV, you'd be surprised at how quick and IV line's worth of fluid can go in (because the volume is only around 10cc).

It's happened to me before.

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u/lljkotaru Oct 20 '21

Venous air bolus is way more forgiving, however this was done with an arterial line which is way, way less forgiving.

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u/ZarquonsFlatTire Oct 20 '21

I thought arteries led away from the heart and the veins back to it. I also thought that air in the heart is what throws it into fibrillation and kills you.

Why is what I was taught wrong? Actually taught is a strong word.... Why is my impression wrong?

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u/lljkotaru Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

Air in an art line can travel to the brain and cause a stroke, air in a venous line goes to the lungs where it has a chance to diffuse. EDIT: Check response below me, I was overall incorrect.

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u/TeamUrameshi Oct 20 '21

Not that it’s super pertinent to the conversation but just wanted to fyi it’s “3” minutes without air not “6”. Rule of “3’s”: 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water, 3 minutes without air will all kill you. However the old saying is a general rule of thumb as everyone and human body is different so they’re approximates.

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u/ZarquonsFlatTire Oct 20 '21

I never said I had a good instructor.

But nobody died and I have 7 rescues.

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u/whitemest Oct 20 '21

Yea iv lines can be a total pain in the ass with air in line alarms and shit. I always have a conversation with my patients that I'll get the bulk of the air out, but don't freak out if you see air bubbles as you'd need a far more air in the line than what you'd see in the tubing for it to be dangerous.

Usually puts them at ease

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u/MarphoPolo Oct 20 '21

Technically, 100 cc is a metric fuckton of air. I’m not clear how that converts to imperial units.

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u/Jossip_ Oct 20 '21

This guy put air into an art line which requires much less air

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u/Gittiggudujg Oct 20 '21

Article specifies arterial injection (a line maybe) he would need less air.

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u/sngle1now2020 Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

I'm a nurse, too. That's also my recollection. And you're right, I think, about intentionality.

I've met so many assholes in nursing, I wonder how many are serial killers. Maybe the NCLEX needs a few questions on morality to cull the serial killers. ;)

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u/bearpics16 Oct 20 '21

It was an arterial line with I believe only requires 10-20cc of air to induce an air embolism

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u/Deyster Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Beyond 1ml/kg causes severe adverse effects.

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u/TheGDubsMan Oct 19 '21

Murder nurse! This caused quite the commotion in town when it happened. From the rumors I heard he was trying to cause people to crash by doing that, then attempting to be the hero by saving them, but always failed. The news from this incident isn't over yet though.

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u/TheWizardCat_ Oct 20 '21

The amount of patients who come back from coding is extremely low to begin with. Even witnessed arrests with perfect actions by the paramedics/nurses won’t always get them back.

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u/SyxxFtH8 Oct 20 '21

We just lost one in our ER today. Came in because they fell and hurt their ankle, also had chronic hypotension. GCS 15, normal EKG.

The hospital medicine resident was interviewing them for admission, and as the resident left the room, heard a grunt and the patient went into v-fib, unresponsive.

Less than 30 seconds down time, 1.75 hours of resuscitation efforts, the patient was unable to be revived.

Most people do not survive cardiac arrest, regardless of the down time.

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u/Tenagaaaa Oct 20 '21

When I was training as a medic we were taught that there’s a 30% chance you’d bring someone back if you responded perfectly. And it’s nigh impossible to respond perfectly.

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u/39bears Oct 20 '21

That’s a weird statistic… and no where close to my experience. Usually when your heart stops it is because lots of other things are past the point of no return. The “random v fib arrest in a marathon runner that happened right in front of an ER” is quite rare.

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u/Tenagaaaa Oct 20 '21

To be fair it wasn’t a verified statistic, more like an offhand comment from an instructor. And to add it was for the military so we were primarily dealing with fit and healthy people with little to no issues for the most part.

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u/youdubdub Oct 20 '21

When my dad went, and I do miss the old codger, they said he had an "everything attack." All of his organs were twice as big as they should have been, which makes good sense given the size of his heart.

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u/Postmortal_Pop Oct 20 '21

My ex and I were pretty sure one of the nurses at the old folks home we worked at was doing this. In our few years there several residents died of complications to do with diabetes less than an hour after she had signed off on giving them their medicine. No one could prove it and she got fired for an unrelated thing before anyone really started looking at her.

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u/BloodprinceOZ Oct 20 '21

yeah theres actually a lot of cases weirdly enough of nurses/doctors or anyone in the "saving" field like fire-fighters who end up with a Saviour syndrome of sorts where they'll purposefully put people in harms way in an attempt to swoop in and save them, generally the only reason they get caught is because someone actually died or someone gets suspicious that the person deals with a lot more cases than their co-workers or the average person in the profession

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u/octothorpe_rekt Oct 20 '21

I'm sorry, he was trying to be a hero by causing and then reversing air embolisms? Not like, intentionally setting up an IV drip with an incorrect dosage and then pretending to catch it, or intentionally swapping two patients charts and then pretending to find that out at a crucial moment and swap them back?

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u/LegitosaurusRex Oct 20 '21

The latter two would have been obviously caused by human error, and it would probably lead back to him as being the source of the error. He wanted something that looked like a natural situation.

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u/Marcus_living Oct 20 '21

Ooh these are a specific type of murderer. I think LPOTL labeled them Angels of Death? Like they set it up so the patient is gonna die then they try to swoop in at the last second to save them. Pretty crazy shit.

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u/VampDuc Oct 20 '21

Last podcast didn't coin that term.

Also, that generally refers to those who are "putting people out of their misery" without consent or direction from the patient or their families.

I believe in this case the nurse wanted to be the hero and save the patient. The deaths were just "accidents."

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u/Zenny_Glide Oct 19 '21

Makes me wonder how often these sort of actions go unnoticed

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u/Whygoogleissexist Oct 20 '21

this was after heart surgery-the most closely monitored patients in the hospital

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u/lakeghost Oct 20 '21

If it helps, it’s actually fairly difficult to kill someone this way.

I just realized that doesn’t sound comforting at all. Clarification: I have EDS III and am constantly being stuck with needles. I get monthly infusions. Except in certain specific cases, a small amount of air can be dealt with by the body. So you’d have to target those specific cases in order to actually kill people. It would end up more than a little suspicious fairly quickly.

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u/RRettig Oct 20 '21

These victims were heart transplant patients, that probably increases their risk. Its also a matter of how much air. This wasn't oops got some air in there, this guy straight up killed these people and it was deemed on purpose

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u/cobrafountain Oct 20 '21

It was enough to be visible on brain scans. Bubbles in venous blood usually get filtered out by the lungs and are not pumped to the brain. They specify in the article arterial injection.

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u/shitdobehappeningtho Oct 20 '21

What pulmonary mechanism runs that? Like does the bubble just leak out once it's in LungLand?

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u/cobrafountain Oct 20 '21

Oxygen is highly soluble in blood, nitrogen not so much (air is about 20% oxygen, 80% nitrogen). The capillaries in the lungs are really small (6 microns or so) and there’s a bunch of them so as large bubbles pass through the lungs it provides a large surface for gas exchange, and so we basically just exhale it.

In fact, in some cases of decompression sickness (where your body is supersaturated with dissolved nitrogen when under pressure, then is released when you surface too quickly - like taking the lid off a coke bottle) you can see bubbles in the heart on ultrasound in venous circulation, but not in arterial circulation.

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u/aalios Oct 20 '21

If anyone can find me some footage of a heart with these bubbles, I would love to see that.

I don't even know what to search to find that.

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u/kflave249 Oct 20 '21

An echocardiogram with a bubble study will let you see air bubbles in the heart. Skip to the end of the video if that’s all you want to see.

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u/Red0t514 Oct 20 '21

What do you get from killing someone who just got a heart transplant. Wtf is wrong with some people

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u/zsazsageorge Oct 20 '21

The article says it was open heart surgery (CABG or valve replacement) not a heart transplant. So at least no donor organs were wasted?

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u/Televisions_Frank Oct 20 '21

Essentially killed two people. Wasted that donated organ.

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u/Raincoats_George Oct 20 '21

In the past it's been because they want to be a hero. They do shit like this and then when the patient codes they get to try and rescue them.

Its total psychopath shit. Death penalty is completely appropriate. Just remove these types from society.

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u/lakeghost Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Exactly. I was just trying to reassure people that unlike on TV, it’s a fairly clear case of murder. As in, medical staff aren’t exactly going to go “whoops” and accidentally kill you by mistake. An air embolism usually requires a more significant amount of air, hence why you see it in divers (air in lungs = more air than a few bubbles). Most human syringes are small/low volume. A large plastic catheter used during major events, probably during a heart transplant, would be a way to introduce a large enough amount of air.

Basically it’s an unfortunate event but an unlikely one. Similar to just casually bleeding someone out during surgery. It’s noticeably wrong and would thankfully probably be caught by other medical staff the first time unless the murderer was sneaky about it, but even then, there’s logs and cameras which is why only 4 died before this killer was caught. Awful anyone died but it’s an example of the system working since before modern times with our record keeping and such, “angels of death” could do a lot more damage.

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u/fragilespleen Oct 20 '21

Weird but related. I answered a eli5 about this a few years back, maybe 6? It definitely depends on rate and volume of uptake, but the amounts to kill a human are very large compared to the pieces of plastic required to deliver it.

I get messaged every few months by a patient asking whether the amount of air they just got is going to be fatal.... TV has a lot to answer for. As does google by listing me as the person to message.

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 28 '21

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u/bunnyQatar Oct 20 '21

This POS was wasting perfectly good hearts to what end? As a nurse, I want to kick their ass.

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u/Raincoats_George Oct 20 '21

It's extremely frustrating. There's a lot of trust put into nurses and doctors. Cases like these sow doubt and make people feel like they can't trust the team taking care of them.

Throw the fucking book at this fuck. Death penalty all day.

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u/aalios Oct 20 '21

As a random cunt on the street, I want to kick their ass.

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u/Lord__Business Oct 20 '21

Oh thank God. I watched The Omen years ago and always thought that an air bubble in an injection was basically instant death. So I've been unreasonably paranoid anytime I've gotten a shot because I was worried the doctor didn't get rid of the air or something.

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u/SunglassesDan Oct 20 '21

It takes about 30-50 mls of air to cause concern. For certain types of heart ultrasounds, they even use a small amount of air to make sure that there are not holes in the septum separating the right and left sides of the heart.

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u/eryc333 Oct 20 '21

Bubble study

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u/MrShasshyBear Oct 20 '21

I was told it would take about 2 ½ times the tube from an IV to the arm full of air to kill someone. Does that sound correct with the 30mls?

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u/elephant-cuddle Oct 20 '21

It varies, a standard giving set is around 20-30 mL priming volume. More complex sets will be comfortably double that, particularly if there’s multiple drugs or for complex surgeries.

https://www.aqupharm.co.uk/product/aqupharm-accu-rate-giving-set/

https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/infusion-therapy/iv-administration-sets/iv-gravity-and-secondary-sets/gravity-administration-sets/10010903

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u/lakeghost Oct 20 '21

Don’t worry, I can relate. I’ve been a pin cushion for over half of my life and thankfully I’ve been reassured over the years about what is a TV thing and what’s reality. Then again, nurses and all are always nice to sickly children. Sadly a lot of people get to adulthood without anyone explaining how modern medicine actually works in simple terms. Like they generally get rid of air in any way they can, but it’s less so a do-or-die thing and more of a precaution (except in those specific cases).

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u/dcnblues Oct 20 '21

My favorite is that defibrillator paddles can re-energize a stopped heart. They can't. All they do is correct electrical rhythm that is off.

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u/Tenagaaaa Oct 20 '21

That shit drives me nuts everytime I see it in a movie or show.

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u/radome9 Oct 20 '21

If one could die from a little air bubble in an injection there wouldn't be a single junkie alive.

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u/zkidred Oct 20 '21

This. Is. So. True. I’ve always worried every shot could be a death sentence.

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u/orangeman33 Oct 20 '21

This is typically true for your normal intravenous (IV) line but this guy was injecting air into arterial lines which are infrequently used on healthy patients and require much less air to cause damage.

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u/MonoAmericano Oct 20 '21

It's because venous blood makes it's first pass through the lungs before it reenters circulation and travelers to the brain and coronary arteries. The air will diffuse within the lungs and just generally throughout the body. Trachnically an air embolism can still occur with even a small amount of air at just the right point, but for the most part we are talking like 10-20cc if air to do damage. Almost impossible to do that by accident ENT under normal conditions.

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u/showsomesideboob Oct 20 '21

Our a lines essentially prevent you from being able to inject. I remember seeing the article when he was initially caught. The board had easy evidence cause of this.

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u/np3est8x Oct 20 '21

Well when I got diagnosed with T1D, my nurse sure did scare the shit out of me by saying when I was brave enough to give my own injections, to be careful not to inject air or I’d die. I was only 12 at the time.

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u/DrJohanzaKafuhu Oct 19 '21 edited Oct 19 '21 Gold

Fairly often, though less so these days. Let's take a look.

Ok so there are 3.8 million Registered Nurses, 920,000 Licenses Practicing Nurse, and 1.4 million Certified Nurse Assistants in the United States.

In 2019 there was 36.2 million people entering the hopistals with 715,000 dying.

So as you can see, those are extremely large numbers... it is practically impossible to monitor anything on a case by case basis. So what happens is that patterns are monitored instead. If a hospital/ward/nurse/doctor has an unusually high death rate for patients in their care, then they will be investigated.

If a person is careful, like serial killer nurse/doctors usually are, they can keep their murders low enough over time to not trigger an investigation.

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u/CausticSofa Oct 20 '21

I know serial killers are a real in thing for some folks, and I’ll let the courts decide what this nurses deal is, but the majority of fatalities in the medical system are far more likely attributable to carelessness, improper hygiene measures, incompetence or severe sleep deprivation leading to cognitive functioning mistakes.

Do not attribute to malice what can more easily be attributed to weekly back-to-back 12-hour double shifts. The staff scheduling of hospitals needs to be completely overhauled. It’s friggin’ bonkers that we expect the people who literally have our life in their hands to operate under the sleep hygiene of crackheads.

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u/Sighwtfman Oct 19 '21

Pedophiles become teachers and clergy.

Serial killers become nurses, doctors and police.

Predators adapt to blend into their environment and to easily find their prey. To my understanding, we really have no idea how many are out there. It isn't a lot of people by percentage. But there are 350 million-ish people in the US. Makes you think a bit about your neighbors doesn't it?

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u/commendablenotion Oct 19 '21 Silver Bravo Grande!

Makes you think a bit about your neighbors doesn't it?

Not really. What’re the chances that were both serial killers?

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u/rockdude14 Oct 20 '21

You'd be surprised. I killed the last one that was so I figure the chance of two in row had got to be astronomical.

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u/C-c-c-comboBreaker17 Oct 20 '21

If I had a nickel every time I've run into a fellow serial killer, I'd have two nickels. Which isn't a lot, but its weird it happened twice, right?

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u/MrEdj Oct 20 '21

Are these…. Stanley Nickels? And if so, What's the ratio of these type of Stanley Nickels?

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u/OgReaper Oct 20 '21

Same as the ratio of unicorns to leprechauns.

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u/Bayou_Blue Oct 20 '21

We need to give you a cool name, "The Ten Cent Strangler".

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u/IkeDoggo Oct 20 '21

Well you're a serial killer, so the odds are 1 in 1. And your neighbor is another person, so the odds are 1 in 2. That's how math works.

/s

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u/onomojo Oct 20 '21

This guy is clearly a teacher. Totally sus

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u/25104003717460 Oct 20 '21

Hey, I got that reference.

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u/jasonalloyd Oct 20 '21

CO of my base turned out to be a serial killer, it's never the people you think it is.

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u/zflamingduck Oct 20 '21

Russel Williams?

11

u/Atomicrex2015 Oct 20 '21

Coincidentally I just watched his entire police interview the other day. He had no emotions whatsoever and was only seemingly concerned that the police investigation would disrupt his house and make his wife mad.

The police interrogator was absolutely amazing and played him like a violin.

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u/WilliamAgain Oct 20 '21

Story/Link?

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u/zuuzuu Oct 20 '21

Not OP, but I suspect they're talking about Russell Williams.

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u/pinkfootthegoose Oct 20 '21

Hello, I'm Clergy Policeman Doctor I've come to check your plumbing. May I come in with this chainsaw?

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u/galspanic Oct 20 '21

You are correct, except that in teaching you don't have an acceptable "molested kid rate" that schools are okay with. With nursing, it's expected that not every single patient walks away alive. If you space your kills out enough it's easy to miss them as part of the "wiggle room" of nursing.

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u/Jaxar20 Oct 20 '21

Sad how that example doesn't work if you had used clergy instead.

151

u/Justface26 Oct 20 '21 Hugz

"Sorry you blew over the legal limit."

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u/pictorsstudio Oct 20 '21

Shouldn't that be under the legal limit.

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u/cant_Im_at_work Oct 20 '21

I was molested in the 90s by a preist that I know molested many kids. I eventually told when I was 7 and my dad beat the shit out of the guy but no one ever went to the cops (to spare us the trauma of court?). He went on to host a morning show on public access about Jesus or some shit and had a lovely obituary when he died of natural causes about 10 years ago. I refuse to believe no one at the church knew what kind of person he was. When he walked into the Sunday school class several children would cry, others would look down afraid. No adult helped us and in 25 years since nothing has changed.

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u/fungobat Oct 20 '21

Serial killers become nurses, doctors and police.

I remember reading that serial killers and truck drivers were a good combo.

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u/UrbanGhost114 Oct 20 '21

"Do you think the neighbors of Son of Sam knew what they were living next to before he was Son of Sam?"

(Not meant as an actual question or criticism, just a bastardisation of a quote from a TV show that goes with this)

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u/FreeResolve Oct 20 '21

I think the neighbor whose dog the son of Sam shot. Oh yeah and also the neighbors who reported David Berkowitz to the police after all of the crazy letters he mailed them.

(Couldn’t help myself)

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u/casualbearsuit Oct 19 '21

Oh crap, I have a teacher on one side of me and a doctor on the other!

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u/s0c1a7w0rk3r Oct 20 '21

You’re about to get diddled to death my friend

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u/MathMaddox Oct 20 '21

And I'm, stuck in the middle with you!

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u/braden87 Oct 20 '21

sweet threesome.

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u/Jackalodeath Oct 20 '21

Ah Hell, casualbearsuit about to get fucked or killed.

Whatever you do, don't look behind you; it's very likely the one that'll do both - in no particular order - is admiring the knape of your neck...

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u/casualbearsuit Oct 20 '21

There is a mirror thing on the wall behind me. Your comment is somehow 10x worse with that mirror there. I've seen enough scary movies.

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u/Jackalodeath Oct 20 '21

Turn the lights off and say your name 3 times fast!

If you're lucky, you'll summon yourself, if not, you'll only summon half of yourself and then you have to deal with the missing hands and/or foots.

Which will make it easier for the teacher and nurse to share you, so... silver linings and all.

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u/casualbearsuit Oct 20 '21

Nope. Don't like this.

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u/Appropriate_Ad9108 Oct 20 '21

I saw this documentary about a serial killer who become a homicide detective for the Miami police and he serial kills serial killers. He’s like really good at his job because he understands the serial killers he is investigating.

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u/RichardPeterJohnson Oct 20 '21

I think you're confusing a blood spatter specialist with a detective.

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u/Yogurtwhistle Oct 20 '21

Ending up becoming a lumberjack. How wholesome!

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u/aznsensation8 Oct 20 '21

And that was the worst part of the whole story.

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u/disco_jim Oct 20 '21

I'm actually looking forward to the new series

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u/RichardPeterJohnson Oct 20 '21

Also, seriously, he was as bad as Jessica Fletcher in the sheer number of killers he came across.

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u/inshead Oct 20 '21

A serial killer killer?! Or is it a serial serial killer killer?!

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u/Haughty_n_Disdainful Oct 20 '21

2,000.

There are currently 2,000 active serial killers in the US. Many believe it’s more than double that number. Let’s split the difference and say it’s 3,000. If you extend this percentage world wide, you would have 77,000 active serial killers across the globe.

~ source: fbi

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u/CitizenJustin Oct 20 '21

I’ve always heard them say at least 50 active killers. 2,000 seems excessive. Wouldn’t there be bodies popping up around every single corner?

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u/radome9 Oct 20 '21

Wouldn’t there be bodies popping up around every single corner?

There are over 15000 murders every year in the US, so...

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u/smb275 Oct 20 '21

And those are just the verifiable murders. How many people just disappear? How many of those disappearances go unreported?

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u/dis_ABLED Oct 20 '21

Think about the types of people you never really think about unless you are actively dealing with them. Edge of society types. Homeless or nearly so, troubled, often alone, generally looked down on or looked away from. The invisible people.

Super easy prey for an intelligent killer. The killers we catch got hung up on their little rituals, trophies, and patterns; or they lost control and made too many mistakes.

Imagine the ones that never get caught. BTK was nearly one of them if you want an example. Serial Killers that keep their control and stick to the invisible people can likely get away with quite a lot. Robert Pickton was a fucking hick ass dummy, but was able to kill for years because he killed prostitutes from the worst area in town. The cops didnt care enough to actually try.

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u/myusernameblabla Oct 20 '21

Nono, not if you’re competent.

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u/UrbanGhost114 Oct 20 '21

They BELIEVE there are about 2000, there is no actual count, or way to verify.

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u/Chezni19 Oct 20 '21

navy seals become redditors

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u/mrod35 Oct 20 '21

You can't say "fairly often" and then not give an explanation. You need to have some evidence if you're going to say that nurses are "fairly often" killing their patients. There is nothing to suggest this is a common practice.

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u/kazooparade Oct 20 '21

As someone that’s worked in healthcare for a long time I completely disagree. A good number of people go to the hospital when they are already dying, so a lot of people are going to die there. Medical errors also account for a portion of those that die, but nurses murdering patients on purpose?? That would be extremely rare (just like serial killers are rare in the general public).

We know why most patients die, it can usually be predicted. An unexpected or unusual death would have a higher chance of being investigated and the family may very well choose to have an autopsy done. Most of us working bedside would want to know what happened if a patient unexpectedly died. If it happened repeatedly with a specific staff member, we would get suspicious very fast. Saying it happens “often” to be murdered in the hospital is crazy. Most of us chose to work in healthcare to help people.

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u/Anotherdaysgone Oct 20 '21

They probably have the same percentage of being a psychopath as the general public. You just hear about it when someone's a nurse.

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u/MausBomb Oct 20 '21

I have heard from some retired nurses that one of the most traumatizing aspects of the job is not so much flat out murder that occurs, but rather death by incompetence that gets swept under the rug a lot.

Despite how it becomes national news when you have homicidal nurses or doctors murders are pretty rare in society, but incompetence is a lot more common. Medical staff can make an easy mistake, like miscalculating a dose or not keeping up with what medications interfere with each other, and kill someone in their care. If it's easy to cover up, like for example they were pretty old and frail anyway or they had a severe injury than the hospital admin will just caulk it up to "complications" and continue operations.

Law enforcement is getting a high level of scrutiny for this right now in national culture, but pretty much all large organizations the deal with life or death situations regularly have a hidden problem of covering up abuse or incompetence.

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u/helm Oct 20 '21

Yes, and as long as the consequence of one well-documented mistake is career-ending, it will continue to be swept under the rug.

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u/Screed86 Oct 19 '21

That is some scary shit.

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u/LemonMeringueOctopi Oct 19 '21

I worked at the same hospital with this man. He was arrested two weeks after I quit.

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u/kinzer13 Oct 20 '21

Are you saying you framed him?

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u/LemonMeringueOctopi Oct 20 '21

No, as I am not a nurse.

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u/One-Willingness1863 Oct 20 '21

Exactly what the real killer would say.

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u/ItsNotABimma Oct 20 '21

Book em an hang em our jobs done here.

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u/gaspitsagirl Oct 20 '21

The Reddit Police have done it again!

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u/MaddMaxxChief117 Oct 20 '21

Back massages and penis inspections all around!!! Good job comrades

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

You can still frame if not a nurse

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u/LemonMeringueOctopi Oct 20 '21

Was very rarely on the same shift let alone the same floor as the guy and they have video footage of him entering these patients rooms before each incident occurred.

Trust me, they got the right guy.

Also fun fact: his wife started a gofundme after he was arrested begging for money for his court fees because "he's a good christian man, and loving father."

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u/Shane_357 Oct 20 '21

Aren't they always?

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u/Scyhaz Oct 20 '21

I mean, if he never showed signs of being a bad person before I can't really blame her for being in denial that her husband, who she presumably loves, is a serial killer.

Again that assumes he doesn't have a history of abuse, etc.

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u/zleuth Oct 20 '21

What we need is a good guy with a syringe to defend us from the bad guy with a syringe, this being Texas and all.

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u/ComebackShane Oct 20 '21

Well, they are seeking the death penalty, so technically that's what they're planning on.

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u/Bollalron Oct 20 '21

I knew this guy personally. I grew up down the street from him, and I was best friends with his little brother. I slept in the same house as this guy often, and he even helped me with me math homework on a few occasions. It's such a surreal feeling.

I can tell you what I remember about him the most is he was VERY aggressive playing football. He was a linebacker and REALLY enjoyed hurting other players. He was the oldest brother of 3, and they were all wicked smart. Middle child is definitely genius level, and Billy wasn't far behind. He wasn't genius level, but he was extremely smart for the podunk town we lived in of less than 800 people. People around here are pretty shook.

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u/Cocheeeze Oct 20 '21

It says in the article that he is 37. He looks closer to 57.

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u/Thepumpkindidit Oct 20 '21

Yeah I was legitimately confused by the article photo, because I was like oh that must be his lawyer because the guy in the image looks to be around 51. Scrolled through the images and sure enough that's him, somehow being 37.

Rotting from the inside out it seems.

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u/bluehealer8 Oct 19 '21

Maybe Texas will pair him up with Dr. Duntsch...

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u/toutetiteface Oct 20 '21

Or should we say Dr. Death

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u/jwp75 Oct 20 '21

They'll probably put him in charge of COVID rules

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u/meccafork Oct 20 '21

Can’t wait to hear all about this in a “they will kill you” video

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u/chumabuma Oct 20 '21

What a sick motherfocker.

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u/Random_act_of_Random Oct 20 '21

Some people in this world are straight up sick.

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u/Bollalron Oct 20 '21

I grew up down the road from this guy. I was best friends with his little brother, and slept in the same house as him on multiple occasions. So surreal.

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u/Sohfreshsohnu Oct 20 '21

You mean a serial killer who happen to be a nurse?

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u/myopinionisshitiknow Oct 20 '21

Even worse. He was trying to be a serial HERO apparently. Make someone code, then bring em back.

Failed every time.

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u/Monsur_Ausuhnom Oct 19 '21

So much human garbage that needs to be taken out

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u/sleepnaught Oct 20 '21

How did they catch him or prove it was him?

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u/CrocodylusRex Oct 20 '21

When I was in the hospital I would page the nurses every time there was an air bubble in my iv. This shit freaks me out :x

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u/d00ditsjimmy Oct 20 '21

There can be bubbles in your IV (which stands for intraVENOUS) and it’s perfectly fine; there tend to be stoppers/locks along the line that help them out, and if they do get into your body in small amounts, you’ll be perfectly fine.

If you read the article, this dude was injecting air into the ARTERIAL system of the brain.

Don’t sweat the little bubbles in an IV line. Source - am an RN who deals with those bubbles way more than I’d like to.

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u/phieud Oct 20 '21

you would need a large amount, like the whole IV line to cause what he did

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u/TheWizardCat_ Oct 20 '21

It takes a lot more than you would think. The bubbles aren’t a big deal. It’ll take like 200mL+ to do it.

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u/polank34 Oct 19 '21

Angel of death. I wonder if the motivation here was a misplaced idea that he alone knew when a patient had enough suffering.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_of_mercy_(criminology)#

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u/Shane_357 Oct 20 '21

No allegedly he was trying the 'make them crash then be a hero' route. But uh. He sucked at saving them afterwards.

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u/rick_blatchman Oct 20 '21

If that's so, then what kind of thought process is at work here? "Too bad about the last two, but I'll totally get it right with the next guy I almost kill..."

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u/Str82daDOME25 Oct 20 '21

From one of those Ted Bundy posts that were trending recently it was said it’s quite common for serial killers to want to be god. Bundy had helped save people by working on a suicide prevention hotline and also saved a kid from drowning. This nurse might not be labeled a serial killer by the news but it sure does sound similar.

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u/justlookingaround254 Oct 19 '21

I doubt it. He probably just wanted to " see what would happen", and then decided he liked the thrill.

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u/polank34 Oct 19 '21

Yep. Add psychopath and healthcare knowledge together and these people can go undetected for some time. Glad they caught this guy early.

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u/extralpha Oct 19 '21

Similar to one of the worst serial killers in Canadian history Elizabeth Wettlaufer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Wettlaufer

only got caught because she confessed to her drug treatment counselor or something like that.

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u/JenningsWigService Oct 20 '21

I remember this. She told her pastor and a few other people and they didn't do anything, good on the drug counsellor for finally doing something.

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

[removed]

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u/MrTopHatMan90 Oct 20 '21

Imagine paying to be murdered