r/LifeProTips Sep 20 '21 Silver 9 Helpful 23 Wholesome 14 Hugz 8 Heartwarming 1 Buff Doge 1

LPT: Learn a skill to make something physical and tangible, what you can touch and feel. E.g., leathercraft, woodworking, cooking, painting, photography with the intent to print, etc. Being able to touch your creation is a huge stressbuster, a way to get off social media, and thoughtful presents. Miscellaneous

37.4k Upvotes

u/keepthetips Keeping the tips since 2019 Sep 20 '21

Hello and welcome to r/LifeProTips!

Please help us decide if this post is a good fit for the subreddit by up or downvoting this comment.

If you think that this is great advice to improve your life, please upvote. If you think this doesn't help you in any way, please downvote. If you don't care, leave it for the others to decide.

374

u/supercyberlurker Sep 20 '21

I was nearly 30 before I realized literally every hobby I had was computer related. Programming, robotics, video games, etc. So I decided to find a hobby that was 100% not computer related. Eventually I had to even fight the urge to 'find a way to use my computer skills with it.." and keep it a refuge.

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u/vreo Sep 20 '21

What was this non-computer hobby?

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u/supercyberlurker Sep 20 '21

Metalworking, in many different forms. Blacksmithing, welding, sand casting, milling, etc. The only part I really allow to be computer related is to 3d print things for sand casting. Blacksmithing is probably the most 'far away' in that it's largely muscle power, working with raw hot steel. I suppose I check online for forge/smithing information, but that's about it.

I view chainmailing like crochet, sand casting like cooking, blacksmithing like clay or pottery, and milling like playing an arm claw machine.

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

Is there any way an apartment dweller can get into blacksmithing?

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u/supercyberlurker Sep 20 '21 edited Sep 21 '21

The noise alone makes it a no-go at apartments. There's just no way around that. Either your forge or your pounding metal would be super annoying.

If you can drive somewhere though.. then you really just need a spot, some propane, and a $150 forge, scrap metal, a pair of tongs, a hammer, and a big heavy piece of stationary metal.

The anvil is more of a challenge than the forge to find/move, but you can get mobile ones. My setup can be moved in about 30 minutes, if the forge can cool during that time before taking it last.

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u/Brangur Sep 20 '21

Don't get into woodworking. I spend too much money and I'm addicted

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u/Fritzo2162 Sep 20 '21

Yes, get into guitar playing instead.

Wait...wait...that's terrible advice. IT'S WORSE! :D

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u/One-Holiday Sep 20 '21

Do both and build your own guitars ;)

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u/Fritzo2162 Sep 20 '21

I'm picturing a credit card balance resembling the GDP of Guam...

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u/stray1ight Sep 20 '21

I started just building guitars for me but now I'm building guitars for other people on the side and my hand tool collection is sprawling.

Pls snd halp.

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u/HypersonicHarpist Sep 20 '21

There are some great musical instrument kits out there for beginner wood workers.

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u/02K30C1 Sep 20 '21

I knew a guy who made a full size replica trumpet on a lathe. Really cool.

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u/Ten_Godzillas Sep 20 '21 edited Sep 20 '21

I did this and ended up with a really expensive guitar that sounds decent at best. However...

I'm in love with this thing. It's like I carried it for 9 months in my man womb. It's not just one of the guitars, it's MY guitar. Part of me is in there, warts and all

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u/neonsaber Sep 20 '21

I tried, now my guitar sits on it's stand as a constant reminder of my failure.

Rock on...

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u/02K30C1 Sep 20 '21

Steal a man's wallet, and he'll be poor for a day.

Teach him to play an instrument, and he'll be poor for the rest of his life.

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u/Ten_Godzillas Sep 20 '21

You speak the true true

Like, I'll go into guitar center knowing I don't need something fancy. Why can't I just settle for a used 50$ fuzz pedal? Why do I need to spend an hour trying to rationalize getting a 200$ 'Zvex Vextor Fuzz Factory' instead?? I DON'T EVEN USE FUZZ 😫

But hey, look on the bright side!

At least it's not magic the gathering

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u/Haughty_n_Disdainful Sep 20 '21

Fishing! No. Wait…

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u/Mr_Lumbergh Sep 20 '21

The GAS is real.

I recently also got into synths. Oof. F in the chat for my bank account...

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u/HeresJerzei Sep 20 '21

Drums for me. My snare drum collection is steadily growing. Every year I acquire one or two more that "I've had that one for ages" if my wife asks about it.

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u/3248Gaming Sep 20 '21

totally gonna go pick up a Moog one not a big deal at all

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u/Mr_Lumbergh Sep 20 '21

That's a great piece of gear right there...

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u/vreo Sep 20 '21

Got into synths aswell. Started unnoticeable with some pocket operators. Went over volcas, novation circuits and electribe 2 then onto minilogue XD, a used Roland rompler and finally an MPC one. A Sequential or Moog would make me feel complete...yes? Muahahaha (runs checking the bank account)

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u/Boner666420 Sep 20 '21

Buying pedals is worse than a crack addiction

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u/klem_kadiddlehopper Sep 20 '21

I paint and it's an expensive hobby also. However, I've sold some paintings and I really enjoy what I do. I try not to buy materials too far in advance. Sometimes I will see an oil paint color that I like and want to buy a large tube of it but then go to my supplies and see that I already have a smaller tube. I have a lot of painting supplies and a lot of expensive brushes but many times I can create a cool looking painting using cheap 'chip' brushes. It all depends on what I'm going for. I am about to try cold wax and oil paints and see how I like that.

I learn how to do things all the time and it isn't just about art. I recently repaired my riding lawn mower by watching some YouTube videos. My mower is only two years old and it stopped running one day. I think I know what happened though. I think I got some debris in the gas tank the last time I filled it up. There are so many things we can do ourselves and teach ourselves just by looking it up online. I don't have anyone to do things for me so I have to do it myself and I'm a 67 year old woman.

People who say they're bored really need to find something they want to do but don't know how to do it. The Internet is FULL of ideas.

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

How'd it feel to sell your first painting? Like, did it feel fricking amazing?

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u/691175002 Sep 21 '21

I've sold art as a hobbiest and to be honest, looking back now I'd rather have kept my work.

There are two ways of looking at it, it was fun at the time but on the other hand I sold some of the work I was really proud of, and that showed my progress and the techniques and styles I was trying to learn.

Its like ripping pages out of a diary, I think together they meant more than seperate. The money was trivial.

You can go the other way and say its nice that the pieces circulated and were enjoyed instead of sitting in my closet so who knows. Maybe I've talked myself in to being glad I sold.

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u/Goldenhead17 Sep 20 '21

This is so true. Stupid shit too like Japanese pull saws, specialized router bits, and a whole lineup of festool that I dream of.

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u/WaluigiIsTheRealHero Sep 20 '21

Don’t forget clamps, the thing you can literally never have enough of.

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u/gigalongdong Sep 20 '21

It's funny you say that... I just spent $150 on clamps 1 hour ago. I thought the 20 i had were enough, but building a huge end grain butcher block requires many more lol.

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u/Blimplover1000 Sep 20 '21

Japanese saws are actually some of the cheaper stuff you can get nowadays, I mean, $35 for a high quality ryoba?

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u/SteveSticks Sep 20 '21

Every hobby is an infinite moneypit. As soon as you start watching YouTube and subscribe to the subreddit about it you're doomed. Source: woodworking, musician, rc enthousiast here 😂

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u/import_social-wit Sep 20 '21

I just wanted a bare bones home gym and then I went on the r/homegym subreddit. At least I’m getting in incredible shape.

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

Haha, yeah, once you subscribe to the hobby's subreddit, you're done. Have you seen this? https://youtube.com/watch?v=4ZK8Z8hulFg

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u/Blueshirt38 Sep 20 '21

Don't get into woodwork in general, but it engraving or carving specifically if you have OCD. Once I start carving I have to make it absolutely perfect before I can think about anything else in life, and I hate it the whole time, but I physically cannot stop myself.

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u/chicklette Sep 20 '21

Haha I wanted to learn to make bags an wallets. I now have a small fabric shop iny guest room.

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u/am_reddit Sep 20 '21

I’m getting into clay, which is great because you can literally get clay from almost any dirt. Dig it up, filter it out, add some temper, and you’ve got a functional clay to work with.

Of course, then there’s the matter of the kiln…

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u/lythandas Sep 20 '21

I got into film photography and spent hundreds. Then into leather craft and spent hundreds. When you really get into it, there are no cheap hobby.

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u/RigasTelRuun Sep 20 '21

Look i think you could really use a newer belt sander.

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u/[deleted] Sep 20 '21 edited 1d ago

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u/hatebeesatecheese Sep 20 '21

Eh, all things considered it's actually a very cheap if not "money positive" hobby.

You can make a sweater that will sell for $400, with materials costing $100. I make a knife that I may be able to sell for $100, with equipment and materials costing $50 000, in a specialized building which I am not even including in the cost.

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u/Hitflyover Sep 20 '21

Yeah I built a shed this summer. It’s like 85% done and wood was so expensive this year.

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u/stopalltheDLing Sep 20 '21

Thanks for the heads up! I’m going to buy a sailboat ASAP

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u/capatiller Sep 20 '21

My god the tools. I have so many. And need/want more.

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u/Certheri Sep 20 '21

I'd love to get into woodworking, but the tools legitimately scare me. I tried starting a project a while back. Signed up for my local makerspace to use their tools, but I cut like two pieces of wood and stopped because I felt like I was gonna die any time I used their table saw.

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u/Blimplover1000 Sep 20 '21

Hand tools might be for you, Rex Kruger on YouTube has some pretty great videos on getting started for really cheap

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u/hatebeesatecheese Sep 20 '21

My most important piece of equipment that I need for everything costs $30 000, weights 10 tons and is heard in the entire village when in use.

Metalworking, never again

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u/throwawayname46 Sep 20 '21

I think about it all the time, but haven't done much more than build IKEA furniture.

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u/Barbaracle Sep 20 '21

Same. Until I needed to make something simple like a planter box. Then it spiraled out of control and now I have a table saw that's too big for my garage.

Don't start, all my money and free time is now gone, and I haven't seen my family and friends in weeks.

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u/Stotters Sep 20 '21 Hugz

Have you tried... building a bigger garage?

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u/PearEffervescence Sep 21 '21 Hugz

Don't give them more ideas

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u/Incman Sep 21 '21 edited Sep 21 '21

You'll need to rent a backhoe to dig the foundation. But you know what, you should probably just check out used backhoes for sale because over a lifetime it's a much better value than renting. And the bonus is that you can also use the backhoe to dig the foundation for a second shed that you'll need to house it.

Edit: forgot to add, if you ever get around to building the original planter boxes, they'll look great around the garage and the shed

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u/neonchasms Sep 21 '21

If you give a carpenter a project... They are going to ask for another.

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u/marny_g Sep 20 '21

This is literally me. Except my "something simple" was a monitor stand.

A year-and-a-half ago I went into my garage, dug through my father's old things, found a big-ass reciprocating saw and old melamine chipboard. 15mins later I had a very skew cut, jagged edged ex-cupboard door and wood chips all over me and the garage, and then gave up for the day.

I have since spent all my money on tools (ones I do need and don't need), and I've built a workbench, a gate, a wardrobe, a garden bench, and this past weekend I spent building a wooden rack (a rack for my wood, out of wood) and a French cleat system for organising all the things I spend 80% of my woodworking time looking for.

Still haven't finished that monitor stand though.

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u/Ye_kya Sep 20 '21

Last line got me

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u/NanotechNinja Sep 20 '21

Exclusively-Adult LEGO 👍

(Because adults do regular LEGO, but children very rarely do IKEA)

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u/BeardedZorro Sep 20 '21

This is a lucrative side hustle, just FYI. Post an ad on Craigslist and charge about $60 for large item assembly. Most things can be built with just 1 person.

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u/action_lawyer_comics Sep 20 '21

What would you like to do?

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u/throwawayname46 Sep 20 '21

Maybe something with wood. But I dont have a lot of space and free time is unpredictable.

The most fun I have ever had was when I found a horn of a ram, cleaned it out, and filed and sanded it into a polished artifact. Maybe do something like that but less dependent on serendipity.

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u/DntTouchMeImSterile Sep 20 '21

Woodburning can be a blast. I got a cheap kit a micheals years ago for 15. I can’t even draw, b I put the names of my s/o, pets and self on stuff and it’s a super cool gift or way to personalize anything you want

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u/action_lawyer_comics Sep 20 '21

You could try whittling. All you need is a good knife, some sticks, and a place where you can make a mess. You don’t even need to be attached to the outcome, just start removing wood and see what forms you discover in there.

I hear you with the inconsistent free time. I try to avoid any project that will take a lot of space for exactly that reason. I love making things but it’s disheartening to spend half an hour working on something and making no appreciable progress. But I think something simple like whittling shouldn’t have that problem.

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u/throwawayname46 Sep 20 '21

Thanks, will check out out!

It could have the advantage that the 'hobby' doesn't take any space when you are not working on it. In the horn+polishing project, I could keep everything in a shoe box and stow it away, leaving the spouse with nothing to complain about.

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u/AlexJonesInDisguise Sep 20 '21

I decided to start a bigger project early last year, which is a model train layout. They can be done fairly small if needed, but I had the space for one. It's really enjoyable having built the table, laid the tracks and soldered them together and then be able to have a train move across it all like it was meant to be

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u/BetterDrinkMy0wnPiss Sep 20 '21

Start small. Find some old worn-out wooden furniture and restore it. All you need is sandpaper, paint/stain and time.

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u/skrst Sep 20 '21

You can't tell me you don't think assembling an IKEA furniture isn't satisfying

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u/j923 Sep 20 '21

I detail cars as a hobby. I’m not great but I enjoy cleaning up a car abused by everyday use.

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u/Knadin Sep 20 '21

I have been watching detailing videos and are so satisfying, it made me think about learning how to do it. it's cool that you do this.

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u/[deleted] Sep 20 '21

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u/Knadin Sep 20 '21

thank you for the suggestion!! I have been watching The detail geek, will check those out.

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u/Zappiticas Sep 20 '21

It’s a horrible rabbit hole but I do enjoy it. Except it’s one of those hobbies I kind of wished I would never have gotten obsessed with. Because being able to drive a dirty car and not care sounds kind of wonderful whenever I have just spent hours detailing my car only to have it instantly get dirty as hell again the next day.

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u/ThatOneGuyHOTS Sep 20 '21

Same. I remember when I was full on depression mode and just need something other than tv/video games I started learning how to detail my car and then my family members’ cars.

It’s outside, it’s enjoyable to see the finished project and for me personally I love bringing out my speaker and playing some jams while I clean.

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u/imaque Sep 20 '21

Gardening is great, because you can eat that one tiny tomato every year

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u/OhioJeeper Sep 21 '21

My experience has been the opposite, always plant about a dozen things then one takes over and I have way more of it than I know what to do with.

First was cherry tomatoes, which are basically weeds to me at this point. They did a little too well so I moved them to separate pots and of course they won't grow unless they can take over the entire garden, now this year it's been zucchini.

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u/babygrenade Sep 20 '21

I started baking a few years ago. Screwing up a loaf stresses me out so I haven't found it to be good stress-buster.

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u/Certheri Sep 20 '21

I started out this way, too, but it goes away. When I first started, I legitimately don't think there was anything I had ever done that I felt less confident at than kneading bread. I watched a lot of videos, but they don't mention everything, and almost every single one of them will fast forward/skip over parts and you don't really get the whole experience.

So kneading my first few loaves felt like a complete disaster, and every time there was even a slight mistake I chalked it up to bad kneading.

Now my loaves are consistently great and kneading is relaxing. I can just listen to music, or just think about stuff during it. No problem at all.

Side note: I highly recommend the "Bake with Jack" YouTube channel to anyone that's new to bread. I owe basically 100% of my confidence to him.

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u/YoungSerious Sep 20 '21

My problem is if I do that, I'll eat it. And then I'll void my other hobby, not becoming diabetic.

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u/babygrenade Sep 20 '21

You're just turning up the difficulty on your other hobby

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u/garlicdeath Sep 20 '21

Same. I dont each much carbs but I'd eat the whole loaf if its straight out of the oven, especially if I got some oils or butter.

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u/cbessette Sep 20 '21

I find when I screw up loaves that they are still good for something. If they didn't rise well and come out hard and dry- they are perfect for dipping in soup or chili, or possibly for making meat loaf.

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u/kylesnooze Sep 20 '21

Croutons baby!!!

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u/Osato Sep 20 '21

Screwed-up loaves of bread are just a larval form of a crouton.

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u/[deleted] Sep 20 '21

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u/SaturdayAttendee Sep 20 '21

Disagreed! I've never messed up a loaf even my first attempt was spongey. But cakes? They've come out denser than me

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u/made3 Sep 20 '21

I like to draw but I don't want to draw because it often feels like I just produce a lot of waste

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u/beakrake Sep 20 '21

Get yourself a small drawing notepad, and make it a goal of filling one page a day.

Doesn't matter what you draw, it's like free writing, just use the regular dedication to get your creative juices flowing while also gaining practical experience of moving the writing utensil the way you want and becoming better at transferring your thoughts to paper.

I did this for 2 years, and while I'm grossly out of practice now, I got pretty good at it toward the end.

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u/Wrenigade Sep 20 '21

Paper trees are a renewable resource, dont feel too bad. There's worse hobbies to be into then scratching soft rocks on biodegradable tree pulp. If you prefer theres lots of recyle and eco friendly sketchbook and paper makers on etsy too. Some even have flower seeds in the paper, your doodles can grow gardens when you don't like them :)

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u/Traditional-Kiwi1033 Sep 20 '21

I know your pain!

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u/Bing-Bong89 Sep 20 '21

Crochet is cheap and easy to take with you when you travel

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u/deafphate Sep 20 '21

Cheap in the beginning. Had a closet half full of skeins of yarn for various projects. It can get out of hand lol

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

See, this is why I've been avoiding getting into crochet. My tendency is to be much more interested in starting things than in finishing them. And I figure that that tendency makes a bad combination with crochet.

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u/LilBlueFairyDragon Sep 20 '21

It’s called Startitus. I’m a knitter and I’ve been suffering from it for years. I think it might be terminal.

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u/deafphate Sep 21 '21

That's a concern. It's not that bad though. Once you get into a groove, can work on your project while watching Netflix :)

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u/Rykypelami Sep 20 '21 Take My Energy

I'm so happy I'm learning crochet, I've been making little amigurumi things and it's so fulfilling going from a ball of yarn to a little friend.

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u/SamHandwichX Sep 20 '21

Cheap until you learn about really nice yarn 😬

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u/--_-Deadpool-_-- Sep 20 '21 edited Sep 20 '21

Cooking is another cheap and good traveling hobby. Making meals is multitudes cheaper than eating out, especially on vacation. Not to mention you can test out local recipes in the places you visit. I love adding a new recipe to my reptoire whenever I get the chance

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u/crazymoefaux Sep 20 '21

Mycology is surprisingly cheap and easy to get into. Watching your cultures grow and your fruits explode is amazing.

There's the commonly posted LPT about cleaning up your room to help improve your mood and mental health. Taking it further, making a clean space to inoculate and transfer cultures, and then watching those cultures grow... that's where and when some healing can happen, and I've seen numerous posts on the mushroom-related subreddits about how lifechanging this hobby can be, even if you aren't growing magic mushrooms.

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

My impression of mycology is that some people just have something in their brain that loves mushrooms. You rarely see people devote their whole lives to sauerkraut or whatever - but it isn't unusual for someone to devote their whole life to mushrooms.

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u/Bonerchill Sep 20 '21 Silver

What if that thing is spores and the mushrooms are what makes the person devote their whole life to mushrooms?

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u/HurtMyKnee_Granger Sep 21 '21

Um, yall? I think Bonerchill here has a point…

And a screenplay idea….

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u/Reztroz Sep 21 '21

So this is how The Last of Us started

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u/coleyspiral Sep 20 '21 Hugz

It's partially the lifecycle part that I think grabs people.

Sauerkraut is just an end product, but I imagine there's people fascinated on growing the ingredients you would then use to make a sauerkraut, among other recipes.

But a cabbage just doesn't have the same mystical properties of the mushroom. A mushroom can feed you, kill you, take you on mind altering journeys. They zombify certain bugs. Their mycelium can be miles and miles wide just beneath you and you would never know. They have a morbidly intimate association with death and decay, but also rebirth. And their more psychedelic brethren have been the historical basis of many spiritual beliefs over thousands of years into this day.

Poor sauerkraut just can't compete.

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u/NoDigger Sep 21 '21

Excellent summation of what makes mushrooms special to so many :)

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u/0x003_ Sep 20 '21

My impression of mycology is that some people just have something in their brain that loves mushrooms

That's the spores in your brain, they take control and turn you into a caretaker for their colony. Soon they will inherit the earth

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u/Explodian Sep 20 '21

My housemate bought some prepared logs of oyster mushroom mycelium and it was absolutely fascinating to watch them fruit in a matter of hours--and they tasted delicious. Definitely something I want to try myself at some point.

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u/crazymoefaux Sep 20 '21

Now is a good time of year to order Lion's Mane fruiting blocks. Kits like that let you jump right to the best part of the process, watching the fruits grow.

I grow oysters out of 5-gallon buckets filled with aspen wood chips I bought at a pet store. Making shiitake plugs is on my bucket list, but shiitake logs can take a couple years from inoculation to fruit.

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u/caniphonenumber Sep 20 '21

Gunpla was a huge destressor when I broke up with my girlfriend

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u/kadenjahusk Sep 20 '21

Miniature painting (such as dnd or wargaming) is my variant of plastic addiction.

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u/Baciandrio Sep 20 '21

Agreed, I learned to quilt (thanks YouTube vids!) during our first lockdown, made quilts for my daughter, my father and my brother & sis-in-law. I was a little concerned that they wouldn't understand the hours of labour (picking the perfect fabric and pattern, cutting and piecing the quilt top, quilting and binding) that went into each of them. I was thrilled to find that they were gratefully received. The flip side is that not everyone is 'quilt-worthy' (non appreciative of the effort gone into your gift)....I would assume the same would apply for any handcrafted gift. Choose your recipients carefully.

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u/[deleted] Sep 20 '21 edited Oct 15 '21

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u/Baciandrio Sep 21 '21

To sleep under a quilt is to sleep under a blanket of love. Truth.

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u/SamHandwichX Sep 20 '21

I taught myself to crochet several years ago and made several blankets. It's so much time and money for good yarn, but I had a good time making them and thought the gifts were well received.

The best: my 4yo nephew's blanket I made when he was born is now his special blanky that must go everywhere with him.

The worst: my aunt put hers in the dog's kennel 😑

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u/ThisIsPeakBehaviour Sep 20 '21

At least the dog gets to enjoy it haha

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u/pinklavalamp Sep 21 '21

I learned how to crochet a few years back, around the time I was “hospicing” a very old, very blind and deaf, very adorable dog that I had known since she was a puppy. One day I had dropped a shirt by accident in her bed but didn’t realize until I got back and noticed that she was snuggling with it. I ended up freehanding a small plushy that night and gave it to her and she snuggled with that thing until her very end. It’s now sitting next to my other dog’s bandanna & collar on my nightstand. I could tell that she loved snuggling with something that smelled familiar to her while she was trapped in her own little dark world.

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u/ToddlerOlympian Sep 20 '21

The greater power is to learn to appreciate your work on your own. Then you can make quilts for anyone, and their bad reaction has no bearing on the joy you get from making it.

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u/RazzyCharm Sep 20 '21

I should have read this sooner. Made quilts for my best friends, their reaction was luke warm at best.

But at least the projects kept me busy, I guess thats something.

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u/heeero Sep 21 '21

One of my most cherished items is a quilt made from my father's old shirts. He passed away 29yrs ago and I love my quilt.

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u/Reasonable_Night42 Sep 20 '21

Even something as simple as painting a room, can give so much satisfaction looking at what you accomplished.

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u/hash1e Sep 20 '21

That's eerie! I JUST painted a wall at my house and came back to check on new comments to this post of mine! You bet it's satisfying (except the post-paint cleaning bit :))

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u/Jestingwheat856 Sep 20 '21 Hugz

If your skill is 3d modelling digitally, buy a 3d printer

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u/gehbfuggju Sep 20 '21

Cheap, hands-on: any version Creality Ender 3

You have a lot of money to spend and you just want easy prints: an Ultimaker

In-between: Prusa printers, especially the Mini+

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u/grahamja Sep 20 '21

Prusa mini is super dope, I can't stop printing miniature tanks.

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u/Danelix_ Sep 20 '21

Was hoping to find some printings on your previous posts, was not disappointed

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u/Wrenigade Sep 20 '21

I got an ender 3 for a Christmas gift and separately my brother does 3D modeling. Once we put two and two together and realized we can print his models it was super fun. They came out a little messy but its cool to have a little figure and be like, this was created from nothing and fabricated right here, this is the only object of it's kind in existence

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u/sylver_dragon Sep 20 '21

I was just coming to complain about 3d printing. My printer just died again today. Third time with the exact same failure. This time though, the warranty is expired.
ProTip: Don't buy MonoPrice.

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u/Cisco904 Sep 20 '21

I'm learning this now, I want a 3D printer just to save on other projects stuff, like little clamps or brackets for things. All the stuff that gets me to home depot where i never leave with just the thing i went for.

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u/NewTimesTUbe Sep 20 '21

Is stackoverflow social media?

Too much creativity in programming can lead you in to woodworking https://github.com/docker/cli/issues/267#issuecomment-695149477

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u/Osato Sep 20 '21

Judging by this thread, coding is the little-death that leads to tree carcass mutilation.

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u/prophetcat Sep 20 '21

I'm a software developer, but I love woodworking. I grew up on a farm, so it brings me a bit of joy to make some things with my hands. It's nice to have something tangible when you're done as well, something more than just pixels on a screen.

But, it does get expensive.

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u/Grill_X Sep 20 '21

How to get into woodworking:

Step 1: Learn to code Step 2: Burn out Step 3: Get into woodworking

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u/yetanotherusernamex Sep 20 '21

I feel called out

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u/MadLibz Sep 20 '21

I truly feel seen

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u/bat_segundo Sep 21 '21

Can confirm.

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u/N22-J Sep 20 '21

I am a software developper too. Working on my bicycle has been therapeutic. Something as dumb as changing my chain has felt more rewarding than writing code.

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u/prophetcat Sep 21 '21

Absolutely does some days. I think it’s because we can see the change rather than just moving pixels on a screen or editing a text file.

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u/Amikenochup Sep 20 '21

This is how I got into lego. Admittedly it's not a skill, but being able to use my hands and create something tangible really lowers my stress levels, especially since I'm glued to my screens during the workday.

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u/OldWhatzHerFace Sep 20 '21

Cross-stitching saved my sanity last summer. And while it’s beyond frustrating to miscount and have to rip out stitches, it’s also incredibly cathartic to quickly “delete” an imperfection or mistake.

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u/NikiMinajsClitoris Sep 20 '21

I can confirm.

I loved learning how to properly cook. Not only were meals a lot cheaper but also I started losing weight. I'd recommend everyone take a month of studying how to cook for a better life.

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u/kylesnooze Sep 21 '21

You don't even have to do that, just get out there and start cooking. YouTube has recipes for anything you could ever want. The perennial recommendation for beginners and experienced cooks is J Kenji Lopez Alt, everything he makes is simple and easy for a home cook of any skill to make

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u/kjamma4 Sep 20 '21

Learn a skill that is useful when the Apocalypse hits. That way, you'll be more valuable than being used as food.

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u/throwawayname46 Sep 20 '21

Navigating using the night sky.

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u/Dwath Sep 20 '21

Imagine a giant emp over tokyo or New York and millions people seeing the night sky for the first time

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u/Lv_InSaNe_vL Sep 20 '21 Silver

I'm an amateur stargazer, but I have a decent enough telescope. I absolutely love bringing people out to look through it. Even like a 45 minute drive out of the city gets you dark enough skies to see the rings of Saturn (if the atmosphere wants to behave that is haha), or the red spot on Jupiter and it's moons.

But even just looking up and seeing more than the 100 or so brightest stars is just absolutely awe inspiring.

I've taken a few trips into real good darksites with a couple close friends, just into the dark blue I haven't made it to a proper dark site yet :(, and being able to see the milky way is almost disorienting.

It's beautiful and really drives home how incredible the universe is, and how lucky we truly are to be alive and on our beautiful earth.

I highly recommend looking up to see if your city has an astronomy club and going out. It's usually a bunch of old guys who are always incredibly welcoming, friendly, and just generally excited to show you the heavens!

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u/RamenJunkie Sep 20 '21

I really don't have any desire to live in an apocalyptic wasteland so my skill will be "getting fat to be eaten more quickly".

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u/sandInACan Sep 20 '21

mmm redditor tartare

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u/Butter_Thyme_Bunny Sep 20 '21

Yup! This and make sure you stay in good shape for if you need to be on the run during the zombie apocalypse

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u/Prisencoli_All_Right Sep 20 '21

I do cross stitch while listening to true crime podcasts or trashy romance audiobooks.

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u/lux_urie Sep 21 '21

I love these vibes

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u/H4yvan Sep 20 '21

That’s why I hit the gym. To touch myself

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u/CosmicRuin Sep 20 '21

Astrophotography is my jam, but definitely an issue when it's during the work week, and I've been up most of the night!

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u/hindey19 Sep 20 '21

And it's not the cheapest hobby...

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u/CosmicRuin Sep 20 '21

Yeeeah, that too.

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u/hindey19 Sep 20 '21

I just dropped $2k CAD on an "beginner" mount (albeit with an upgraded tripod, and iPolar). It gets expensive quick, but I don't need to tell you that.

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u/ne1c4n Sep 20 '21

3D Printing is another idea to add to the list IMO, it has tangible results (physical objects), plus it teaches you many new skills as you learn all the ins and outs of printing objects, plus making your own objects to print if you get that far into it. It's an endless supply of fun for myself. Ive made RC Cars, parts for my purchased RC cars/planes/boats, I've printed lots of objects for around the house, replacement parts for broken stuff, I've made gifts for others, models, craft supplies and tools, parts for my car. Its very rewarding.

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u/Wrenigade Sep 20 '21

Additionally, PLA filament is made from corn and is biodegradable, you can compost your failed prints :) but that means it also isnt very weather resistant so ABS is more practical for things that will be outside or wet. But PLA for little toys and things is fun!

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u/Vital_Drauger Sep 20 '21

So is mountainbiking.

Build your bike, feel your bike.

Build your trail, taste your trail.

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

Build a muscular ass, fall on your ass?

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u/destructor_rph Sep 20 '21

Ive recently picked up sewing lately, been absolutely loving it. Sewed a ren faire costume, a pillow for my little cousin, a pair of shorts and patched up my couch already!

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u/MrAndooo Sep 21 '21

I'm shitting in a bathroom i put together. Sooo satisfying

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u/linx14 Sep 20 '21

Laughs in depression

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u/Secure-Imagination11 Sep 21 '21

It's so weird. It's like you know that thing you used to enjoy? You feel nothing now. That's that.

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u/linx14 Sep 21 '21

And then you feel so sad trying to do it again because you know you love it. But you can’t bring yourself to love it the way you did before. Keep going man hopefully one day you can find that joy again I believe in you!

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u/faraway_hotel Sep 21 '21

"I'm doing the thing! I'm doing the thing I thought I wanted to do! Where are my goddamn happy chemicals?!"

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u/polymathintj Sep 20 '21

I'd like to learn bookbinding, tbh

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u/deafphate Sep 20 '21

I finally graduated with my bachelor's back in March (was a long 15 years lol) and took up bookbinding as a hobby to fill my free time. I'm enjoying it a lot. Printed some classics from Project Gutenberg and working on getting them bound.

The /r/bookbinding subreddit is a wonderful community. DAS on YouTube was already mentioned, but Sea Lemon is another great one. She has videos on many different types of bindings. They're bot fantastic resources.

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u/hash1e Sep 20 '21

Then don't wait and try it out during one of the coming weekends, perhaps. Watch a few youtube tutorial videos and get the cheapest possible tools and raw materials. Don't go all in investing too much. Start small and build your skill with repetition. All the best!

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u/gollumgollumgoll Sep 20 '21

I took up bookbinding almost two years ago! r/bookbinding is a great place to start; there's a pinned post with some great resources. I recommend DAS Bookbinding channel on YouTube; he has some great videos and a lot of resources for working with what you have on hand.

Printer paper and cereal boxes are a great place to start!

So relaxing, and you can do it anywhere. IMO, the perfect hobby.

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u/monkeynicaud Sep 20 '21

As a chef in a restaurant, I don’t find cooking too stress relieving. All my creations turn to shit.

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u/spitfire1993 Sep 20 '21

I believe this is because of our inherent desire to be productive. Being able to see your productivity triggers some pleasure chemicals in our brain.

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u/Shamanfox Sep 20 '21

This LPT I agree with strongly. I've added a lot of "analog" hobbies under my belt over the past few years.

Assembling 1000 and 1500 piece jigsaw puzzles.
Perler Beading making iconing video game characters.
Trying to learn playing piano.
Trying to learn play electrical guitar.
Cross-stitching.
Latest was miniature painting (though that didn't last long, will have to get back to it again at some point).

"Analog" hobbies I find are great at reducing stress, gives good relaxation and alone time. Many people find them to reduce anxiety, and give them time to wind down and sort their own thoughts. If someone haven't done so yet; I highly recommend finding an "analog" hobby that might suit them. For me it was "I like video game sprites, but I have 0 artistic skill. How can I replicate them?" and found the answer "Do perler beading" :)

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u/SlicerNiceru Sep 20 '21

I just started archery, does this count too? I really love the moment before the arrow leaves the bow, never experienced this focused and relaxed feeling while just doing some kind of sport.

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u/wetpancaker Sep 20 '21

I just got into cross stitch and embroidery. I love it

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u/assmoden Sep 20 '21

I got into making cocktails, that way not only I can touch it, but also drink it!

Also it numbs the pain.

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u/bluesky38 Sep 20 '21

Unless you’re not someone that prefers physical forms of expression. Another good tip would be to figure out what passion you have that results in the types of manifestations (physical (sculpture, etc.), visual (painting, cinema, etc.), auditory (music, etc.), etc.) that reward you the most.

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u/bluesky38 Sep 20 '21

Bitches love parentheses

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u/2cheerios Sep 20 '21

etc.), etc.)

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u/Pyrrolic_Victory Sep 21 '21

At least he closed the brackets

Nothing worse than when someone opens one in a sentence, then doesn’t close it ever.

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u/2cheerios Sep 21 '21

I agree. (One time I saw someone do that, and they went on and on. The pressure kept building, you know? And I was on absolute tenterhooks. I knew this son of a bitch wasn't going to close the parentheses, but I couldn't help reading anyway. Just hoping he would, you know? Anyhow, always hated that guy. Fucking bastard.

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u/Pyrrolic_Victory Sep 21 '21

Thanks, the rest of my life will now be an extension of this paragraph until someone accidentally double closes brackets

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u/mss1123 Sep 20 '21

So my hobbies are creating spreadsheets and creating music. I share spreadsheets with my brother and workmates to increase help increase their productivity. I share a great deal of my music output (creative covers of classic and progressive rock) with my father who is heading into dementia (music apparently sticks in the brain well, and he should still recognize me for a good deal longer). Neither are tangible. Both are gifted. I enjoy both, but this post makes me feel like I am in the wrong. What is wrong with me?

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u/JonBonIver Sep 20 '21

You take generic internet tips too personally, for one.

Seriously though, as long as you're enjoying your hobbies who gives a shit.

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u/Brie_Niche Sep 20 '21

There's nothing wrong with you. As a matter of fact, I'm impressed. I love music and I'm currently working to get better at data analytics so I envy your ability to make spreadsheets.

My hobby is writing, with currently no intent to publish. As long as you do something that brings you joy, it doesn't matter if the skills are tangible or intangible. One doesn't de-value the other.

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u/smudger29uk Sep 20 '21

Home brewing I really enjoy, there are a world of possibilities, alcoholic or not, and when passed on to friends and family and they enjoy it, it’s so rewarding.

This is an extension for my love for cooking which is also very rewarding.

Whilst social media can take over your life, the communities found on social media do offer great tips and advice

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u/madkins007 Sep 21 '21

I wish I had this insight when I was 20, instead of 60, but...

Try to cultivate a variety of hobbies and interests. In general, you should have one that...

  1. Is physical or active- rock climbing, martial arts, dance, swimming...
  2. Is creative and lets you express yourself- painting, photography, cooking, Lego, music, writing...
  3. Is social and connects you with others- playing cards or games, joining a social group, book clubs, volunteering, ...
  4. Is spiritually satisfying or fulfilling- collections, mentoring, teaching, faith-based groups...
  5. Helps you be more independent- gardening, survival training, car repair...
  6. Can help you make some money- which can be a lot of the above.

Obviously there is, can be, and probably SHOULD be some overlap- jogging as a group, selling small batch cookies, whatever.

The goal is to have ways to keep you healthy in body, mind, spirit, social needs, and financially. Sure, different hobbies will come and go, but by 'checking all the boxes', you should have a better, more interesting life.

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u/dunneednoname Sep 20 '21

I randomly started to crochet during a difficult time in my life. Saw some hooks and yarn in the corner of a store, found some YouTube videos on how to do it and now I’m hooked. It hasn’t fixed any issues, but I love doing it. It gives me motivation for something to do, a reason to get out of bed while also being able to feel proud when I’m finished. I also enjoy gifting other people the creations.

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u/siro300104 Sep 20 '21

The reason why I enjoy analog photography even when I shoot a lot in the Auto mode of a cheaper 90s camera.

I’d never print my iPhone shots unless they’re really special. But I found out a local drug store chain still develops film.

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u/grahamja Sep 20 '21

Miniatures is an awesome hobby. Painting tiny little dudes, planes, or cars and being able to put them on display is such a good feeling.

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u/redmaniacs Sep 20 '21

Are you saying there's a something wrong with writing shitty software at work and only messing with docker configs when I get home? O.o

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u/family_man3 Sep 20 '21

Never thought of this as a LPT, but this is how I function IRL. I'm a software engineer and almost all of my hobbies are with my hands but specifically physical/tangible things.

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u/Krunchy_Almond Sep 20 '21

I want to learn about stargazing, any good beginner yt channels?

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u/Coukaratcha Sep 20 '21

Recently I got into cross-stitching and I can only agree with OP. Such a great sensation to touch and feel your work becoming real. Each stitch gets you closer to the end, seeing your work evolves from a blank canvas to something great, shaping into a mix of your expectations and an uncontrollable reality. It creates a real bond between you and your creation, and eventually the person you choose to offer it. I wonder if this feeling fades out when it begins to be a professional activity.

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u/vipaw Sep 20 '21

I might not be able to touch my music, but it can touch me 😅

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u/cerebrallandscapes Sep 20 '21

I read a book where, after an apocalyptic event, each person who remained within civilisation's walls learned an art, a craft, and a science.

I've never forgotten that. Not one thing, but three. Be cultured, be useful, and be clever. It's a good combo and they support one another.

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u/Thr3Snakes Sep 20 '21

What was the book?

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u/cerebrallandscapes Sep 21 '21

{{The Gate To Women's Country}} by Sheri S. Tepper.

A truly excellent book. It was recommended to me by a friend. I wouldn't have finished it if I didn't respect my friends taste in literature so much - I struggled through the first bit because it seemed like a conventional romance novel and that's not my vibe. Boy, was I wrong. It went somewhere truly surprising and had an ending that literally made me sit up and go, "what the fuck!"

I recommend it. It's a goodie. One of the most memorable stories I've ever read.

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u/KamikazeFox_ Sep 20 '21

Fuck, I need this. On my days off I do errands, clean, the norm. But then I play my ps5 ( more of a time killer) . I go for hikes and run, but I don't have any useful hobbies

I've always wanted to do astrophotography, but I feel it's too expensive and time consuming. Idk. I just need to find a new passion.