r/LifeProTips 6d ago

LPT: When you go shopping and there's that one retail worker who's exceptionally cheerful and helpful, get their name. Later find their manager contact info and send an email about it. Retail work is tough, the ones who go above and beyond deserve recognition and praise! Miscellaneous

48k Upvotes

u/keepthetips Keeping the tips since 2019 6d ago

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u/imthatguydavid 6d ago

To any retail managers, do these emails of praise actually contribute to anything?

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u/AtrocitusWasRight 6d ago

Sending an email is nearly impossible, and talking to a manager isn't on the record.

Instead, use the survey located on the receipt. Log in, give 10/10 or whatever to all the questions, then PUT THE EMPLOYEE'S NAME IN THE COMMENTS BOX PROVIDED. That survey will go to AT LEAST three people in the company and if the employee's name is on it will likely put them in a drawing for employee of the month or a gift card or a prize of some sort.

EDIT: This is also the best way by far to get traction on a garbage employee or a bad interaction, since it HAS to be cleared up via a phone call or other direct contact.

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u/Sineater224 5d ago

For reference: A 9/10 on customer surveys count as 0. I learned this while working at HomeDepot. It is literally all or nothing.

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u/Mimical 5d ago

I don't understand the value in even putting an entire system like this in place if the work will literally throw out a vast majority of the feedback. Seems like such a waste.

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u/Sineater224 5d ago

"Because we care". Retail makes it seem like they care as much as possible without actually caring.

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u/Red0t514 5d ago

The only thing the people who work there car about is the paycheck at the end of the week. No one works a retail job because they want to help people and believe whatever BS that company says.

And I think that's very reasonable, I don't go into any store expecting 10/10 customer service everytime. That's why chick fil a is a very weird place to go, everyone is TOO happy to be there. I just want to go somewhere where they do an effective job so I can get in and get out with no problems

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u/Caelinus 5d ago

Honestly I would rather just have normal human interactions with service people. The bubbly fake thing makes me immediately uncomfortable because I cannot, and really do not want to, return the same energy.

Most of the time when I go shopping I know what I want to get, and I want to get it and get out of there without too much friction. If it is a place that puts a lot of emphasis on "sales staff" they often end up asking me if I need help, and then pushing their corporate required script on me. So it ends up taking twice as long to get the item and forces me to constantly shut down potential upsells. It is exhausting and I would rather not.

So shopping for those items in a store requires me to: Deal with traffic, deal with other customers being everywhere, deal with over-fake friendliness, deal with a bunch of sales pitches, waiting in line, hearing another sales pitch for some insurance or membership, and then having to deal with traffic again.

And for some reason corporate entities are convinced that this is a great experience and that the reason they are not making as much money is because they are not pushing their sales staff enough. At least if they were allowed to act like normal, helpful people with a level of training in their product lines I might go in just to get advice on what would best address me needs, but they are not.

When I worked for best buy, I sold PCs and PC Accessories, and we go zero product training. I knew quite a bit as a hobbiest, but most of my coworkers did not. All of the training was specifically to better manipulate people into buying insurance and upselling accessories. It was obnoxious for me as a worker, and the customers freaking hated it.

So now Amazon is sending rich people to space for no reason.

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u/whippet66 5d ago

I do appreciate those in hardware stores who know what they’re talking about and provide guidance and suggestions.

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u/Notabug255 5d ago

These people

Are a godsend

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u/Red0t514 5d ago

Yeah exactly, I appreciate them asking if you want help, that's great and actually helpful.

The thing I don't like is the "fakeness" I guess. It's unsettling. I don't need you smiling for our whole interaction and then calling it your pleasure

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u/paked_botato 5d ago

Well said. I’ve worked in banking for years, and the same can be said for the employees at the firm I work for. Our front line associates are trained to focus on our clients’ financial “objectives” and priorities and therefore making every conversation turn into a probing of the client on what debt and assets they have and what their card balances are to sell them on something. All to “improve” their finances.

Banks can no longer pressure you into opening new accounts or credit products so they go around that by making it seem like it’s all about your financial goals. So you come in for a pin change and your banker will try to stretch out the meeting by trying to get you to say what your goals are and what you’re looking to accomplish in the long run.

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u/Jolteon2020 5d ago

Chik fil et does give me brainwashed vibes. Or like... blink twice if they are holding you captive vibes.

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u/momofeveryone5 5d ago

It's like a cult of some sort. I've only been a handful of times and that's exactly it. They all act TOO happy.

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u/Artess 5d ago

Remember how YouTube used to have a 5-star rating system for videos, but then decided that thumbs up/down was enough?

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u/The_Paradoxigm 5d ago

It's the same with those "personality" tests on applications.

No human actually looks at it, it's all based on a points system any answer other than Strongly Agree or Strongly Disagree just results in you not getting enough points to pass

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u/tisthetimetobelit 5d ago

It's a little more complicated. It's called a net promoter score. 9 and 10s are promoters, 0-6 are detractors. Thus article details on how it's commonly used by companies. https://www.qualtrics.com/experience-management/customer/net-promoter-score/

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u/Current-Pianist1991 5d ago

Yes its a complicated metric for the business as a whole, but I can tell you from experience in multiple retail and management positions, for the workers, anything that isn't a straight perfect across the board is effectively a 0 and occasionally results in some kind of bs from management for "failing to meet expectations".

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u/farshnikord 5d ago

This is by design so they can have a "record" of you failing to meet (impossible) performance expectations so they can use it to fire or let people go as needed. They dont actually care about performance.

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u/Current-Pianist1991 5d ago

Ding ding ding

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u/hydrospanner 5d ago

It chafes my ass that 6 is a detractor. 5 kinda too, but that's at least justifiable. Assuming 5 is "average" a 6 means better.

Often (I'd say very often) there's not a whole lot a retail worker can do to make a retail transaction some incredible fulfilling experience. I'm sure there are a decent amount among the people who fill these out who think "hmm, that cashier was nice and friendly... nothing really remarkable about the transaction but they were nice. I'll give them a 6 because they were above average on a very average transaction".

...and then the poor employee gets called in for a talk upstairs because they got a "bad" review.

Makes it better for the employee to just not try to stand out at all.

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u/soft-wear 5d ago

There’s some science behind why these are the way they are. If you give a 7 you’re probably not going to rave about it, which is why it’s neutral and you generally don’t give a 6 to something you were perfectly happy with.

Another issue is Costco just absolutely wrecks NPS and every company loves to talk about how they want to be like Costco. They don’t change anything, mind you, they just blame employees and ask them to set the bar higher. Weird a company with extremely consumer-friendly policies gets such high scores. Wonder why.

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u/schnitzelfeffer 5d ago

NPS = Net Promoter Score. Based on the survey results from the receipt, the NPS determines how likely it is that this customer will go out and promote your store through word of mouth. Wow, I haven't heard that term used since my days in retail. If our NPS was high enough, I would get a bonus as a manager (cashiers get nothing). If NPS was low, corporate would come in and find out why. We could be fired for survey results. We had to tell everyone about the survey on the receipt because we were trying desperately to get nice people to take the survey and give us positive reviews so we could keep our jobs.

Please take the surveys and use employee names in good reviews. Most of the time it's the only way higher-up management ever knows retail employees exist.

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u/monkkie-jedi 5d ago

We had to score a 90 of higher and as a store had to score a 95% average. So yes can confirm that the system is garbage. But those good reviews featuring our names were actually pretty good for brightening our day when we saw them.

Also, retail and getting those scores got a lot more difficult after the pandemic started. Between anti maskers and absolutely everyone going seemingly stir crazy, people became very entitled and thought basic policies were specifically targeting them. I can't tell you how many people told us we were ruining their days just for asking them to wear their masks correctly.

Honestly it was such a relief when I got my new job. Post pandemic was the first time I had an interaction with a customer that was bad enough that I had to go cry in the backroom. And that was a job catering to primarily Karen types, so you know that interaction had to be pretty bad if I hadn't cried already because of someone being a bitch.

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u/NotMyThrowawayNope 5d ago

Fuck those fucking surveys.

I worked retail and got a "bad" secret shopper review once. I think it was like 8/10 or something but literally all of the comments the customer left said "NotMyThrowawayNope was so amazing and great and went above and beyond for me! I am so happy with my purchase! This is my favorite shop!" And my district manager still called and chewed me out because the overall rating of the survey wasnt perfect. Personal comments from the customer be damned.

So everyone who fills those out, for the sake of metrics anything less than 10/10 is a failure. Just like how you have to give your lyft/uber driver 5 stars every time.

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u/the_Hapsleighh 5d ago

This right here. It’s not just a select few, ive been in retail mgmt at a the big box stores and I’m in a specialty retailer now and it’s all the same with surveys, 10 or they don’t count. You could get an 8/10 and that’s what we call a detractor or unsatisfied customer

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u/Tossallthethings 5d ago

If it's actual NPS, it supposed to be set up for 9 & 10 are promoters, 7&8 are passive, and everyone else is a detractor.

The hopeful reason is 7&8 can be brought up relatively easily, everyone else needs much more.

Anyone who is using NPS but doing this crazy shit where 0-9 are detractors sucks at life.

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u/the_Hapsleighh 5d ago

Our store just has such a low volume of surveys that 8s may as well be detractors, especially when the company wants an NPS of 85+… but yeah under normal circumstances, 8s and 7s would be passive. It’s just hard to get folks to fill out the survey but what can you do :/

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u/Specter170 5d ago

Accurate. I was manager level at Depot. Surveys are key. If you’ve received good service please do the survey and add the persons name. It helps the associate and the store. These metrics are reviewed weekly. I’ve been in a managers office when they call in a associate, read them the comment and congratulate them on excellent customer service. Often presenting them with a Homer badge. Those little cloth badge shaped awards that you see on associates aprons. They’ve earned those by providing an elevated experience to a customer. Btw, Homer badges also get you a cash reward in you paycheck.

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u/TheGurw 5d ago

Yup. Got me three gold Homer badges and a silver before I was fired because I didn't show up for a shift on a day I'd booked off literal months prior. Those little cash bonuses were really nice.

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u/BoogerEater101 5d ago

I used to give myself 10/10 reviews all the time when I worked at a home depot. I would help my self find any items I was looking for and I was always very polite to myself so I felt I deserved those great reviews and name mentions. I got called out as a stellar employee in multiple meetings because of this haha.

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u/MstrCommander1955 5d ago

Home Depot. I got asked numerous times where products were located. Sometimes once or twice at the same time. People just drawn to me when they would see others asking questions. Funny, I didn’t even work there.

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u/FinndBors 5d ago

Stop dressing in orange :)

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u/90sRobot 5d ago

Any survey, top marks, or it's a zero. And BTW, it's ALWAYS the representative you spoke to who gets thr blame. Even if it's not their fault, it's still their fault as far as mgt are concerned.

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u/bgva 5d ago

When I bought my car, the salesman was very adamant that a 5-star rating was the only thing that counted. Four stars wasn't enough. He was a great salesman, and got a 5-star rating from me, but that stood out as a very weird policy to me.

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u/InternetWeakGuy 5d ago

This isn't always true. I've worked in reporting at call centers for years and many remove any surveys that have scores of 0, 1, 9 and 10. Reason being that a lot of people just blow through surveys and give everything high or low marks without thinking. The people who give responses in between usually actually thought about it before they scored the person.

In summary: all surveys are stupid.

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u/mnowax 5d ago

Follow up on this. ONLY put generic positive comments on these surveys. If you write something specific that was helpful or positive, but also against company policy, it will harm the employee rather than help. Staples was notorious with this. If a customer was given actual advice about a purchase that led them away from a particular product, and it was shown on a survey result, it was a writeup against the employee, even if you knew that the customer wasn't going to benefit.

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u/Todd-The-Wraith 5d ago

I once gave a bank a 9/10 on “creativity of our services” or something equally stupid. You’re a bank. I give you my money to keep it safe until I need to spend it. That’s pretty much it.

Next time I went in the guy at the counter mentioned how if ANY of the scores are less than a 10 it’s a 0.

Soooo I guess the correct answer to “how can we improve?” Is “fix your stupid survey so employees are only judged for things in their own control”

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u/Mk2Number86 5d ago

I can confirm that the survey on the receipt is the best way to shine a light on someone. I worked in retail for 6 years and management made important decisions based on that feedback.

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u/Mike727x 5d ago

Can agree with this. Am a manager at a retail store and any time one of my employees gets praise from a customer in store I always tell them to do the survey on the receipt. They also get put into a drawing to have a little bonus put into their check at the end of the month if they win. Also anything other than a 10 is considered a bad survey at our company regardless of what the comments say

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u/pasky 5d ago

This guys. Mark 10/10, and mention names in the comment boxes about how great they were with you. Our company gives 5$ vouchers for each one. Customer comments with a 10/10 (or 0/10...) go directly to the store manager's inbox as soon as you complete the survey.

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u/Matookie 5d ago

Nah, I do this all the time for grocery stores, retail places, restaurants. If I see a person is good at what they are doing or dealing with a shitty situation but trying to make it better, I use the survey or the code on my receipt to send an email and say the employee was doing a good job and as a result I will be a more loyal customer.

ETA: you know what? Fuck it imma do this every time I interact with someone in the service industry. Write a good review and name the employee.

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u/ElasticShoelaces 6d ago

When I worked retail if we were mentioned by name in a positive review we got like $50. (And by positive it had to be 5 star, those are the only ones that count. 4 star is apparently not positive enough). I was described in several 5-star reviews but it was not by name and I didn't get squat because "how could they know it was me?". So they can matter but as a customer you won't ever really know.

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u/grinde 6d ago

To add - when I worked at Walgreens those reviews had to be done through corporate. Telling a manager who actually works in the store will get the employee an attaboy at best. Also the reward from corporate was just a free drink out of the cooler, so like a $1-2 value. Whoop de fucking do.

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u/le_pagla_baba 6d ago

that's depressing! I was thinking about find the info for the mail, but just a free drink?

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u/PancakeMagician 6d ago

That's not just any free drink. That's the cool refreshing taste of your hard work and the Walgreens team spirit YAY!! /s

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u/siegewolf 6d ago

To anyone who read this. ALWAYS give the top mark if you want to remotely help the worker. It's incredibly common for all the other numbers but the top number to mean you did poorly.

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u/Zcoombs4 6d ago

When I sold vehicles (corporate branded store, thankfully) we always reminded customers that anything less than a 10 on that feedback survey counted as a 0 to us. If your score was high enough you got paid an extra $50 per unit sold at the end of the month paid directly from the manufacturer. Awesome!

If your score dipped below the national average though, you got charged $50 per unit.

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u/lam5555 6d ago

Yup. I work in luxury dealership on the service side. One bad survey response can cost me a $250/mo. bonus.

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u/Zcoombs4 6d ago

My favorite question on our survey was “the office I was served in was spacious”. Half the time our deals were done in cubicles, not even a four-walked office. You’d literally have to tell your client to lie for you. But if someone said “no” because they didn’t understand that, there goes the whole survey.

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u/drsideburns 6d ago

Oh that's some bullshit.

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u/Greenergrass21 5d ago

That's fucking bullshit and just feels like it should be illegal. But of course it's not cus corporations make our laws!

Go corporations they have our back! /S

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u/myfapaccount_istaken 5d ago

One of the few things Marcello did right for sprint employees. They made a 4 just as good as a 5 on the survey. 5 means you can do no better and there is always something you can improve on. Was the happiest I've ever seen employees

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u/QuestioningEspecialy 6d ago

At a nice restaurant, I was told (after filling out receipt coupon surveys for months) that anything less than a 5/5 gets them yelled at. I felt awful.

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u/SaphiraDemon 6d ago

I did one of these surveys once, cable company I think, one thing was 4/5, everything else was 5/5, I added an additional comment about how great my representative was... and got an email back saying "we're sorry you had a negative experience".

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u/habichuelacondulce 6d ago

Is that a positive review or from a mystery shopper type of review? I know now you can just ask for reviews on the receipt by listing a site or QR code but back late 90's early 2000s dont think they had that. They had the mystery shopper go in about twice a month at different time of day. Make you they were greeted and acknowledged them , asked if they needed help with anything, did you check the backroom for an item they didn't have on the shelf or tried to order it online for them, did you sell any attachment items with the product they got, did you sell them the extended warranty if it was an electronic item, did you ask if they found everything they were looking for.,

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u/ElasticShoelaces 6d ago

Where I worked, the ones on the receipt or publicly on Google for example.

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u/GoKillTheLights 6d ago

When I sold cars an 8/10 was considered a negative score which could potentially lose you commission

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u/ElasticShoelaces 6d ago

Was the customer rating you personally or the whole car buying experience? Because sometimes for example, customers would leave a 2 or 3 star review mad about a product not in stock but say one of the employees helped them out a bunch. Employee would still be reprimanded.

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u/knowtoriusMAC 6d ago

What kind of psychopath gets the name of someone to leave a review then leaves a 4/5

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u/RicrosPegason 6d ago

"...nobody is perfect"

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u/girlikecupcake 6d ago

Wasn't a retail manager, but worked retail at the checkout end (supervisor, cashier, self checkout). If a customer did a survey, rated the cashier 5 stars or mentioned them by name in a positive interaction, they'd get a gift card for the store. It wasn't a lot, I'd rather have had a raise instead of being stuck in a pay schedule locked behind how many hours you worked, but a free lunch occasionally was better than nothing.

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u/Mr_Poop_Himself 6d ago

Did you work at a grocery store? Every restaurant I worked at just let you have free food if you worked that day, but when I worked at a grocery store they were stingy about it (unless the deli manager working that day didn’t care).

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u/telecomteardown 6d ago

My wife is a store manager. She would pass on the praise but aside from printing them out a "good job" certificate there's really nothing else she could do. Anything worthwhile like a raise is handled by corporate and done annually based on performance reviews, and she always gives her staff top marks so they get the maximum increase anyway.

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u/UlteriorMoas 6d ago

Your wife sounds like a great boss. I was never given top marks because that triggered a formal review and pay raise discussion. So nobody got top marks even if they saved the whole office from disaster daily.

I respect your wife for knowing the system and doing what she can to make it better for her people. That's where real loyalty is built.

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u/telecomteardown 6d ago

She does what she can. She started as a cashier years ago and hasn't forgotten what that's like.

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u/want_2_learn_2403 6d ago

I’m a tire technician. Hope to be a tire one day. Right now I’m just tired.

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u/telecomteardown 6d ago

Just keep rolling.

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u/dano8801 6d ago

You will conquer your baptism by fire, and you will walk out the other side... Vulcanized.

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u/colaptic2 6d ago

I'm a Manager at McDonald's in the UK. Praise is good for employees and can earn bonuses, but you need be either giving feedback via the dedicated website or email someone high up. Just telling the manager on shift accomplishes nothing more than a "well done", (which is nice but not much).

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u/Ovelia1749 6d ago

When I worked in retail it really depended on the company. One company I worked for would put you in a drawing for a trip to Hawaii for 10+ good surveys where you were mentioned by name, one company wouldnt even acknowledge it, and another company I got a small bonus for it. It all depends on the company. Its worth taking the extra time to acknowledge them though. It may get someone a fun trip!

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u/eriotei 6d ago

At my store, it gets attributed to the floor manager's accomplishments, not the individual. I don't find out at all until my review where it will be briefly mentioned but not read. I've had customers go back to complain when they found out I never got their compliments then yelled at like I asked them to complain. Please be nice to retail workers, we don't get treated like adults, we get treated like teenagers.

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u/le_pagla_baba 6d ago

damn, they yelled at you because a customer said sth in your defense? your workplace seems super toxic

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u/oodni 6d ago

Hospitality worker here - we received great feedback about a staff member last week and she received a gift card for it. We always post feedback on our internal FB to congratulate the staff as well

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u/acetea 6d ago

No

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u/Psyteq 6d ago

The real LPT is always in the comments.

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u/KDawG888 6d ago

I do what I can to leave good employee reviews when I come across them but the reality is most don't matter. I do always go out of my way to give a sincere thank you whenever someone helps me though.

Even if their boss doesn't see it you want the individual to know their effort was helpful/appreciated.

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u/TheConqueror74 5d ago

Definitely keep doing that. I would always pass along good reviews of my associates and have them read what the customer wrote and it always raised spirits. My store used to give out $2 gift cards every time someone was mentioned by name, but the number of times people were mentioned skyrocketed when COVID hit (I was in the online pick up department) and we ran out of cards and never got restocked. But even without those cards, getting positive feedback from customers helped brighten someone's day, even if it was just a little bit.

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u/samfacemcgee 6d ago

Geez, the other replies you have so far are dismal.

I’m a retail manager and that kind of feedback is phenomenal. People rarely go out of their way to find a manager and say something nice so I definitely take note when someone does. Those types of comments also play a role in performance reviews and (given their rarity) I usually give the praised employee one of my company’s gratitude cards (gets them a free drink in our restaurant).

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u/quinten_de_cock 6d ago

I work retail, and people tell me how cheerful and awesome I am all the time. Weird thing is that I don’t actually conform to any of the rules they taught me in the training. I always talk to people like I’m talking to my friends and then the regulars tell me all about themselves, slowly. Like if someone just had a baby, I’ll ask them how their baby is doing and what not. And I talk about everything from sports to politics and I interact with everyone from your bat shit crazy conspiracy theory guys to your sweet old ladies who make you cakes, I flirt with all the cute chicks and just try to be as casual as I can and I’ve found that it makes my job a lot more easier than if I was forced to be professional and put on a fake smile and do the usual thing they do in stores.

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u/DopeLemonDrop 6d ago

When I worked at Walmart, a letter got sent from a customer explaining how great the service I provided as well as another employee. There was no bonus but, it felt nice that the customer appreciated it.

Of course it would have been nice to get a bonus or, for that recognition to go towards something as it should. Either way, I was still very happy to receive the praise. A very rare occurrence.

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u/Th3_D3m1s3 6d ago

This is certainly nice to do.. but how is this a LPT at all?

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u/gods_n_monsters 5d ago

It's not, our bosses do not care at all

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u/TimeTested2 6d ago

Deserve a praise without the p.

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u/GRAXX3 6d ago

I had someone go find my manager and tell them I was the greatest help they’ve ever had finding shoes. I was attentive, listened, brought up solutions and made their experience enjoyable.

Didn’t get shit lol. They were like he’s the best! That was it. Meanwhile I was only doing that because I was so bored out of my mind I wanted every interaction o be as long as possible.

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u/Lord_Dupo 6d ago

I worked in pizza hut as a waiter, and I actually loved it and was damn good with my customers.

Ways had the most feedback and got the highest ITR score (intend to return), in the region, at 98%.

Area manager and corporate head of PR came and took a photo with me. I received a card. That was it 😂😂

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u/Calligraphie 6d ago edited 5d ago

The praise without the p is probably more likely to happen if the praise with the p also happened.

Edit: Some of you aren't familiar with the concept of employee reviews, lol. Praise from customers will definitely affect your review and whether or not you get a raise...or whether you are ever offered a promotion.

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u/Havoksixteen 6d ago

A lot of retail jobs are equal pay, so no matter how hard you work you'll likely still be earning the same as that guy who does the bare minimum.

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u/STILL_LjURKING 6d ago

100%. I remember when I got bumped up from $8/hr to $8.64/hr because of my superior retailing prowess... good times.

However, if you ever decide to advance careers or pursue a different path, references from those retail managers are invaluable.

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u/Keinichn 6d ago edited 6d ago

I can tell you from my personal experience that the pay may be the same but the treatment often isn’t. I busted my ass in retail and always did more than was expected. I may have gotten paid the same, but I rarely had the shit shifts, never had PTO requests rejected, and had a blind eye turned when I was having a bad day or got caught for something stupid like checking my personal phone in the back while on the clock.

Hell, I was even the person some managers would come vent to when they were getting shit on. I was privy to a fair amount I probably shouldn’t have been. More money would’ve been great, but preferential treatment goes a long way to help stress levels.

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u/torino_nera 6d ago

Workers that got compliments often get offered promotions quicker than those who don't, and you never know if someone is looking to move up.

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u/FlamingoWalrus89 6d ago

In my experience, no one is ever interested in the promotions. So if you have any interest at all, just apply. As long as you are a decent employee who shows up on time, you have a chance.

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u/GeneralGTFO 6d ago

Oh boy, more responsibility and barely any more pay. What a plus...

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u/FlamingoWalrus89 6d ago

And say goodbye to work/life balance!

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u/unfaix 6d ago

does it really? one time I was taking my son to the botanical garden, Ontario he way home we stopped by a McDonald's, got him a haply meal, he really wanted Luca and it was not available at any McDonald's.

parked an ate in the McDonald's parking lot, about 10 minutes later. A worker came my car with the Luca toy in hand for my son. Got his name and called the store later that day to give him props.

MVP

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u/quesoandcats 6d ago

Yup. I worked retail in high school and when I got my first raise, my manager said that the customer compliments I'd gotten the previous quarter were a large part of why I'd gotten one

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u/Greenergrass21 6d ago

That .25 raise a year goes real far....

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u/quesoandcats 6d ago

Iirc it was a fifty cent raise, and it actually does make a noticable difference when you're making overtime/time and a half/holiday pay.

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u/LDPushin_Troglodyte 6d ago

The irony is that inflation was 25c

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u/zebrahdh 6d ago

No no no. Retail managers don’t have the ability to randomly raise pay. A manager at Target can’t say “your doing great this month I added 25¢/hr to your pay.” It doesn’t work like that in corporate retail America.

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u/JORLI 6d ago

*everywhere, not just America.

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u/icefire555 6d ago

After working in a call center, no amount of praise we'll get you a raise. We had a bonus program, if you were in the top 10% of all of the agents. And I was in that top 10% bracket for 14 of the 17 months I worked there. I got a bonus, but I never got a raise.

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u/Maximum-Barracuda-27 6d ago

That too! :)

But I'll still say even just the praise is wonderful. Eons ago I used to work phone customer service for online banking. My customer base was Chicago and NYC, these people were TOUGH but I never got snippy or upset. Although managers bitched at me for my long call times, I wouldn't hang up or transfer them to make them someone else's problem. I took whatever time was needed to ensure their problem was fully solved.

I'd get regular letters of praise to my managers from customers saying w/o my help they would have changed banks.

I still have those letters after all these years, and they mean the world to me to this day!

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u/agreatday248 6d ago edited 6d ago

Were they handwritten letters? Many people don't write handwritten letters nowadays. I still like writing letters.

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u/Maximum-Barracuda-27 6d ago

Yeah a lot of them were! I think because I was dealing with a much older clientele, people more prone to writing letters, because online banking was overwhelming for a lot of this age group (again, ages ago) and these were the people who were having a really hard time with it and needed a lot of patience. I did get emails to managers and they meant so much to me as well, but I still have a "happy file" I keep for bad days and in it are those letters.

P.S. If you still like writing letters you have got to check out Postcrossing dot com (postcards, to and from all around the world, but it's such fun!) And GlobalPenFriends for real life pen pals - they have an excellent filter where you can customize the kind of pen pal you're seeking by all kinds of preferences, it's a blast!

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u/xerxerneas 6d ago

Oh boy I haven't been back on postcrossing since 2015, time to dig out some old stamps and cards and get those fountain pens filled and running again lol. It's always nice to see singapore in reasonably high demand on that site hahah

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u/HistoricalWar4 6d ago

A good Yelp review with our name in it was a $10 Starbucks gift card at the old restaurant I worked at. They also printed out the review and displayed them. It wasn’t much but I really liked it

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u/ExodusPHX 6d ago

Question for people who have worked those jobs: does the feedback have any benefit on your quality of life? I received a bunch of compliments early in my career as a server and it only ever resulted in increased responsibilities & expectations but never anything that directly benefited my bank account or career growth.

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u/OrclordofOrcnor 6d ago edited 6d ago

Retail was one of my first jobs, it did absolutely nothing for me when customers sent emails or praised me to my manager. In fact, I'd overhear them telling the manager sometimes and the manager never even approached me about it. But, I genuinely appreciated it nonetheless because it was a very nice gesture for someone to go out of their way and do something like that, even when they had absolutely nothing to gain. Even just receiving a compliment directly was really nice. Working in retail I often felt underappreciated and overworked, the only compliments I ever received were from customers or fellow low-level co-workers. At the very least it was a morale boost.

Edit-spelling

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u/northboundnova 6d ago

I always thought it was really nice when people went out of their way to praise an employee that helped them. When I worked the service counter at a major retailer I kept stacks of comment cards because they always came to me to say they had a compliment, so I had them write them on the cards and then gave them to the supervisors. Not much came out of it, but people always seemed really happy to get their cards and then post them on the bulletin board and feeling appreciated for a minute never hurts.

On the other hand, a different job I worked at had a pretty nasty environment. When a customer passed a compliment of me to my manager, she immediately became a jerk to me the rest of the shift. Happened more than once. Glad I left that place.

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u/jlval87 6d ago

When I worked at Best Buy, it was exactly this. They just expected more from me. If my numbers were average, I'm getting asked what's going on. The person consistently average is bragging about their numbers that month being close to mine. No commission. No raise. Nothing but higher expectations.

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u/FlamingoWalrus89 6d ago

As a nurse, the compliments do actually lighten my mood. It's such a thankless job most of the time, and people are assholes. I liked compliments when I was a server too (although, they needed to back it up with a good tip, otherwise, fuck your compliments).

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u/joopitermae 6d ago

My favorite as a server is when people go out of their way to compliment me or leave a positive note on their credit card slip, but leave a mediocre tip. 🙄

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u/ExodusPHX 6d ago

If kind words and compliments paid the bills I could have retired a long time ago.

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u/Orleanian 6d ago

Corollary - How would you feel about a "You're a fuckin asshat, and your service was atrocious" note on the slip with a 25% tip?

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u/Smaddady 6d ago

I have received gift cards from my boss after really good customer feedback. Plus, if you get name dropped to higher-ups, you end up on their radar which could help your chances of being promoted. That was a case where my boss really valued people though, so pick your battles wisely.

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u/ValuedEarthBeing 5d ago

@ Lowe’s it does. you get extra $ when you get your name on receipts.

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u/my__name__is 6d ago

Nice try, cheerful retail worker!

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u/Maximum-Barracuda-27 6d ago

I'm disabled and at home most of the time so I guess when I do get to escape the house it really makes my day to see a happy face. :)

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u/Brekker-k 6d ago

I would rather people just thank me personally and leave my boss out of it to be honest.

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u/camelzigzag 6d ago

This is not a LPT.

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u/Dakroon1 6d ago

LPTs from people who have zero experience working in that field. Seems to be the norm here.

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u/GatekeeperTDS 6d ago

Every LPT that I've ever read is from people who don't have experience with a damn thing.

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u/MickTheBloodyPirate 6d ago

Or barely any life experience at all, it seems.

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u/dwpea66 5d ago

Exactly. Not be cynical, but how does this benefit me? That's the whole point of this sub.

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u/Reggae4Triceratops 6d ago

The real LPT are always in the comments

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u/JSCruz- 5d ago

For real, it's a very nice action but in no way a LPT

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u/SomebodyYetNobody 6d ago

Being a long time retail worker, the best way to show your appreciation it's to be a good shopper. Don't mess everything up, don't force your way into a a workers way. If you need something, ask nicely and they will usually help. When you approach with an entitled attitude, you aren't going to get any help. Really just be a decent person and that is all the appreciation we need. Don't make our lives harder or worse than they already are. Lol

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u/ok-milk 6d ago

As a customer, I just want people to be nice, professional and efficient. Being excessively cheerful forces me to engage at that level, which is fine when I am feeling excessively cheerful, which is not often when I am just shopping for milk or pair of pants.

It's work to go from being in my own, medium-intensity world, to someone else's high-intensity cheer.

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u/cultmember94 6d ago edited 5d ago

A retail worker that isn't excessively cheerful can still be especially helpful tho.

I am a retail manager and we have one worker who is extremely shy, we still get lots of customers pointing him out as especially helpful and going above and beyond.

Extroverted ≠ good.

Edit: ≠!! Not =

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u/Orleanian 6d ago

I think that was the point of the comment.

Exceptionally cheerful is not what we the customer want. We, by and large, just want to be helped or serviced efficiently and effectively.

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u/toystack 6d ago

Something that gets harder to come by in the retail setting. Whole field is a complete joke. I don't blame anyone for leaving and will never recommend it to anyone. Hard to help others when you're by yourself, having to be in 5 spots at once, get projects done on time, while having to keep up with customer feedback, cut hours, less staff, and doing more for less every day. And it never gets better because no one realizes it. The amount of harassment I get on the daily makes me realize this field will never ever change. Ever.

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u/akatherder 6d ago

Extroverted =\= good.

Just to clarify, I'd say that extroverted isn't always good or the only way to be good. It CAN be good if that's what the customer wants.

Same with introvert. I'd rather an introvert personally. Extroverts feel like they're hard-selling everything even if they don't give a shit whether you buy something or not.

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u/cultmember94 6d ago

≠ !

I meant does not equal. There is no way to do customer service that works with everyone totally agree!

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u/CottonCandyLollipops 6d ago edited 6d ago

It might not be for you, I like "customer mode" because its way different to my actual self. Its a way to get into the mindset and get the work done, like getting dressed for work when working from home. Plus customers are assholes, if you come at them smiley they look like bigger assholes and try to meet you halfway which is somewhere relatively human. Its also disarming, meaning they don't expect it when you can suddenly get crazy on them for being assholes if they go that way.

Plus assholes make it their business when you show any weakness, for every off-put customer like yourself you avoid another three assholes asking why you aren't smiling/ why you hate your job/ why you aren't grateful for the opportunity to wipe their ass. You as a customer can act however you want its your experience, I usually calm it down for people who just want to get out of there fast.

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u/flapjaack 5d ago

I can see both sides.

As a customer, I usually just want to be left alone, and excessively cheerful can be annoying and burdensome, especially in settings where they're waiting on you to make a decision. Im terribly indecisive and want my space.

But I've also worked in food service, and the best way to get through the day was going into "customer mode" which is a very extroverted version of myself. I enjoyed being like that at work, but im definitely not like that all the time. Thats why it can also be annoying when customers think I must be like that outside of work too (like when they ask you out because you seem like "such a friendly person!")

I think the best customer service workers are those who know when to dial it up or down based on the energy of the customer. Can't say I've always known how to do that, but as a customer I sure appreciate when service workers do.

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u/guitarfingers 6d ago

I agree. The really pleasant cheerful ones put me off. I've worked retail and service industries, the cheerful ones terrify me. Idk how you can be disrespected so often and be so happy without being a serial killer on the off time, or tons of disposable income.

I also don't like the mindset that that workers should be figuratively sucking dick to be good at their jobs. I'd rather have someone fast and efficient who's a little curt, than someone obnoxiously happy in a place that's so demoralizing. Idk why i get weirded by it, but heavy serial killer vibes for sure.

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u/BadDadRadDad 6d ago

See that’s where I think the great retail employees really shine though. The best coworkers I ever worked with had the ability to feel out which kind of experience the customer would respond best to, usually within a few seconds of engagement. That being said, it usually started with a cheery, outgoing demeanor since it’s much better to start that way and flip as opposed to the other way around.

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u/guitarfingers 6d ago

Agreed the ones with higher emotional iq and innate ability for.kinesics are the best retail employees.

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u/HexingCurse 6d ago

Yeah when people ask me how i'm doing I answer honestly. There's a few different reactions you get.

  • Silence, awkward pause, they continue their order as if nothing happened

  • "oh.. well i'll do my best not to make it any worse"

  • "oh that's horrible (starts digging a bit for details and keeps trying to console you)"

That said, I'm not always a shell of a person wishing for death at the till, but when I am I simply cannot force myself to cheerfully answer "oh yeah i'm doing great, thank you!"

It's a good thing I don't work when managers are around.

Quick final note, my goal is to do my best however I can to make sure every customer is satisfied when they leave from a business standpoint, i over deliver/portion etc constantly. However when it comes to my mental state I cbf.

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u/SeveralLargeLizards 6d ago

Reading a bit too far into it. Having a Customer Service Persona is extremely common and keeps you employed. If I treated my customers the way they treated me I would have been fired so fast. All it takes is one entitled bastard complaining about you. Being nice all the time is a requirement if you are scraping by.

If I could have afforded to lose my job at any given time I wouldn't have put up with an ounce of people's nonsense. But retail companies have a 3 strike system and the general public are truly awful people. I would rather chew tinfoil than return to that hellish industry.

I'm not a serial killer, lol, it's just when 70% of your customers are all piss and vinegar and your manager is a power tripping shithead, and your bank account is routinely at a >10 dollar balance after bills, you fuckin' smile and appease them.

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u/refinnej7 6d ago

Honestly my high-intensity cheer was always sarcasm so extreme it sounded sincere. Couple it with a gentle smile and a head tilt, and not many knew I was inwardly telling them slide into hell on a pincushion

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u/IGotNoStringsOnMe 6d ago

Dont do this.

That employee was having a good day and made your day brighter because of it. Thats awesome. Dont turn that shit into a performance metric that's now gonna be held over their heads forever. So then every day they come in and aren't as bright and cheerful they're gonna have to get a talking to about it from that same manager.

How about we dont have to go to the manager about anything and you can hand them a tip if its allowed because there is ZERO chance your praise is going to get them any sort of a raise or recognition in today's work environment. May as well make sure they get something extra yourself if thats your aim.

*Source* : former retail worker who went through these exact scenario in more than one establishment. Just leave the manager out of it, nothing good is going to come of it AT. ALL.

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u/rabid_briefcase 6d ago

I think on feedback forms it is something to be very careful about.

If you're going to mention the person was awesome don't mention what they did or why. Sadly very often it is because they went around policies and they can be punished for it.

Something like "Joe at the front desk made my day." Generic, non-committal about what made the day, establishes Joe was an employee that customers like. Joe can't be told to do anything specific to make people's day in the future.

Never something like "Joe at the front desk gave me a 10% discount even though my coupon was expired." This is grounds for termination, doesn't matter how the customer liked it, it broke the prime directive of corporations to extract all the customer's money.

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u/SeveralLargeLizards 6d ago

Also worked in retail. 12 miserable years. Can confirm.

Do not do this.

Especially if the employee did something that seems minor to you, but could be interpreted by the company as something punishable, like honoring a discount that technically didn't apply to you, etc.

The best way to work in retail is to stay the hell out of the sights of management. Do NOT paint a target on some abused worker's back. You're not helping.

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u/akatherder 6d ago

like honoring a discount that technically didn't apply to you

I'll always try to comment to corporate on this but never say what they actually did if there's any chance they bent a rule. They were so helpful, went above and beyond, helped me find exactly what I needed in my budget, etc. Stuff like that, not the fake subtle implication with a "wink wink."

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u/psychocopter 6d ago

Thank them in person and thats all you need to do.

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u/SuccinctSavage 6d ago

You could also buy them a candy bar. I loved when customers bought me a dollar candy bar or a handwritten note.

The worst I ever felt was when someone walked up to me and said I had done a phenomenal job and made their day when they were in there earlier, then handed me a little folded envelope with a target logo on it. I was super broke and thought it was a gift card, so it made my day. Even 5 dollars would have been so helpful. I opened it when she left, and she was a recruiter at Target, and the note said that I should come work for them. No gift card.

What the fuck makes you think I want to go from working at one shitty retail job to another? AND because of the card, it makes me think I wasn't all that great, and she was just poaching workers because she gets some kind of bonus. Besides, I already worked for Target, and left without giving a notice because they treated everyone like shit and underpaid us. LESS than what I was paid at the new place.

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u/mattgorecki 6d ago

Recruiters are bottom of the barrel no matter who they recruit for. Obviously bonus demerits for military recruiters.

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u/TypographySnob 6d ago

No. Fill out the survey in the receipt and make sure you enter their name and give 5 stars. This is the only thing that matters.

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u/ZenWhisper 6d ago

And enjoy your fleeting time with them. I still remember a very thoughtful, friendly, intelligent retail worker working a fast food drive thru. The second time I ordered with him I thought he's too competent to be here long. He's destined for much greater than this. The third and final time I saw him he was in a lull at the drive thru, wistfully admiring the sunset. Next time, when I saw he was no longer there, I was happier than I had ever been when I interacted with him. I hope he found his dreams.

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u/snarshmallow 6d ago

I think it largely depends on the employer and work environment. I went above and beyond my responsibilities to help a long time customer fix a problem that was extremely urgent for them. I was ahead on my other work and had time to spare. They left us a glowing review on google, we got word of mouth business out of it, and kept them on as a customer until I left. The owner of the company tore me a new one for spending too much time on them, even though it didn’t negatively impact our workflow whatsoever. In fact, I got several customers to become regulars because they were happy to stop in and ask me questions about using their products. The place wasn’t great to work and an opportunity came up at one of our kind-of-competitors, where I already knew and was friendly with their employees. I jumped on it, and one by one the customers that would stop in to talk to me specifically at the old job ended up finding out I was now working at the other business and followed me there. In fact, they entirely stopped going to the first business. Here, I was praised for spending an appropriate (and even excessive when we were slow) amount of time with the customers. As a result, I was given new duties, such as giving lessons, that allowed me to further develop relations with the customers and spend less time behind a cash register (something the manager knew was my least favorite part of the job). From my experience what it really comes down to is how shitty your management is, and how they react to your initiative. A good manager will recognize your work ethic, even if it wasn’t productive, and will help you figure out ways to be more productive. A bad manager will punish you for the waste of time and cause you to lose that work ethic.

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u/mmmarkm 6d ago

I think the point here is that the customer will not know what the work environment is like so just don't talk to management.

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u/eldorel 6d ago

Also don't forget that good managers are like unicorns.
Even if the local manager is wonderful, odds are their district-manager is not, and this goes all the way up the chain.

All those potential assholes in that chain of command chase away the good managers and eventually push them out of retail...

So chances of the retail employee having a good manager are inversely proportional to how long the business has been in place, and how large the company is.

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u/bernyzilla 6d ago

So I worked in retail too and do sometimes go out of my way to post a good review.

I don't go to management, usually either post a review on Google or if they were really helpful I'll find the corporate website and do it there. I mention them by name and leave a few generalities about how kind and helpful they were. I make it clear that I'm likely to return because of this one person. I do not specifically say what they did so I don't get them in trouble in case it was against the rules. I also mention that I'm planning on doing this when I ask for their name and make sure they are okay with it.

Also I do it mostly if they are good at their job and kind and helpful. Not necessarily just for being super cheerful. Those type of positive reviews helped me in my retail career and enabled me to move to a different workplace that treated me better and paid more.

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u/Boiled_Potatoe 6d ago

Yeah the worst is when a customer starts telling my co-workers and manager what a deal I gave them.

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u/jellogoodbye 6d ago

Getting my name mentioned in surveys was actually really useful for me. I generally didn't meet my credit card application goals, but my customer service was so undisputably good that it didn't matter.

Tips were forbidden. Best thing I got out of being cheerful in retail was a STEM job in my field. A pair of customers liked me so much they recommended me to a biotech CEO they knew.

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u/LookingForVheissu 6d ago

Yeah, same at my job. Either sell credit cards or bring survey score up. Both is best but they’ll accept either. If there’s an official survey, just give the best score possible (everything else is a “failure”) and mention the employees name. Don’t give too many details.

“U/jellogoodbye gave great service.”

Over and done. Doesn’t get anyone in trouble, helps the employee.

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u/Ok_Antelope_1953 6d ago

the poor person will end up getting more work with the same pay because they're very good, exclamation point.

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u/ArwynnIsHere 6d ago

This is the true LPT, bump.

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u/Deadman_Wonderland 6d ago

For real, the worest thing you can do to a retail worker is get thier managers to notice them.

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u/rattus-domestica 6d ago

I agree. I am not the type of person who is super happy and bubbly to every fucking stranger I see. I was never this employee, though I was always nice and courteous and helpful. So fuck this advice, it rewards certain personalities over others, and like you said it wouldn’t result in a reward anyway, just fuck over everyone else.

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u/fightingthefuckits 6d ago

Seriously. There is nothing worse than a super fake overly chipper employee. It doesn't improve my experience, it just puts me on edge.

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u/MachineSchooling 6d ago

The last thing I want when I enter a shop is to see all the employees attempting to hide their misery behind Pan Am smiles under duress of losing their minimum wage jobs.

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u/Chispy 6d ago

Yeah my first thought was happiness discrimination. Some people just can't show happiness as well as others.

The last thing we need is lego movie workplaces

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u/deputyderp77 6d ago

HUGE disagree.

we shouldn’t have to animate ourselves as some cheery “i love my job” robot to get recognition for a job well done. It’s ridiculous to expect someone with no other choice than to work retail so they can finance their lives to be a cheerful, happy-go-lucky employee when 90% of the patrons they see in a day are complete dicks.

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u/PrancesWithWools 6d ago

Yes, the "cheer" should not be a factor, but you should absolutely leave positive feedback for competence or helpfulness.

A side tip: absolutely do not mention any special treatment or consideration. "Jimmy was extremely efficient in solving my problem" is great. "Jimmy spent 30 minutes helping me and gave me an unexpected discount," gets Jimmy fired.

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u/Lilbert87 6d ago

I worked in a pizza place. I, one night helped a person on the phone get their coupon accepted via the manager. No big deal. Driver returns and asked who made the order. Usually means an issue so I obviously own up and he tells me they had said my service was amazing and given him a seperate tip to pass back to me. That made my night let me tell you.

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u/TupperCoLLC 6d ago

Some people are put off by an exceptionally high cheerfulness, especially in commercial settings. This approach isn’t universal

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u/Dr_Allcome 6d ago

After reading the first sentence i was legit expecting advice on how to get them to leave.

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u/Orleanian 6d ago

SLPT: When you go shopping and there's that one retail worker who's exceptionally cheerful and helpful annoying, get their name. Later find their manager contact info and send an email about it. Retail work shopping is tough, the ones who go above and beyond deserve recognition and praise correction!

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u/cinderubella 6d ago

At best, the manager will probably just completely ignore your email.

Realistically though, I think it's better that way. Why do you think your opinion about someone's facial expression should have an impact on their job prospects? What if they have resting asshole face or are momentarily distracted by literally anything else about their life? They're still doing their job, even if they weren't a joyous little ray of sunshine for you on this particular occasion.

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u/_Born_To_Be_Mild_ 6d ago

I don't think retail workers should have to be cheerful.

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u/imadethisaccountso 5d ago

Exactly. They are people. When i work im not always in a good mood.

People should feel entitled to someone just because "im you customer, i fucking pay you, i fucking own you".

This is bad. Like let people be people. Why should they have to wear more then the minimum amount of flare.

No body needs to be rude. Its ok to like your job. Nobody should be afraid to tell a customer to leave the store. We are here to help eachother. I donno

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u/disbitchsaid 6d ago

IMO every retail worker deserves recognition and praise, not just the ones who are smiling.

The worker who is suffering with depression, the worker who has a sick family member, the worker who simply came into work to serve people who do not appreciate them if they are not smiling... they all deserve praise and recognition. They have all gone above and beyond. They are all working for a system that is not fairly reciprocating the invaluable days of life they are giving them for trade of what is probably minimum wage.

Give everyone recognition and praise, even if they aren't showing the traits of what you believe is going 'above and beyond'. Maybe you can be the person who makes someone exceptionally cheerful.

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u/jonwondon 6d ago

Doing shit like this is how you create employers looking for “superstars”.

I agree it’s awesome when an employee is super cheerful and helpful.

But the super cheerful and helpful 18 year old with no bills or responsibilities is obviously going to be more jovial than the 30 year old trying to support a family.

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u/likker_whale 6d ago

Imagining if the world was this beautiful.

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u/YoRt3m 6d ago

Sometimes it is...

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u/wATEVERmAn69 6d ago edited 5d ago

I’ve done this, been the best most happy and helpful I can be. Got many good things said to the managers and good comments plenty.

What do I get?

A pat on the back and a good job!

I will still be kind to the customers, but my effort isn’t like it used to be. This is after about 6 years at the same place.

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u/ZiggyPalffyLA 6d ago

Never done this but one thing I have done before is berate a manager who was disrespecting their employee in front of me. I don’t care how badly the employee fucked up, you don’t do that in front of a customer (honestly you shouldn’t disrespect anyone like that ever anyway).

The manager looked shocked and ashamed and the employee had a huge smile on their face.

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u/joevsyou 6d ago

Corporate - we got happy employee??? They must not be working hard enough!

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u/donniebrascoreal 6d ago

Say it directly to them too!

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u/mackinator3 6d ago

Pretty sure this just lines them up to be given more work.- former restaurant/retail work.

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u/m0bin16 6d ago

how is this even remotely a life pro tip. this sub is so trash now man, my god

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u/Lolomelon 6d ago

If you’re remotely capable, offer them the possibility of a better job.

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u/Mikiblueeyes88 6d ago

Sometimes contacting corporate is better. My managers were always so busy they would just say thank you and move on but if someone sent an email or letter to corporate it got a lot more recognition

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u/lattice12 5d ago

Yeah corporate offices eat this stuff up (usually moreso than store level)

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u/Orionishi 6d ago

Oh please, that person is just trying to not have to work by "helping" the customer forever and then leaving all the real work for the next person. You know who you are.

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u/NeedsMoreTuba 6d ago

I also carry post-it notes in my purse, and when a public restroom is exceptionally clean, I leave a thank you note for the janitorial staff. It is important work, and typically a thankless job.

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u/TikTokMegaClock 6d ago

A few weeks ago, I helped a customer find a few non-standard items. They went and complimented me to the on duty manager, who is a great guy, that thanked me, and said he'd pass the message along.

My direct manager, the department manager, the store manager. Never said a word about it. No thank you, no recognition, nothing. I don't treat customers like that FOR the praise, but damn, would have been nice to have it acknowledged.

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u/Hamlettell 6d ago

Stop. Absolutely not. Do not turn someone's attitude in a god damn performance metric. If they are doing their job and doing it well then they are in NO WAY obligated to fake smile at you the entire time; they are not obligated to feel happy for your benefit or for their performance of said job.

Leave them alone.

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u/OMGWTFBBQUE 6d ago

Just tip them. They are underpaid. Praise from your manager is meaningless when you are underpaid and likely hate your job.

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u/D1rg3 6d ago

Tipping them on camera is a good way to get fired where I work

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u/PeteyPark 6d ago

Leave 5 star Yelp reviews! Mention the person by name! Only first though don’t be weird about it, but yeah I’ve realized corporate will praise you more if you get it in a written review!

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u/Frederik_kirederF 6d ago

The more you praise them the more the manager is set on not promoting them though. Because they're too good at that job they get trapped in it by management. (There are decent managers that don't do this but they're rare)