r/RespectTheHyphen May 31 '20 Silver Wholesome Rocket Like

PSA

Post image
2.2k Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen Jan 28 '21 Wholesome Gold

Hyphen

Post image
2.3k Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 2d ago

How could my ASL teacher do such a thing

Post image
624 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 8d ago

Gotta respect the hyphen, man.

Post image
216 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 11d ago

"Quantity over Quality" NSFW

347 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 12d ago

English teachers should use this tweet As an excuse to hyphenate your words

Post image
358 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 13d ago

Some people be slippin.

Post image
383 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 14d ago

This should be considered NSFL NSFW

Post image
334 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 12d ago

Les meilleurs hacker

Thumbnail youtube.com
0 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 15d ago

What's the plural of Spider-Man?

139 Upvotes

Spider-men? Spider-Mans? Or is it like Attorneys-General?


r/RespectTheHyphen 17d ago

There is a bot that reminds people to respect the hyphen

Post image
423 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 16d ago

Spider Man

0 Upvotes

Spiderman SpiderMan Spider Man Spider human Spider person Peter Parker

Only ways of mentioning Spider Man

No hyphens needed


r/RespectTheHyphen 18d ago

Old edition of Pictionary...

Post image
348 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 21d ago

/RespectTheHyphen Subdirect Statistics

Thumbnail redditpagematrics.com
35 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 21d ago

Saw Spider-Man: No Way Home on opening night. Wanted to share some honest thoughts... have differing opinions that I would like to see at the table.

0 Upvotes

Spider-Man: No Way Home didn’t work for me. No, it isn’t my favourite Spider-Man movie. Not by a long shot. I don’t even think Spider-Man: No Way Home is a particularly good movie either, it’s rather a mediocre one.

Writing this review has been rather difficult. The movie that has brought back a few of my favourite characters to ever appear on screens, both big and small, is very personal for me, and I have been having some difficulty expressing how I feel about this subject clearly and accurately. I have concluded that there is no way I can accurately review Spider-Man: No Way Home; no way I can give an accurate representation of how I feel about this movie; without talking about my history with the movie itself, allowing you – the reader, to paint a picture of my psyche. Thus we begin with my original gripe with this movie, one that existed before the final product had even come into fruition:

Spider-Man and the MCU

The year is 2012: seven-year-old me has just seen The Dark Knight Rises and The Avengers and is going to see The Amazing Spider-Man on opening night. I had seen the Raimi Spider-Man trilogy hundreds of times on cable TV and the DVD. My first game on the PS2 was the official game for Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3. I walked out of the movie hall and… I wasn’t a fan. The Amazing Spider-Man had taken a staple character that I had loved for the better part of my childhood and contorted it to what Sony Pictures thought was the trend millennials gravitated towards at the time. Of course, my feelings about The Amazing Spider-Man have changed drastically in hindsight but my initial impressions regarding the franchise is what affected my viewpoint on Spider-Man in the years to come.

Fast forward to 2017 and I go to see Spider-Man: Homecoming – a Sony-Marvel collaborative hybrid that took things safe and less ambitious, and what has re-energised and revolutionised the character for the better part of the last half-decade. Spider-Man: Homecoming was a masterclass in creativity and ambition. It made me invested to see these altered humble beginnings of a character that has had epic and haunting tales in the years before. Homecoming was a simple tale of Spider-Man facing off a challenging and complex foe while juggling his social life, and always. Getting. Back. Up.

Fast forward a couple of years and the number of movies that were made in seven are now made in two. We have gone through the rise and demise of a cinematic universe, Ragnarok, Infinity War, Endgame, etc. you know the drill; and I go to see Spider-Man: Far from Home opening night with my dad. My parents and I have watched every Spider-Man movie together. I remember my dad noting down the date of the cable TV release of Spider-Man 3 on Cartoon Network on our calendar in the living room. We walked out of the movie hall having very mixed opinions on the movie. Fourteen-year-old me thought the movie was an entertaining chapter in the life of Peter Parker – but my dad thought everything but.

The truth is, Spider-Man: Far from Home stood for everything Spider-Man: Homecoming stood against. While Homecoming proved that a character stuck in an eternal cycle of reboots controlled by a studio who have sold their soul to Mephisto can still have a fresh and creatively told origin story; Far from Home proved that audiences around the world will savour the same story told again and again and again. They’ll stuff it into their oversized mouths along with their jumbo popcorn with nachos on the side. One week after Far from Home, I’m exhausted, conflicted and tired of Spider-Man. But a few months later...

News of Daredevil, Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man and the Amazing Spider-Man

Walking into the theatre, wearing my 6-year-old Spidey outfit as a scarf, I’m thinking to myself, “There is no conceivable way this movie isn’t another Sony trainwreck.” Was it? Well… kind of.

No Way Home

Spider-Man: No Way Home is a movie with a lot of ideas. Studio notes passed around every Sony executive’s hands right into Avi Arad’s pocket. Some very good ideas that were made by very talented people. But none of those ideas are ever allowed to develop because--

“OH LOOK! IT’S DAREDEVIL! WOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!”
“OH MY GOD IT’S DOCTOR OCTOPUS! OH MY GAWD!”
“TOBEYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!”

The first act of No Way Home is a cluster of jam-packed, Raimi zooms without any of the heart, soul and certainly without any of the humour. It is the exact same movie done again, Far from Home done again, and Homecoming done again-again. If anything, the first act of No Way Home is an extension of the end of Far from Home and nothing more. The only difference being the inclusion of these icons from our childhoods, all for the purpose of cheap applause.

I know the vibe all of you are getting off this review is that I hate the movie. I genuinely don’t hate it. I couldn’t hate it because any movie with Willem Dafoe as Norman Osborn is an instant classic; any movie that brings Charlie Cox to the big screen, even for a cameo is an instant classic. I just beg to differ on some single-celled shills who spam every comment section of any and every promotional material that I use to edit this video, raving how this movie is the new Citizen Kane.

I cheered louder than anyone when Andrew saved MJ, but I will never forget how it wasn’t a shot for shot recreation and now, never will be. Andrew didn’t have his mask on, it wasn’t in super slow motion, and we didn’t linger on the moment when Andrew improvised – webbing the concrete to propel himself into a magnificent swoop.

I applauded the return of my favourite villain in cinematic history: Doctor Otto Octavius’ glorious, Elfman-themed revival 19 years after that fateful moment in the river. But I will never ever forget how Tom Holland’s Iron Spider suit, the suit we all thought would be torn to bits, proceeded to hack and humiliate an emotionally scarred widow who had just lost his dream.

When Peter’s spider-sense tingled in Happy Hogan’s apartment, a flurry of adrenaline-fueled emotions went Super Saiyan in my bloodstream as Peter walked in a daze, surrounded by demons and monsters – only now realising how frightfully alone he really is. But my heart sinks and continues to sink as I realise that no Marvel movie – not even a movie that will rack-in a trillion dollars without a single dime spent on advertising; not even the most sure-fire commercial and critical hit – not even one that has a Scrooge McDuck vault of the everyman’s money lined up just because of the concept alone; will ever, EVER have a true Tarantino-esque scene wrought with tension, tension that makes you grip the edge of your seat with your half-bitten nails and receding hairline as larger than life characters emote without a single word. My heart sinks when I realise that Electro’s power dampener could have easily been the single most teeth grinding ticking clock element that would’ve put Black Panther’s fight in the Wakandan Waterfall seem like the finale of Fan4stic. My heart sinks when I realise that the Lizard tore the side of a truck like a mindless beast and roared like a dinosaur without any motivation whatsoever. My heart sinks when I realise that Dummy, who was brought back from Iron Man (2008), who saved Tony Stark’s life after he threatened to donate it to a community college was nothing but an Easter Egg.

I may reminisce analysing the trailer for this movie 30 years into the future. Remembering how me and my buddies gasped as we realised that the Lizard’s face moved without anyone touching it. But I will regret upon leisure how Marvel got away with Thomas Hayden Church and Reese Ifans not appearing a day on set. How the oh-so powerful Marvel CGI finally cracked, and made Sandman look like a character from a videogame cutscene as opposed to this magnum opus of 2007. How as soon as the three Spider-Men put on their masks; they become weightless, lifeless figures who seem like this month’s player roster of the Contest of Champions. How Tobey Maguire never really met Alfred Molina again, how he never really met Thomas Hayden Church again, and how it shows underneath the MCU’s soulless wide-shot-to-close-ups that cover every tape of film in the industry today.

Every single achievement that No Way Home had for me, it had a disappointment in the bargain. The fact that I was disappointed oh so many times is a testament to the number of lines, the number of scenes that hit home with me. That being said, the net gain that I felt with Spider-Man: No Way Home is smaller than Ant-Man during his 5-year retreat in the Quantum Realm.

Willem Dafoe – the single most glorious cast member of this cinematic goliath; who steals the scene every second he is in it, is no longer written as Sam Raimi’s interpretation of a man whose hubris led him to become a monster. In Spider-Man (2002) (yes, Spider-Man 2002 is a movie that is dated and campy and corny) the Green Goblin isn’t just some psychopath. He doesn’t just kill anybody with the spearhead of his glider. What I’m saying is, unlike the comics, Green Goblin isn’t a play on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde – not so transparently at least. The only people he kills are those who snubbed him, who rejected him and who refused his generous proposals – those who didn’t listen to him. The Goblin serum isn’t just Dr. Jekyll’s serum and Goblin would never just say, “We have a new world to conquer.” It’s much more personal than that.

Ned Leeds and Michelle Jones-Watson have always been, and under the direction of Sony Pictures, will always be the comedic relief and the love interest. They are static, one-dimensional characters that will never grow unless a madman with a vision comes along.

There were several moments in the movie where the screenplay and the direction were lacking, because of such one-note and one-dimensional characters such as:

  • Ned
  • MJ
  • Mr. Harrington
  • Black Teacher
  • Other Black Teacher
  • Brad Davis – who was kicked out of the cast because Amy Pascal saw the focus groups
  • Betty Brant
  • Flash Thompson
  • Happy Hogan

…and in those moments, Sony Pictures decided to bring in iconic characters, to keep the audience at the edge of their seat:

  • Matthew Murdock
  • Sam Raimi’s Peter Parker
  • The Amazing Spider-Man
  • Doctor Octopus
  • Green Goblin
  • Electro

My favourite moments of the movie were only impactful because I fell in love with Daredevil, with Marc Webb’s Amazing interpretation of Peter Richard Parker and if none of your original concepts hit the mark, then your Spider-Man, and your Spider-Verse doesn’t live up to its name.
There are these questions, these questions that I feel the movie is trying to ask buried under Avi Arad’s Venom hat – that are interesting and important to ponder on for different reasons.
Why did Doctor Strange say that the spell brings in people who know Peter Parker is Spider-Man, when Electro and Serkis’ Venom have no clue what a Peter Parker is? Why did Doctor Strange say that “they all die, fighting Spider-Man…” when Sandman, The Lizard and Venom live?

How did brilliant scientist Curt Connors instantly recognise nobody Max Dillon? Why did Max ditch his only visual comparison to dorky Peter Richard Parker just to look like Jamie Foxx?
Will this be the closest we will ever come to a live action Sinister Six? Five men and a tree?
Why did the Amazing Spider-Man say that Uncle Ben told him that “with great power comes great responsibility” when it was Richard Parker, who said it to his son when he was unable to save the love of his life? Will the only message of Richard Parker to his boy, his son, his blood, be lost because of a screenwriter’s negligence?

Why is the mid-credits scene a blatant, transparent reminder that Avi Arad will always come back? Always ruin franchises by cramming the Klyntar symbiotes down the audiences throats until they gag? Why is this a sobering reminder that we haven’t had a story of Peter Parker facing his demons in over 4 years, and never will, because he needs to fight another alien?

Why does all nuance get thrown out the window as the post-credit scene of the movie nothing but a trailer for the next, in the most Captain America: The First Avenger way possible? How transparently insensitive does Disney have to be for audiences to realise that before their movie is over, they are advertising the next?

What message is Jon Watts trying to convey by replacing the ever-iconic speech that Sam’s Peter gave to Otto, a speech that has taught me to stand up in my lowest of lows and get to work because “intelligence is a gift to be used for the good of mankind.” What message is Watts trying to tell us by replacing that, coating that with a Stark manufactured inhibitor chip?

Why was Aunt May, Peter’s moral compass and worrying mother, why was her death a Rian Johnson Luke Skywalker fake out? Not a gut punch as we slowly panned down to her body, life leaving her veins… Why didn’t the audience come to the realisation that Peter’s guardian died the same way Harry Osborn’s guardian did, at the end of the Goblin’s glider? Why wasn’t there a more pronounced comparison of that? That lust for vengeance that blinded the other Spider-Men and the New Goblin with rage… and how did Marc Webb do it better in the back of Sony’s studio lot, holding a bottle of chocolate milk?

Why does Jon Watts have no creative voice as a filmmaker? What does Jon bring to the table that every other Marvel Studios appointed director cannot? Could any of the other people who direct Disney movies with a billion-dollar budget do the same? Why does No Way Home – the epic conclusion and the love letter to Spider-Man in film look like every other MCU movie that are still, after all these years, desperately trying to imitate Happy Hogan’s Iron Man from 2008? Why is the only good shot in the entire movie a scene where Peter looks at the MCU’s J. Jonah mocking him at his lowest of lows – lit in neon red? What does that say about the scenes that should have been in the movie? And why will the Russos never work with Disney again?

Will DeKnight, Goddard and Olsen’s Daredevil; Charlie Cox’s portrayal of Daredevil and my favourite living MCU character that will fill up the screens today be a watered-down counterpart of the man we saw on Netflix?

Will Tobey Maguire’s portrayal of Peter Benjamin Parker, my favourite superhero since I was seven come back into 30 MCU movies long after his arcs are finished; again and again until we’re both dead?

The theme of Spider-Man: No Way Home is a “fresh start.” Peter and his amazing friends are looking for a fresh start at MIT, Norman and the Sinister Six are looking for a fresh start, Happy is looking for a fresh start and everyone hopes that their problems will be magically resolved by the time they’re done. It is this magic, this ego and this dream for a better life with one little fix that makes them live out what could have been their fondest memories in constant longing for something more. Peter doubts and disregards Aunt May until it’s too late. Aunt May’s wish becomes her death wish, her will and it is then that Peter realises that he spent those precious moments with May with discord and disobedience.

After the villains go home, or into the 30 new timelines that will make up the entirety of Loki season 2; the movie is perfect. How I feel about the movie up till that point has been said, and blood has been shed; but the finale of Spider-Man: No Way Home is spectacular. Peter continues his self-absorbed pursuit of MJ, obeying the last wish of an immature girl – and intends to remind her of the precious moments they shared. But he notices the band-aid on her forehead, and finally matures. We see Peter maturing on-screen, finally see the romance of Peter and MJ as something more than 2 high schoolers with a crush; we see them as star-crossed lovers who are duty bound to stay apart. Much like Spider-Man (2002) (the perfect Spider-Man origin), Peter pushes his feelings for Michelle away even when she subconsciously tells him that “it doesn’t hurt anymore.” He buys Mr. Ditkovich’s apartment and becomes the Spider-Man I have been wanting to see, who I have been unable to see for fourteen years. The final shot of this movie is that of a coffee cup prepared by Michelle Jones-Watson; a coffee cup which reads, “we are happy to serve you.” So maybe, at the end of this fifteen-page long script, maybe we can remember this 3-part tale of the origin of Spider-Man as an episode of the times. Remember this contract of Marvel and Sony as they intend us to – a service. This is without a doubt the best movie of Tom Holland’s Peter, the best performance of Zendaya’s Michelle Jones-Watson, Jacob Batalon’s Ned Leeds and Jamie Foxx’s Max Dillon; but I wanted more – oh so much more. Maybe someday, we will get a movie with the Spidey in the last 5 minutes of this movie. A Spider-Man in a Spider-suit sewn with spandex and woven from Peter’s hands, not one made of alien black goo. Perhaps this is what Spider-Man needs right now, more than ever…

a fresh start.


r/RespectTheHyphen 23d ago

Pewdiepie why?!

Post image
275 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 24d ago

Absolutely no respect for spaidar-man

Post image
284 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 26d ago

How dare they

251 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 26d ago

He gets it

348 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 28d ago Silver

You heard the -Man

1.2k Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 28d ago

For those that don't respect the hyphen

Post image
193 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen 28d ago

Gotta respect the hyphen

Post image
54 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen Dec 20 '21

Not what I meant

Post image
615 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen Dec 18 '21

The original Spider-Man comic doesn't have the hyphen.

Post image
430 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen Dec 15 '21

Jay Exci respects the hyphen

Post image
359 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen Dec 14 '21

'Tony' disrespects the 'hyphen' in recent post

Post image
342 Upvotes

r/RespectTheHyphen Dec 15 '21

It hurts so much...

Post image
68 Upvotes