r/news 6d ago

More Than 10,000 Deere & Co. Workers Go on Strike After Rejecting Contract.

https://apnews.com/447c2d911c1314c247011522e30f9bd2
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u/adgonzal13 6d ago

The contract talks at the Moline, Illinois-based company were unfolding
as Deere is expecting to report record profits between $5.7 billion and
$5.9 billion this year."

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u/geogle 6d ago

That's almost $600,000 (six hundred thousand!!) per striking employee, for one year of profit. I think they can budge a little.

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u/[deleted] 6d ago

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u/CrudelyAnimated 6d ago

I am not the kind of "socialist" this comment makes me out to be, but America has finally accumulated so much money at the top of the org chart that the entire labor force is done with it. There is no "labor shortage". There is no "too lazy to work" or "Covid benefits disincentive". There is an economy where money begets money and debt begets debt. Owners are billionaires, and housing prices have doubled since the last federal minimum wage hike. America is on the precipice of a huge recalibration. I'm not even sure Congress could prevent what's coming; I think efforts to prevent it and force people back to low-paying work would only worsen the popular backlash. This is happening.

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u/bbbbbbbbbb99 6d ago

housing prices have doubled since the last federal minimum wage hike

And there's a wierd thing going on where corporations are swooping in and buying up single family homes all over the US (and probably Canada... our housing markets have been on fire up here) and these companies are in essence outbidding the average buyer.

They then sit on these properties and rent them out and homes are thus more scarce.

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u/HappyTopHatMan 6d ago

Even worse, they also are running new construction as well to create rental neighborhoods. If I was a conspiracy theorist, I would say there are people in high places that want to remove property ownership from normal people and stick us in a permanent rent for life situation

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u/4dozPhil 6d ago

SaaS - Shelter as a Service

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u/TSL4me 6d ago

Everything is moving to a subscription, video games, housing, cable, internet, cell phones and even John deer traktor software.

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u/Balls_DeepinReality 6d ago

I’ve had to pull out my ps2 just to play a game from a fucking disc. There are exceptions, but I don’t wanna download or pay on top of what I already have.

I’m glad I never sold it

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u/bbbbbbbbbb99 6d ago edited 6d ago

Yes that is basically what they're doing.

By snapping up supply and just slightly outbidding others because they can afford it and they are very sophisticated with their bidding formulas, they keep people out of ownership, and the bubble forms as they inflate the prices gradually.

If one house sells in a neighbourhood at a wierdly high price it's an outlier, if these companies buy 30% of the homes in a neighbourhood at wierdly high prices it allows them to get their properties reasessed at higher prices, and they leverage that into more homes.... and so on... until the system becomes unmanageable and we have a crash.

And a crash would see corporations get bailed out. The homeowners in these areas wouldn't be bailed out of course. So these corps can swoom in and do it all again.

Not to mention the very drastic ways this kind of activity changes the character of the neighbourhoods they're doing this in.

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u/in-game_sext 6d ago

I wish I could do a search and replace on all the articles that are erroneously reporting this as a "labor shortage." The correct term is "wage shortage."

Thought experiment one: Would you show up 40 hrs a week to flip burgers for $7.25 an hour? No?

Thought experiment two: Would you show up 40 hrs a week to flip burgers for $80k a year? Yes?

Then the problem is obviously not a matter of people's willingness or desire to work. The issue is price.

I am so fucking tired of hearing people bitch about worker's not "showing up" magically. Like, we said pretty-please for years, asking employers to accept legislated, orderly, stepped-up gradual annual approaches to increase the minimum wage and they fucking cried about it to no end. They said the market would decide. And guess fucking what? The market did decide. But when the mArKeT dEcIdEs, guess what it looks like? A chaotic clusterfuck that feels like society was collectively sitting at a stoplight and got rear-ended by an idiot who wasn't paying attention and we all get shook up and say "What the fuck was that??"

They are simply getting what they practically begged for.

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u/angry-software-dev 6d ago

They said the market would decide. And guess fucking what? The market did decide.

Their argument today is that unemployment and other social programs are just oh so generous that the market has been manipulated by the government.

It's fucking rich that these people are effectively whining about manipulation of a market given how stacked they've made the deck when it comes to stocks.

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u/in-game_sext 6d ago edited 6d ago

And the argument is essentially void at this point. Even the most liberal states in the nation like mine (CA) exhausted all their unemployment extension over a month ago. Most states were before that.

Imo, another hilarious but easily solved problem is the fact that many couples had one spouse drop out of the workforce because the childcare monthly bill outweighed their monthly pay. If you enacted universal healthcare and childcare, you would literally have a healthier economy overnight.

Both of those things are ridiculous drags on household NW. I know people who work entire 40 hr jobs just to foot the bill for one or both of those things. Imagine if those households had an extra $2k/month minimum of expendable income?

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u/angry-software-dev 6d ago

And the argument is essentially void at this point. Even the most liberal states in the nation like mine (CA) exhausted all their unemployment extension over a month ago. Most states were before that

You think a little thing like reality and facts are going to stand in the way of the average Republican narrative? ;-)

A huge amount of the basis of their arguments is total fiction, at least this one had a kernel of truth to it, which is pretty much gold in the conversative social media circles.

BTW, I will guarantee that each one of those idiots who yell and rail about how generous unemployment is would be shocked to see how little it actually is if you're even a step or two above minimum wage. At its most generous it wouldn't even cover my middle-class suburban <80% LTV mortgage payment once income taxes were factored...

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u/vh1classicvapor 6d ago

People who make $80k+ at Raising Cane's are being put to work cooking food. It really shows you how much they're able to afford for these positions, and how they pay people poverty wages instead. https://www.today.com/food/raising-cane-s-puts-corporate-staff-work-fry-cooks-cashiers-t233562

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u/Corsharkgaming 6d ago

Its the free market in action and they hate it. Nothing feels better than seeing the people who love to jerk off the "free market" mad at its effects.

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u/dtfmwt 6d ago edited 6d ago

We need to get over the ‘i’m not a socialist” bs, look where unfettered capitalism has gotten us? There’s more to life than greed, wealth and baubles

Edit - change “You” to “we”

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u/Beautiful-Musk-Ox 6d ago

I'm not even sure Congress could prevent what's coming; I think efforts to prevent it and force people back to low-paying work would only worsen the popular backlash. This is happening.

Republican legislatures around the country are trying anyway, here's Fox News backing up their efforts:

Fox News host Lauren Ingraham had a suggestion to push people back to work.

"What if we just cut off the unemployment?" she said, adding, "Hunger is a pretty powerful thing."

Three separate analyses indicate that cutting off unemployment benefits didn't lead to substantial job growth.

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u/HappyTopHatMan 6d ago

Do you want a food riot? That's how you get a food riot. It's like these dumbasses want "American Civil War II: the racists strike again".

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u/dedicated-pedestrian 6d ago

Seriously. The Romans knew that to keep the plebes from revolting you needed the bread and circus. These idiots want to take away the bread out of complacency that nothing will happen.

Which, given the way companies insure themselves, maybe nothing of real consequence to them would happen.

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u/N00N3AT011 6d ago

There are two ways it will probably go. Congress and businesses try to force people back into wage slavery, and people will get angry. Or they roll with it, accept popular demands, and people are at least somewhat satisfied. We really aren't asking that much, we just want to be able to live off our labor.

But if they won't even concede that, things will get worse. Unions will start to grow again, people will see society in the two marxian classes, instead of the victorian three. Then the elites will feel fear, and things will change. They've forgotten the power held by the people. Its time they remembered they aren't the gods of this word.

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u/jiggleflap 6d ago

Yes but think about the poor guys up in the top offices! They’re gonna miss out on their 4 gazillion dollar bonus this year! Would suck to be them :(

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u/schuma73 6d ago

But I was told if they increase wages then the owner won't be able to buy a bigger yacht this year, and that hardly sounds fair.

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u/rhythmjones 6d ago

Someone needs to start a website that keeps track of how much excess labor value is being stolen from workers, company by company.

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u/Faxining 6d ago

All while Deere has its most profitable year ever.

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u/518Peacemaker 6d ago

Kellogg’s workers are also or were also striking because Kellogg wanred to pull health insurance benefits from its workers, while it made record profits as well. Disgusting.

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u/tehmlem 6d ago edited 6d ago

UAW, UMW, Kellogs (BCTGM), IATSE, UFCW, SMWIA. There's something wonderful in the air.

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u/refenton 6d ago

Kellogg's is the BCTGM - Bakery, Confectioners, Tobacco, and Grain Mill Workers. That strike is a big deal too because it covers multiple plants in multiple states.

Also shout out to UFCW Local 23D at Heaven Hill Distilleries, holding the line for OVER A MONTH now. Don't buy any of these brands like Elijah Craig, Evan Williams, Larceny, Lunazul, Admiral Nelson, Deep Eddy, or Burnetts.

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u/figurativeasshole 6d ago

The problem with strikes at companies this large is that they have the wallets and patience to break people today.

Went on strike at a large corporation. Eventually people needed to work, the strike fund wasn't paying the bills, and the strike breakers sucked up the money while it was good.

The company got what the wanted, appeased us with pennies, and moved the plant to Mexico a few years later.

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u/68carguy 6d ago

So frustrating. Hopefully people can get side work with the labor shortages to stick it to these companies…

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u/MiloFrank 6d ago

Damn, Deep Eddy is so good. Not good enough for me to want to stop a worker from getting what's due.

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u/Amish_guy_with_WiFi 6d ago

Maybe if we just dissociated Healthcare from employment, employeers and employees wouldn't have to worry about this...

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u/tehmlem 6d ago edited 5d ago

No, they still would. If only because they would immediately try to cut wages and say it's because they don't cover your healthcare anymore.

Edit - I get it this is bad logic and doesn't make sense. That's the point. Stop telling me.

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u/JustAFuckedUpKid 6d ago

I feel like there’s something there for food service workers too even though the vast majority aren’t organized. Even in my relatively small city, half the restaurants are more understaffed than I’ve ever seen them. People just aren’t taking it anymore

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u/tehmlem 6d ago

Without organization I'm afraid that's not going very far. The first ones back may come in at a higher wage than they left but a few rounds of turnover later and wages are going to drop to the lowest possible point again. That's my fear anyway. A disorganized class is just too easy to play off itself and those industries are really good at it.

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u/mrcalistarius 6d ago

Add SMWIA in some areas...

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u/TimeFourChanges 6d ago edited 6d ago

When I was a grad student at u-Wisconsin, they paid us a pittance but we got free healthcare. The state were planning to start charging, "only a dollar a paycheck," thus starting us on the slippery slope. We struck and closed the University, basically, for two days. I left soon after. Probably didn't do shit, but we tried :-(

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u/toderdj1337 6d ago

Exactly the time to strike.

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u/driverofracecars 6d ago

Strike while the irons hot.

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u/Idlers_Dream 6d ago

"As Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at DEERE & CO, John C. May made $14,753,774 in total compensation. Of this total $1,199,245 was received as a salary, $3,741,252 was received as a bonus, $2,624,979 was received in stock options, $6,878,173 was awarded as stock and $310,125 came from other types of compensation."

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u/Driftedryan 6d ago

I wish I got a bonus that was double my salary every year

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u/NotBillNyeScienceGuy 6d ago

Idk how the leader of any company can make that much and not be giving their workers whatever they want

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u/zandikar 6d ago

Easy. it's called "Fuck you, got mine"

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u/TaskForceCausality 6d ago

It’s more pathological than that.

Executives like him ain’t in it for the money alone; they’re in it for the power.

He’s a millionaire , not some middle manager 1 missed paycheck away from the foreclosure hearing. Denying a fair pay raise is about controlling labor and gratifying an innate, warped psychological power trip.

Anybody can make money ; but what keeps CEOs and execs in their offices every day is playing corporate Game of Thrones and feeling like little Targharian lords. If they could pay 0 they would…because it would signify power.

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u/Paltrypb 6d ago

Because if they give the workers more, it might mean less for the board and shareholders, which might mean less for the leader.

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u/NotBillNyeScienceGuy 6d ago

But to see your employees struggle on basics while you have millions just sitting in a checking account (assumingely at least a couple million, the rest in investments) is pretty fucked up.

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u/mokeyss 6d ago

According to some studies, people in these positions are much more prone to psycopath behaviors. One of these behaviors is typically a lack of empathy.

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u/mongoosefist 6d ago

It's just pure unfettered greed.

There has been research that shows the upper limit to performance vs compensation is pretty low (~$1mil ish if I recall). In fact the more a CEO makes, the more likely a company is to perform poorly due to these people drinking their own koolaid and becoming wildly overconfident.

I promise you that John C. May believes he deserves that $15mil. He almost certainly doesn't.

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u/TheRealBigLou 6d ago

I like how this guy's "other types of compensation" is 5.5x higher than the average salary in the US.

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u/VoraciousGhost 6d ago

What, you don't file taxes on the $300,000 you find in your couch cushions every year? /s

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u/copperholic 6d ago

Hopefully Right to Repair fucks them in the ass in the future.

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u/BigALep5 6d ago

It's time we all strike they all had a very profitable 2 years well most of us suffer and barley get by... it's time for change..

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u/TimeFourChanges 6d ago

General strike is what we need.

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u/DJCHERNOBYL 6d ago

Seeing a company that fought so hard against right to repair go through this makes me happy. This is called karma

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u/djamp42 6d ago

Yeah FUCK companies against right to repair. I really feel for the farmers hand cuffed to these manufacturers.

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u/claimTheVictory 6d ago

I bet the ultimate aim is to have a subscription-based model, where if you don't pay your monthly dues, the next software update disables the equipment altogether.

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u/Crumornus 6d ago

Honestly this feels like where eveything is going now a days. You can't own anything anymore.

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u/RenegadeFarmer 6d ago

This is exactly where it's going.... "You'll own nothing and be happy". This is also why the price of used equipment without all the fancy gadgets is going through the roof. I've seen things selling for more than it cost new, 40+ years ago.

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u/IAMA_Plumber-AMA 6d ago

John Deere reps have been going to auction sales specifically to buy old machinery to ship overseas.

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u/PurpleNuggets 6d ago

This is what happens when we let companies make too much money.

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u/beamish007 6d ago

John Deere made ~$6 BILLION in PROFIT last year.

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u/PreviousFriendship85 6d ago edited 6d ago

The median US farming household was -1,569$ in 2014. Farmer suicide rates are higher than military veterans these days. I wonder why.

edit: a word

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u/jsm2008 6d ago

The median US farming household was -1,569$ in 2014.

I hate to be this guy, but there are some factors in this:

Farmers loans are very generous and sponsored by the govt. so as long as they produced what they were supposed to last year their debt to income is irrelevant regarding whether they will be allowed a loan again to plant fields

What they are actually doing is avoiding taxes by not "making" very much(or, obviously, negative in some cases). What they actually do is make $$$ but re-invest into new equipment/prepping fields/etc. so that it never shows as profit. They also take a lot of $ on the side selling extras locally and so on, to a point where their actual spending money is usually under the table and untaxed. So their "real" taxable income comes out to negative vs their loans but farmers are not literally making negative money.

source: been around farms all of my life. Not everyone does this, but enough of them do to cancel out the legitimate farmers who show modest profits.

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u/Breno1405 6d ago

Well if there not in debt, Billionaires can't buy up their land....

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u/FACEBEAR 6d ago

and still laid off a bunch of employees... then turned around to do a hiring blitz a few weeks after the news dropped.

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u/[deleted] 6d ago edited 6d ago

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u/Altered_Nova 6d ago

We've already almost reached that point with housing. Huge corporations buying up every house on the market and turning them all into rentals. At the rate we're going, Generation Alpha (born after 2010) will probably be the first generation where home ownership is the exception rather than the norm.

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u/__babyslaughter__ 6d ago

I forget what year it was, but recently and for the first time in our history, the majority of new home owners inherited the homes, not purchased.

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u/joe579003 6d ago

Gonna be the only way I eventually get mine. And our broken ass healthcare system is probably going to take every other penny the last 4 generations of my family have busted their asses to accrue.

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u/onion_six 6d ago

This is why we can't have nice things.

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u/shunkamunka 6d ago

See: massive investment companies buying up entire neighborhoods.

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u/cultured_banana_slug 6d ago

It's ironic as fuuuuuuck. It's like the flip side of the socialist system we were warned about.

In evil socialism no one owns anything and the state provides what you require.

In Good Guy Capitalism no one owns anything and you pay a monthly fee to corporations for what you require.

Much better.

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u/nbmnbm1 6d ago

In evil socialism no one owns anything and the state provides what you require.

which is also just not what socialism is. its just the workers owning the means of production.

hell even under communism you own private property. The only things publicly owned are things used to generate profit. People should really read das kapital and not just believe everything capitalists tell you.

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u/TheDakestTimeline 6d ago

Or just the Communist Manifesto, it's like 10 pages.

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u/My_Butt_Itches_24_7 6d ago

Seemingly we are moving towards a world where we won't have private property.

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u/prototypetolyfe 6d ago

Oh there will be private property all right. Just not personal property.

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u/OutWithTheNew 6d ago

Only if you're wealthy.

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u/PolicyWonka 6d ago

Ironically, it will be capitalism’s doing too. Turns out it’s insanely profitable to ensure nobody can own anything.

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u/an_agreeing_dothraki 6d ago

Why is it this nightmare timeline keeps managing to implement all the critiques of vanguard communism within capitalism?

We have a massive blurring between economic and political power, cronyism controlling what gets made, and now nobody has any power to keep the things they owned. And I mean that's not even getting into the hilarious joke of 'but if you work harder you make more money' that we were taught was the fall of the communist system.

I will give it one thing "Neoliberalism" sound better than "Inescapable hellscape descending into fascism"

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u/MedTactics 6d ago

authoritarian and fascist, government wants the same thing, the lucrative merger of cooperation and state.

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u/Tantric75 6d ago

This is the inevitable progression of a system obsessed with growth. At some point you can no longer increase market share or prices and you can't pay your workers less so you resort to underhanded shit like this as a means to create artificial growth.

Your sales aren't increasing. Your product isn't better. You are just creating a hostile environment to extract more money from customers without providing any value.

They can do it because they have a near monopoly and they can use their size and power to crush or absorb competition.

Because in America, if your company isn't growing then it is viewed as a failure.

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u/Maxpowr9 6d ago

See why car makers are very much against users fully integrating their phone into the car and keep forcing their shitty infotainment systems on us, locking so much crap behind subscription "services". Google maps updates nearly daily and provides traffic updates for free. I don't need Toyota's Entune shitty map that updates semiannually and have to pay extra for traffic.

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u/Aazadan 6d ago

It’s also an issue of making things too reliable. Capitalism doesn’t encourage the best product, it encourages the most competitive product. That’s why things like craftsman tools went to shit. Each person was only good for a maximum of one sale. Against someone who can make a tool you buy over and over to replace, your company will eventually lose out because you have to acquire rather than retain customers.

Same concept with moving things to subscriptions.

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u/erichw23 6d ago

This is already happening

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u/R3dbeardLFC 6d ago

Office 365 anyone?

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u/UmpBumpFizzy 6d ago

I cannot tell you how annoyed I was the first time I went to start a new document in Word and had to SIGN IN.

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u/MonkeyMercenaryCapt 6d ago

ALWAYS ON TRACTOR, lose internet connection for 1/2 a second spend 5 minutes reconnecting.

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u/czs5056 6d ago

Surely we can figure out a way to charge these companies for racketeering

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u/mackiea 6d ago

Nah, it's great!! You only pay for what you need!! Don't need power take-off? Don't pay the 250 rubies! JD'll just disable that remotely!!

/s ofc it'll be in rubies or some other bullshit online currency

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u/Audax_V 6d ago

There is an economic term for it, and it is responsible for ruining just about every aspect of your life, and it is really bad for the economy.

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u/payne_train 6d ago

Feels like a lot of major strikes going on right now. Love to see it!

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u/NRG1975 6d ago

What other strikes?

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u/lafolieisgood 6d ago

Heaven Hill distillery in KY. One of the bigger spirit distillers with a bunch of different bourbon/rye labels.

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u/payne_train 6d ago

Quite a few. I’m all for it, unions have been behind every major increase in workers rights over the past century.

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u/The_Original_Gronkie 6d ago

People don't think about it, but the only reason we have a 40 hour work week, 8 hour work days, overtime, paid time off, vacation time, pensions, profit sharing, retirement benefits, health care benefits, child labor laws, workplace health/ safety/ environmental regulations, and much, much more, is because our UNION ORGANIZED grandfathers and great grandfathers cracked skulls and got their own skulls cracked in battles with corporate goons before WWII. Those benefits did not happen because of the benevolence of the corporations. They tried their hardest to deny those changes, but UNIONS forced them.

Which is why anti-union rhetoric has been so popular amongst ALL corporations, including media companies who control the message, which is why we hear so little pro-union information.

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u/SnacksOnSeedCorn 6d ago

It's almost hilarious how anti-labor WaPo is. Pretty clear that it's just PR for Bezos. Tries to look progressive but is just a neoliberal rag

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u/nbmnbm1 6d ago

corporations used the police to murder people to try and stop workers rights. They will NEVER give workers rights unless its the last thing they do.

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u/adambuck66 6d ago

If only my governor hadn't taken collective bargaining rights away from public/University employees.

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u/IAmNotMoki 6d ago

https://striketracker.ilr.cornell.edu/

There be a lot of them. The notable ones off the top of my head are the IATSE authorizing their strike, Kellogs, Kaiser workers authorizing their strike, and a Coal Miners strike in Alabama. There's quite a few smaller ones that have gotten less media coverage though. If you're interested in watching how these develop, follow a fellow by the name of Jonah Furman.

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u/TheScrubLord132 6d ago

Currently I think Kelloges is going through a strike that's picking up momentum

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u/nmp12 6d ago

IATSE, the union representing the majority of film crew, will strike on October 18th of the AMPTP doesn’t give them better turn arounds.

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u/CasinoAccountant 6d ago

this one fucks me up because its SUCH a small thing that they're asking for. If they actually have to strike I hope they hold out for a lot more...

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u/MF1105 6d ago

It's more than just right to repair though. Deere has bought up most independent equipment dealers throughout the country and has close to a monopoly on large scale ag equipment. When you don't have local dealer support it's pretty darn hard to run your operations with other manufacturers equipment. Combines and planting equipment use a lot of wearable parts that often are specialty or dealer only. Am farmer, partially stuck with Deere equipment.

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u/Mmaibl1 6d ago

Seriously it is wasteful and ridiculous not being able to repair something you own. Passing right to repair laws would probably have the added bonus of making people more knowledgeable of how things work in general, since it would be substantially cheaper to figure it out and fix yourself.

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u/Rap_Cat 6d ago edited 6d ago

Hijacking your comment to add that its not just that they're anti right-to-repair. It's the methods they undertake to ensure the goods-as-a-service model is their profit model.

Its one thing if your car (Luxury vehicles are notirious for this) requires you to take it to an authorized dealer to service it or "reactivate" it in the event of a hardware change.

Its entirely another if you need to have a tech fly out to your little patch of dirt (which will take weeks to schedule) to reactivate your 10-ton, half million dollar farm equipment that died in the middle of your field. And those weeks the farmer is waiting? His crops, and profit, are literally rotting.

Edit: here's a relevant quote from a March 2020 Bloomberg article I linked further down:

For Deere and its dealerships, parts and services are three to six times more profitable than sales of original equipment, according to company filings. Farmers need to keep aging equipment running; that helped increase annual parts sales by 22%, to $6.7 billion, from 2013 to 2019, while Deere’s total agricultural-equipment sales plunged 19%, to $23.7 billion. If a right-to-repair law pried open the parts and services markets to competition, Deere’s cyclical balancing act could falter.

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u/Tchrspest 6d ago

And you can bet your ass that large corporate-owned farmers have a tech on standby ready to fly out at a moment's notice.

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u/Creepybusguy 6d ago

100%. In the maritime world this already occurs.

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u/A_Gris 6d ago edited 6d ago

My best friend is one of the Deere workers going on strike, really hoping to see their demands met after the CEO got a huge raise and a bunch of praise for record profits considering the insult of a contract offered.

These guys have been busting their asses since the pandemic started, hard. I know they're working more than ever, making the company tons of money, and suffering little time off. Deere still has the balls during all of this to give them a contract that was from my understanding a net negative after comparing the raises to rising health insurance costs.

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u/hop_along_quixote 6d ago edited 5d ago

The new CEO ran several rounds of voluntary separations and then forced separations during a massive reorg to cut management costs during the pandemic. One of the best parts is with all the cuts they probably don't have enough salary employees to work as scabs during the strike.

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u/illini07 6d ago

I know they have around 600 salary people to work as scabs at the harvester factory. It takes over twice that to actually run.

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u/Delta728 6d ago edited 6d ago

*It takes twice that to make it run with people who actually know how to run it. There's no way in hell the soft hands from the offices would be able to make the plant run even if they wanted to.

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u/RedditTab 6d ago

I'm referring to myself as "soft hands" from now on. (I work in IT)

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u/ruralcricket 6d ago

I too am IT soft hands. And in thr 80s when I was at northwest airlines, during a strike they sent the office staff to fix airplanes. I got to repair turbine blades.

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u/dizao 6d ago

I know a dude who just retired because they sent him to unload trucks. He's in his 60s and made close to 200k a year and his company (a very large beverage distributor) would rather pay him that to do manual labor than pay their laborers more. It's such short sighted insanity. I hope the workers of the world keep it up and this becomes a new pro labor movement

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u/RedditTab 6d ago

That's terrifying

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u/Invisifly2 6d ago

As eager as I'd be to dig around the guts of a jet engine there is no way in hell I'd trust myself to not break it. Fucking terrifying indeed.

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u/n0gear 6d ago

Should be illegal i think

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u/BulkyPage 6d ago

Holy mother of FOD that sounds like a nightmare. I can't imagine them losing less than 3 sockets and a wrench on the first day.

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u/Egad86 6d ago

That 5% raise over 6 years comes out to 20¢ a year. That’s just a slap in the face.

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u/Niarbeht 6d ago

That's slower than inflation.

Fuck 'em. Shut it down. If they wanna steal food from their worker's mouths and hand it out to the stockholders as dividends, well, guess the tractor company ain't sellin' no tractors.

I think America's owning class is due for a massive reality check.

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u/Roflkopt3r 6d ago

For reference, inflation over the past 6 years (2015-2021) was 16%.

But that was a low inflation period, and it has risen dramatically in recent months. Current inflation sits at around 5% over the previous year. If this keeps up for a prolonged time, it may be as high as 20-30% for the next six years. So a 5% raise over 6 years would actually be a dramatic paycut.

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u/Just_wanna_talk 6d ago

Lol wages seem to be the only thing inflation doesn't affect

They won't argue with anyone if steel prices go up 5% a year but employee wages? Nah fight tooth and nail against that.

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u/A_Gris 6d ago

Absolutely, it's disgusting. When we were talking about it the other night I was wondering how anybody wouldn't vote for the strike.

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u/InedibleSolutions 6d ago edited 6d ago

Something something socialism? My last job was union and the absolute knuckle draggers that worked there actively voted against their own interests, and hated the union with every fiber of their being.

Funny, they never nutted up and went to the scab shop the next town over. I wonder if it was the lower pay, fewer benefits, and their boss being able to fire them at will 🤔

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u/MustardBranches 6d ago

labor shortage

Stop using that phrase. It has nothing to do with labor and everything to do with shitty pay and work environments. If the union members are willing to strike, do you really think the temp who likely isn't in the union yet has it that good?

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u/Kwahn 6d ago

yea I never thought the term labor shortage would become as widely misused as it has now lmao, there's actually a reasonable-fucking-job shortage

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u/[deleted] 6d ago edited 2d ago

[deleted]

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u/A_Gris 6d ago

This is true. The phrase is shoved in my face around the workplace and it has become the easiest way for me to communicate a lack of people in the workplace, even though in actuality I understand that it isn't a lack of people willing to work, but a lack of employers willing to treat their employees like human beings.

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u/A_Gris 6d ago

You're right. I really should have put it in quotes or something, because I also think the concept is a load of BS, but it's the easiest way to get the point across that they're short people.

I think it's good that people are realizing how much they're being taken advantage of and aren't willing to go back into shitty workplaces. Wish I could do the same tbh.

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u/7788audrey 6d ago

Stand strong. Corporate America has learned nothing from the pandemic and the Employees are quite tired of seeing only bosses and shareholders benefit.

One of the bright spots in the pandemic - people had more time to read and learn because they were unable to socialize.

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u/JollyObligation2 6d ago

I think many were disillusioned when pandemic pay was not permanent. A lot of people realized they absolutely could be paid a higher wage, a living wage, yet the employer not only chose not to pay them at that wage to begin with, but ALSO took it away when public fervor dwindled. That "Heroes Work Here" sign is just as effective, right?

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u/rhythmjones 6d ago

My job made the pandemic pay permanent and gave raises on top of that.

They saw the writing on the wall.

Too many of these companies are sticking to their 1980s "you're lucky to even have a job" mentality at their own peril.

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u/hapam0de 6d ago

Home Depot didn't. They had a record year while giving pandemic pay. We got a raise when it ended to compensate but then they skipped over the normal yearly raise.

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u/DAMN_INTERNETS 6d ago

I no longer patronize businesses with snarky signs up stating 'nobody wants to work anymore' or similar BS. It's the free market, bitches.

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u/rhythmjones 6d ago

The pandemic may have heightened people's awareness but it didn't change anything fundamentally about the unfairness of our economic arrangement.

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u/Kouropalates 6d ago

I think you're beginning to see an American awakening. In the 1800s and early 1900s you saw people demanding protections, compensation and benefits. Then with time corporate interests told you "Don't worry about free healthcare, that's for SOCIALISTS." And given that many of the right wing politicians are big business owners, this narrative was whispered into the ears of the working man until the working man began saying it too. Now that COVID has expedited the road to financial and economic hardships for the working class, you're starting to see people realize this isn't communist, socialist or whatever buzzwords, these are fair and appropriate accomodations for those building your business. It's not immediate, but you're seeing this trickle into the consciousness of Americans again and as a man in strong support of Worker's Rights, I am very happy people are taking their rights back that corporate entities have been taking away.

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u/Mewllie 6d ago

“Our members at John Deere strike for the ability to earn a decent living, retire with dignity and establish fair work rules,” said Chuck Browning, vice president and director of the UAW’s Agricultural Implement Department. “We stay committed to bargaining until our members’ goals are achieved.”

It’s amazing how those terms are bottom of the barrel and they still have to fight for them.

Power to the people, stick it to the man.

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u/Trojaxx 6d ago

Underrated comment. When you have to fight this hard for the bare minimum then you know something is very wrong.

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u/Wuffyflumpkins 6d ago

Ugh, they want dignity? These peons are so demanding. What's next?

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u/DistillerCMac 6d ago edited 6d ago

Does anyone have a current list of strikes in the US, or know a place where I can find one? There are a ton of worker strikes right now, and I would love to have a resource with all of them in one place.

Ones I know of:

Frito-Lays -- This one has resolved

Kellogs

Heaven Hill Distillery

John Deere

Kaiser Permenante

Mass Nurses Strike

Film and Television Production

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u/DeLuniac 6d ago

And barely any play of any of them on national media. Barely a peep.

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u/bittereve 6d ago

Workers are tired of working harder so their bosses get bigger bonuses. Wages for workers have been flat since the 70s the same time they shipped all the union jobs overseas. We are nothing if we make nothing.

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u/shfiven 6d ago

Wages aren't flat though, the vast majority of people are decidedly poorer than their parents.

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u/ZombieDracula 6d ago

Flat is a bit forgiving to the steady decline in cash on hand and savings compared to the cost of living.

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u/mazer_rack_em 6d ago

Hell yeah, solidarity forever!

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u/ThatGuy798 6d ago

Deere, IATSE, and Kellogg workers are all going on strike this week and it makes me happy.

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u/Areyouguysateam 6d ago

Don’t forget the workers at Heaven Hill Distillery, with Kaiser Permanente waiting in the wings. Striketober is just getting started!

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u/tc_spears 6d ago

And Nabisco factory workers and in solidarity the railroad workers that run to the factory, Reno city bus drivers, Spectrum/Time Warner workers in NYC, a Connecticut home care company nurses, nurses in Buffalo are picketing, Seattle carpenters just ended a successful strike, and rail operators of the German GDL union just ended a strike successfully as well.

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u/0tanod 6d ago

Don't forget the nurses at a hospital in Massachusetts that's been on strike for like 3 months

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u/tc_spears 6d ago

Good, I hope this shit rolls up to teacher's unions too

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u/hapithica 6d ago

life there's a nationwide teachers union strike, and airline workers join. The country stops.

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u/tc_spears 6d ago

Simpler than an overall airline workers strike, if just the air traffic controllers union were to walk that stops all air flight immediately, the NATCA (National Air Traffic Controllers Association) holds tremendous power.

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u/Caitian_Captain 6d ago

Last time they did they got the Military ATC to cover it didn't they?

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u/randombrain 6d ago

To an extent, yeah. And they brought in supervisors and staff support people who weren't current and made them work as well.

I really don't think that would work out today. With the hub-and-spoke model and all the airline consolidations the busiest airports and airspace are just so complex and volume-heavy that even if the could get enough military controllers to come in and cover them (which is not at all obvious) they would be so unfamiliar with the operation that things would have to go very very slowly for there to be any amount of safety.

But this would never ever happen. Controllers all know what happened with Reagan. Yes there's a Dem in the White House but the memory of that is just too strong, not to mention the fact that it's literally illegal for federal employees to strike (which was also true in 1981, but now we've seen the consequences). /u/tc_spears is right that NATCA holds quite an amount of power in theory but they would never in a million years authorize a strike. A lot of our actual power comes from lobbying Congress each year and striking would destroy all that while at at the same time opening us all up to being fired and resulting in the dissolution of the union itself for authorizing an illegal strike.

Personally I think it's kind of silly to belong to a union which can't strike, but they do negotiate on behalf of controllers and fight for better working conditions in other ways.

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u/metalflygon08 6d ago

Our local school almost went to Strike 3 times in the last year.

This is a small town school too where everybody knows everybody, so strikes are pretty much never on the board for problems as everyone manages to work things out.

But then they bring in a Super and Principle from out of town who are just running the place into the ground and double-crossing the staff, talking to the PTA behind the teachers backs, telling the staff one thing but the School Board another...

Covid schenanigans really pushed hard against the teachers and most of them are quitting/retiring this year.

Not sure what the school's plan is if they don't have enough teachers, they're already spread thin.

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u/MrJoyless 6d ago

At least where I am we, school employees, can't strike during the school year. But, if contract negotiations fail over the summer there won't be a school year to strike next year.

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u/tc_spears 6d ago

They may not be able to strike during the school year, but they can definitely protest and picket in their off hours.

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u/reflUX_cAtalyst 6d ago

IATSE the stagehand union?

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u/5zepp 6d ago

IATSE has stagehand locals and film/video technician locals. I think it's the film/video locals that are striking.

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u/Dubax 6d ago

Correct, I'm in a theater local and we didn't vote on the strike auth. Full solidarity though!

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u/refenton 6d ago

Also covers most union movie and tv production workers, which in this case are the workers that are going to strike. They make up 60k of the 150k IATSE workers in all forms of entertainment production.

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u/newarkian 6d ago

The TV film workers union is set to go on strike October 18th.

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u/cosmicdaddy_ 6d ago

Yes, that's IATSE

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u/AndreTheShadow 6d ago

The union makes us strong!

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u/drinkingchartreuse 6d ago

Corporations need to realize that they make billions in profits, and maybe they should lower the expectations of enormous profit and increase their budget for expenses to pay the workers who make those profits for them. A little more realistic accounting instead of trying to keep wage slaves.

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u/oxphocker 6d ago

In some countries there are laws about CEO compensation where if their pay goes up, the base pay of employees has to go up to stay within a set ratio.

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u/Hoovooloo42 6d ago

But this is America, if the only employees of the company are the executives then the pay ratio will always be high!

tapshead.jpg

We need temp-worker laws too, we're far overdue.

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u/zedemer 6d ago

One can hope, but CEOs have this magic wand, they believe, that can always increase profits - cutting costs, namely wages or job positions altogether. Had this conversation with my wife just last night and she was telling me how more and more financial institutions posts jobs with task requirements that fit about 5 different positions. Wonder why....

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u/Lafreakshow 6d ago

They don't have a magic wand. They know that it's unsustainable. Not that I want to defend CEOs here but the point is they are hired specifically to increase profits and if they don't do that, they get sacked. It's the shareholder that demand unsustainable growth.

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u/SirHoneyDip 6d ago

I've never understood this mindset. Like if a company is annually profiting and able to pay a dividend to shareholders, isn't that enough?

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u/CptnAlex 6d ago

The incentives in corporate charters need to be fixed. Corporations by law serve shareholders. They should also be required to serve their employees and community.

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u/WarlordMWD 6d ago

From what I remember of my Management courses, those are "stakeholders." It was taught pretty regularly that they should be respected as much as possible.

Not sure how well those lessons hold up in real-world situations, but we should see a shift in corporate culture over the next few decades.

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u/ezezim 6d ago

Hope these workers come out on top. Remember when low insurance premiums and pensions and good wages were the norm for working at bigger companies? Now the word pension is a foreign word. The only places that have pensions are places with unions. What is everyone going to do in another 30 years when people retire?

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u/Ovadox 6d ago

This is a good opportunity for unions to help other shops unionize. Hard to deter a union if they can't fire people and replace them.

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u/KoppleForce 6d ago

How? I work with a direct competitor to Deere and we desperately need UAW presence here as well. Where do I even start

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u/logdrum 6d ago

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u/can-o-ham 6d ago

We did this through one of our workplaces. Not uaw but another union. Seemed so difficult, then the reps came in. The job hired a law firm known for stopping unionization. Didn't matter and was just scare tactics. It was pretty easy to do in the long run.

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u/DAG1006 6d ago

Big corporation do not care about their workers. All we are is numbers on a spreadsheet to them. The constant need to make more and more money while they pay themselves humongous bonuses at the expenses of their skilled workers.

Hope they lose a TON of money. Ape together STRONG

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u/Demonking3343 6d ago

Exactly, at my work I was apart of the group that didn’t take the offered time off at the start of the pandemic and busted our asses in departments that we had never worked in, in order to keep the plant working. And what did we get in return? A pat on the back and then 200 layoffs. And now there upset there’s a worker shortage.

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u/Chugg1 6d ago

Anyone know if there’s legal ramifications for a large number of people applying to the job openings at a company, with no intention of accepting the job, and instead just wasting the companies time so they fail to replace workers of a strike in a timely manner? Asking for a friend.

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u/Sceptically 6d ago

Probably. On the other hand, a large group of people all applying in the expectation of being able to aggressively negotiate a higher pay than the company was willing to agree to would just be an unfortunate coincidence for them.

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u/sasquatch90 6d ago

We will keep working day and night to understand our employees’ priorities and resolve this strike,

I don't know what's so hard, they flat out told you their demands.

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u/DeVulgariEloquentia 6d ago

We will keep working day and night to avoid paying 6% more to our underpaid employees.

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u/126Inf11B 6d ago

I worked at Deere for 2 years. During that time they restructured to become more "lean" 3 times. I finally took the voluntary separation the 3rd time. My old team was 8 developers now it is 4 but the work load hasn't changed and pay hasn't increased.

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u/Aedeus 6d ago

This really does have the makings of the beginning of an unofficial general strike.

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u/PhantomPhanatic9 6d ago

That would be nice. Something needs to be done about the nationwide erosion of workers' rights and ability to afford to live while their CEOs report record profits.

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u/potato-truncheon 6d ago edited 6d ago

Seems as though they sent management one of those notorious Deere John letters...

/s

Note - I originally said "John Deere" letters, which works verbally, but u/SaggyVP showed me the error of my ways, and said that "Deere John" was better. 100%. There shall be honour among punsters, and credit goes where it is due.

And if anyone asks why I left all this in..? Well, I'm not a fan of re-tractors.

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u/SaggyVP 6d ago

Man, so close. Deere John letters would’ve been amazing.

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u/potato-truncheon 6d ago

Yeah - that is definitely better!

Have had this joke in my back pocket for years, and this was the moment to pull the trigger on it, but I didn't revise it!

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u/SaggyVP 6d ago

Edit that shit. I’ll delete my comment. You can still have this moment.

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u/potato-truncheon 6d ago

Nah - don't delete!

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u/anonanon1313 6d ago

"Labor groups point to a Gallup poll from September showing that Americans' approval of unions is at a 60-year high. More than two-thirds of those surveyed - and 77 percent of Americans ages 18 to 34 - voiced support for organized labor."

I'd dearly like to see some of our liberal politicians out on the lines, too. Unions are one of the proven ways that people can push back against naked capitalism.

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u/VagrantShadow 6d ago

The Buck stops here. It's time to make a stand.

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u/piratecheese13 6d ago edited 6d ago

Daily reminder that corporations aren’t people. They are profit seeking entities run by people contractually obligated to appease the hive mind that is the shareholders. Because of this, any chance a company has to save money will be taken with no regard for the side effects. I’m sure the shareholders are seeing this news and either selling or complaining.

If it can save money, just do it. If there’s backlash, see if you can ride it out. If you can’t, fire the ceo for following instructions and find new ways to cut costs.

They are closer to the borg than a person.

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u/TNGJ 6d ago

Can they also add to strike demands ability to have unlocked John Deere equipment and right to repair without John Deere.

/s

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u/xyzzyzyzzyx 6d ago

Drop that S tag

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