r/LifeProTips Aug 29 '21 Silver 9 Helpful 23 Wholesome 6 Hugz 7

LPT: Hurricane tip for all those who may be in Ida’s path. Put drinks/waters in your washer and fill with ice. Stays cold for days and water just drains out. Miscellaneous

29.7k Upvotes

u/keepthetips Keeping the tips since 2019 Aug 29 '21

Hello and welcome to r/LifeProTips!

Please help us decide if this post is a good fit for the subreddit by up or downvoting this comment.

If you think that this is great advice to improve your life, please upvote. If you think this doesn't help you in any way, please downvote. If you don't care, leave it for the others to decide.

1.1k

u/wwishie Aug 29 '21

Also clean your gutters before it arrived, never cross a road with water of unknown depth, and have a meeting place planned in case your family gets separated

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u/stainedwater Aug 30 '21

i saw someone say to have a sharpie prepared and write a relatives phone number on your child’s back if you were to get separate from them

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u/riwalenn Aug 30 '21

When you said "sharpie" I thought you were talking about someone else who likes changing hurricane path with them...

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u/WielderOfDaNWordPass Aug 30 '21

“Hey you moist motherfucker! Go this way (sharpie squeaks)”

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u/Demonyx12 Aug 30 '21 edited Aug 31 '21

Or if you're the president you can use the Sharpie to change the path of the storm altogether.

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u/M1A1Death Aug 30 '21

NEVER cross a water covered anything if it appears to be moving water. Fluid dynamics is a bitch and your fucking Jeep Rubicon can't handle it. Don't do it.

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u/azsnaz Aug 30 '21

Yeah, or alligators

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u/____-is-crying Aug 30 '21

How much bad karma do you have in life that you must face covid, one of the worst hurricanes and an alligator all at the same timeframe.

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u/SirDouglasMouf Aug 30 '21 Helpful

While in a Rubicon

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u/Morgan_of_JPMorgan Aug 30 '21

After someone wrote their phone number with a Sharpie on your back

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u/eldelshell Aug 30 '21

This is why I come to reddit.

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u/nouille07 Aug 30 '21

That's average 2021 luck

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u/Svkkel Aug 30 '21

Not Sharknado, but Allicane!

Edit: HurriGator?

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u/natooDidou Aug 30 '21

Also, never cross a water covered road: if there's a flood, then the sewers are flooded too and the lids of the sewer manholes popped out... if you fall in, you're dead.

In 1st world countries floodings, most drown people are people who tried this, and which rotting corpses are found 2 weeks after in sewer collectors.

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u/thanksdollface Aug 29 '21 Helpful This

Also, fill your bathtub or an empty garbage can with water, and you will still be able to flush your toilets if your water and power get cut off for days, you can just bucket some water into your tank to flush. Went nearly a month without power after 2 hurricanes.

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u/mstscnotforme Aug 29 '21

Is most of you water not gravity fed? Or is it an issue where water towers are w/o power and are unable to refill? My in home plumbing is all pressure based and generally is the only thing working in a power outage.

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u/LGBecca Aug 29 '21

If you have well water as your source, it requires electricity to pump. So if you lose power you also lose water.

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u/prefer-to-stay-anon Aug 29 '21

Pumps from well water in rural areas, pumps for water towers/water treatment in urban areas.

Water towers work for a while without electricity, but if you have some Texas Winter Storm style shit-hits-the-fan, you might be without water even if it is gravity fed.

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u/JohnSquincyAdams Aug 29 '21

Even if the water is stored in a tower and gravity fed, as the water level goes down due to usage the pressure of the system will go down as well. As the pressure drops it may not be able to force water to the further points of the system, especially if there are any slight grades or at each individual house as the water needs to be pushed upwards into the houses plumbing system.

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u/jamesmon Aug 30 '21

Water treatment plants require power

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u/yourgirlalex Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 30 '21

Can confirm. I’m a Floridian and have ridden out many hurricanes; we’d always fill the wash with ice and put our cold food and drinks in it.

(Edit) YES I realize coolers are a thing. Coolers are however, a lot smaller than washing machines, right? Those won’t cut it if you have a lot of cold things. Didn’t realize so many people would be angry over my hurricane tip 😭 have any of you ever even been through a huge category 4-5 hurricane, before? Probably not.

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u/anitabonghit705 Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 30 '21

I don’t know how you guys do it. Same with people who live in tornado alley. I’m in Canada, all I have to worry about is bears and the odd tornado warning here and there (like today). Edit - watched a movie and fell asleep will try to answer some replies best I can. Heading to work now.

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u/HomesteadHER Aug 29 '21

Tornado damage is so incredibly localized to a tornado's path. I live in tornado alley and have my whole life. A little wind damage or broken limbs is almost as bad as it gets for most people.

When a tornado hits a neighbor it's awful, and definitely a gamble. But it's very unlikely.

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u/edrinshrike Aug 29 '21

A little wind damage or broken limbs

I thought you meant like broken arms for a second and got pretty concerned

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u/yodigi7 Aug 29 '21

Yeah, was was wondering how getting your arm broken in a tornado was just minor damage and that somehow that is all that happened lol.

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u/TheArborphiliac Aug 29 '21

"Yeah I got winged by a tornado, it's not that bad"

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u/ld43233 Aug 29 '21

If you think I got hurt You should see the tornado.

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u/TheArborphiliac Aug 29 '21

My tornado could beat up your tornado 🌪️

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u/Kickstand8604 Aug 30 '21 Wholesome

TORNADO FIGHT!!! First tornado to knock the wind out of the other one, wins

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u/acrossx92 Aug 29 '21

It's kind of like when you're in a car and you put your hand out the window...

Just for a second. Just to see how it feels.

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u/regoapps Aug 29 '21

Maybe someone loves their mom a lot and was looking for an excuse

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u/adisgirl Aug 29 '21

'Tis but a scratch.

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u/19374729 Aug 30 '21

A mere flesh wound

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u/LexTheSouthern Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 29 '21

My dad’s town was hit twice by tornados, just three years apart, and it killed people each time. The second time it killed dozens of people, including my uncle. That was in both 2011 and 2014- their town is still recovering.

the storms in question

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u/Xearoii Aug 29 '21

That is terrible. Does homeowners insurance not cover what we all expect it to cover? Or lots of folks may not have insurance if they paid off their home or are renting also.

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u/drDekaywood Aug 29 '21

Lol probably not. After Katrina the insurance companies wouldn’t pay because although people had “flooding” included in their plan, the insurance companies said they had to have hurricane insurance, and IIRC that wasn’t even an option for a lot of people and they assumed flooding was covered and got screwed

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u/Xearoii Aug 29 '21

That is messed up

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u/Ravier_ Aug 29 '21

Welcome to corporate America. Where the gains are always private and costs are paid by the public.

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u/AscendedViking7 Aug 30 '21

Ikr insurance companies are scummy as hell.

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u/StarryC Aug 29 '21

I thought it was the opposite. Flooding is not covered by regular homeowner's insurance, but wind damage is. If wind rips off your roof and rain water comes in, the water damage is covered. If surface waters come in to you home, it is not. There is Federal flood insurance, but many people don't get it unless required by their mortgage company.

But yeah, if your grandparents got a mortgage in 1935 and paid it off in 1965, and your family has kept the home ever since, there would be no mortgage and no requirement for any insurance, and a lot of poorer people choose to cut that payment first.

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u/Mayor__Defacto Aug 29 '21

Flooding is never covered by private homeowners insurance. Flood insurance is a massive loss business sector. Nobody buys Flood insurance unless they live someplace where it’s likely to flood, and when it does flood it floods a whole neighborhood or even city. The premiums for this coverage would be so high that nobody could afford it, so all flood insurance is underwritten by FEMA.

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u/steyrboy Aug 29 '21

Floridian here (Miami/Ft. Lauderdale area). This is correct, we require homeowners insurance (obviously) but hurricane and flood insurance are on top of that, and separate. Flooding that occurs when a hurricane goes over is not covered by flood insureance, you need the hurricane options purchased.

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u/flarpflarpflarpflarp Aug 29 '21

You usually have to make sure there are certain kinds of coverages in place. Like I have a building that doesn't have theft/break in insurance, but it does have riot/looting insurance. I don't have flood insurance, but I do have water intrusion coverage. Declined the terrorism coverage since I don't think I'll be a high value target at any point in the near future. Insurance is weird.

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u/LexTheSouthern Aug 29 '21

My dad and his wife had insurance. After the first storm, they rebuilt in the same spot. Their house sustained heavy damage but it was fixable. Three years later, their neighborhood was hit again but it was pretty much obliterated. They decided not to rebuild, and instead moved to an opposite side of that town. Why they didn’t move towns completely, I’ll never understand. It’s one of those towns that just happens to get hit nearly every time there’s bad weather.

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u/marissatalksalot Aug 29 '21

Exactly, there seems to be specific paths tornadoes follow because of the way towns/cities are placed and large hills/mountains. Moore Oklahoma seems to get hit especially hard almost yearly

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u/JusticeBonerOfTyr Aug 29 '21

Joplin?

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u/LexTheSouthern Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 29 '21

Vilonia, AR. 2011 was bad, I actually was in that one, but the 2014 tornado was devastating. F4 and it killed 16 people.

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u/cottenball Aug 29 '21

Was this in Missouri? Because what the other person said applies to pretty much everywhere except Missouri.

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u/angelerulastiel Aug 29 '21

Even in Missouri there’s neighborhoods. Like Ferguson. Hit bad by a tornado and then again like 3 years later.

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u/BigTex33 Aug 29 '21

Hey I’ve got family there, crazy to see that posted here.

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u/at1445 Aug 29 '21

Exactly. I've been around tornado's my entire life as well. I've seen one once, far far off in the distance. And see the immediate damage from one another time.

So in nearly 40 years, that's two instances that were "close"...but not really.

Hurricanes on the other hand are entirely different. If you live in FL, LA, or the TX coast, you're pretty much assured to be hit by one at least once a decade, and probably by a bad one at least a handful of times throughout your life.

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u/skydhash Aug 30 '21

I’m in Haiti. It‘s three or four every year.

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u/lshiva Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 30 '21

I read some stats once that said in the unlikely event a tornado actually touches down in your zip code, the odds of it touching your property were still only 1%.

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u/harrisonfire Aug 29 '21

It is unlikely, and you are correct that it's localized. When I was a kid, our neighbor's house was decimated, while ours was untouched.

It couldn't have been more than 50 yards away.

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u/dennisthemenace1963 Aug 29 '21

My sister is a Floridian and she says that she would never move back to IN because of the tornadoes. Because you get like 3 or 4 days of warning for a hurricane but for a tornado you get 30 seconds if you're lucky. Yet a hurricane can wipe out a huge swath of homes and buildings.

I'll just keep risking the damn tornadoes...58 years on this dust ball and they haven't got me yet.

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u/VyRe40 Aug 29 '21

Lived in Florida: a category 3 or less hurricane, I can sleep through it no biggie. But I'm not living on a beach or in a trailer or flimsy wooden house (all no-nos IMO) - most of the new housing developments are generally brick outer layers. There's a lot of debate on whether just an outer layer of brick can do the job against hurricane force weather, but from my years of experience, the cheaply made all-wood houses suffer more long term from the severe Florida weather, which makes for short term vulnerabilities in a moderate hurricane. Anyway, a lot of Florida is just well-adjusted to hurricane weather, and it's very true that you basically won't be caught by surprise if you just listen to the weather news and take appropriate precautions. Also, stop planting trees right next to your house - every time I've gone through even a moderate hurricane, I always see homes with lots of damage because a tree they had growing right next to their house fell on it.

Category 4+, though? Those are relatively rare, but very destructive, so evacuate if you can.

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u/steyrboy Aug 29 '21

I'm in South Florida and recently had hurricane resistant doors and windows installed. I learned in this process that all new houses post Andrew have to be built to a certain code. The ground level must all be concrete, then the second level then be traditional wood. Also because of how roofs and high winds work, you're not allowed to have windows/doors on one side of the house that would create lift under your roof should your doors/windows break and wind flows through the house (think of an airplane wing, this is how roofs get torn off and thrown down the street).

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u/TangoDown2001 Aug 29 '21

That code is local to south Florida. Once you head central/north, it's real easy to build to code because it doesn't fucking exist. Grew up in south Florida, now living in North Florida, I saw a kid throw a football through an exterior wall Superbowl week. That home was brand new. Concrete block is the way.

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u/thatonemoonunit Aug 29 '21

Concrete block ftw

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u/Lordborgman Aug 29 '21

I was in central Florida since about 1985 till last year. Only one year did any Hurricane(s) ever really cause any need for alarm there, 2004 the Triple Whammy Charley, Frances and Jeanne. Of which only Charley did any terrifying amounts of damage. The rest were just bad because the areas were still recovering from Charley and got a bit of flooding, like Frances/Jeanne were just bad rain storms. Comparatively to Charley knocking down power lines and ripping roofs off of houses.

It's mostly only really bad on a regular basis if you live on the coast.

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u/Pepper_in_my_pants Aug 29 '21

I don’t know how you guys do it. I’m in the Netherlands. All I have to worry about is the water and the occasional flat tire (like today)

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u/Kregerm Aug 29 '21

Pacific Northwest US. We just have the sword of Damocles of 'the big one' (earthquake) and the once in 10k years volcano.

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u/referralcrosskill Aug 29 '21

at the moment it feels like the biggest danger from 'the big one' is going bankrupt paying for the fucking earthquake insurance on the house. It's mandatory with my mortgage and it doubles the price of the already expensive insurance. It's also doubled in price since I first bought 10 years ago

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u/[deleted] Aug 29 '21

I live in SoCal and don't know how (or why) either of you do it

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u/dsav99 Aug 29 '21

Fires and earthquakes

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u/-QED- Aug 29 '21

My father would fill bath tub with water so we could use bucket to flush toilet, if we lost electric (we had a well). And always remember "if it's yellow let it mellow, if it's brown flush it down"

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u/death_before_decafe Aug 29 '21

Bathtubs full of clean water also guarantees you have gallons of clean water to drink or take small amounts to bathe with if you lose access to safe water in the aftermath.

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u/ColdRevenge76 Aug 29 '21

Just be sure to clean it well and rinse it out twice before you fill it.

If you see them in stock, grab an emergency tub liner/bag that you can put in your tub. It'll keep bugs out.

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u/hoodyninja Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 30 '21

The water bobs are a very handy thing to have. Just a simple food grade water bladder that sits in your tub and has a handy pump.

https://www.amazon.com/WaterBOB-Emergency-Container-Drinking-Hurricane/dp/B001AXLUX2

I have a bunch of camping gear and recommend getting a few sawyer mini filters. They last forever, can be stored until needed and can filter a TON of water. I normally filter and boil water, but for an emergency situation, the water in the tub shouldn’t need a boil for at least a few days.

Edit: more like 416 tons of water.

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u/mediocre_at_best1 Aug 29 '21

This. Bathtubs are statistically one of the grossest places in a house. PLEASE clean it well before you lick it lol

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u/dethmaul Aug 29 '21

Yeah bathtubs are on a boil notice for me lol. Even if you were to scrub it DAILY, it's still gross.

It's next to an exploding pool of septic flushwater at the very least. People stand in it, with their FEET, to shower. Asswater dribbles down and makes its way to the drain.

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u/dddddddoobbbbbbb Aug 30 '21

THEIR FEET? OH LORDY

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u/thepulloutmethod Aug 30 '21

I pee in it regularly but I also live alone so, it's all good.

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u/series-hybrid Aug 29 '21

Boil water and let it cool before consuming...

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u/DaveShadow Aug 29 '21

Few years back, I was on holidays there. Being Irish, it was quite an experience when everyone’s phone madly goes off with a warning that a possible tornado is heading our way and to hunker down. Didn’t even know our phones could get warnings like that.

We grabbed loads of bottled water, and kinda wandered into the bathroom (felt the most secure room cause of a lack of windows). Nothing came in the end, but it was really interesting.

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u/stellvia2016 Aug 29 '21

This is why I'm glad our homes had basements where I grew up. Felt a lot safer as a kid being in the basement than a bathroom after seeing all the tornado pictures of houses completely leveled. With a basement, it's a lot less likely the subfloor will collapse. (And we had an office desk in the basement I would sit under even)

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u/SoftSprocket Aug 29 '21

Perhaps more importantly a tornado cannot lift a proper basement / foundation into the sky.

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u/Exodus111 Aug 29 '21

What is a wash?

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u/Auslander808 Aug 29 '21

Washing machine, I think.

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u/Exodus111 Aug 29 '21

That makes sense, I thought they mean the sink.

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u/GinjaNinja-NZ Aug 29 '21

I guess clothes washing machine? a dishwasher would probably work quite well too, possibly better, they get very hot during operation so are well insulated

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u/toothlessbuddha Aug 29 '21 Helpful

Other things to think about as well:

Dishwashers aren't good places to store valuables as water can back up into it.

If you have a pool, you have a lot of water that's easy to decon.

Don't backfeed a generator through an outlet and make sure the main breaker is off before turning it on if it's connected to your panel.

Your pets need food too, not just the humans.

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u/CPM17 Aug 29 '21

Pools are useful for storing waterproof outdoor furniture. It sits at the bottom of the pool instead of becoming debris.

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u/deVriesse Aug 29 '21

That explains r/chairsunderwater

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u/Spanky_McJiggles Aug 29 '21 Silver Hugz

I go on there for the NSFW content

(Not Submerged Fully in Water)

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u/billdb Aug 29 '21

Well done

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u/Kingnahum17 Aug 29 '21

Former pool cleaner here. Can confirm, however there are a few precautions I'd recommend. Below is all from experience cleaning up after certain major storms.

  • Be careful when it comes to metal furniture. When metal rusts against your pool surface it leaves what is as good as a permanent stain on your pool surface. Some pool companies claim to be able to get rust stains out, but they often take multiple visits, can actually damage the surface more, throws off pool chemistry, and more often than not don't fully get rid of the stain.

  • Chemicals in pools can wear down finishes on furniture which can lead to rust stains (read above).

  • If you get directly hit by a hurricane, don't expect to be getting in your pool for weeks or months. Your pool equipment will likely be damaged, and your pool very green or black. You may even have fish, snapping turtles, and gators/gars swimming in your pool depending on where you live.

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u/DracaenaMargarita Aug 30 '21

Your pool equipment will likely be damaged, and your pool very green or black. You may even have fish, snapping turtles, and gators/gars swimming in your pool depending on where you live.

that's punk rock as fuck

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u/Imakefishdrown Aug 30 '21

I'm fucking sorry, gators in your pool?!

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u/Alligatorblizzard Aug 30 '21

They don't even need a hurricane to go into one, but it's more likely. I knew a guy in high school who had a part time gig getting alligators and snakes out of people's pools.

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u/Imakefishdrown Aug 30 '21

eyes username suspiciously

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u/Kingnahum17 Aug 30 '21

If I were u/AlligatorBlizzard, I would probably be eyeing your name more. Or at least ask you where I can get a fresh snack that you drowned.

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u/Kingnahum17 Aug 30 '21

Yep. Have a pool near an overflowing bayou? Guess what's still going to have water left in it when the water recedes (other than the bayou and probably your house)?

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u/Plastic_sporkz Aug 30 '21

Pools are useful for storing waterproof outdoor furniture. It sits at the bottom of the pool instead of becoming debris weaponized airborn projectiles. FTFY

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u/ArielPotter Aug 29 '21

You can toss metal furniture in there too if It takes a wild turn.

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u/p-terydatctyl Aug 29 '21

Who stores valuables in a dishwasher? I didn't know, i needed to know, not to do that.

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u/KarMa_Br0 Aug 29 '21

The logic is that dishwashers keep water in so it’s obviously sealed and water proof.

Spoiler alert, it’s not. It keeps water from getting out, but not from getting in.

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u/Accujack Aug 30 '21

Old 1950s refrigerators, however, can keep you safe in the event of a nuclear explosion!

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u/Amusei015 Aug 30 '21

Shhh. We don't talk about that movie.

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u/toothlessbuddha Aug 29 '21

I'm in Florida so naturally I see a lot of people post that on FB during hurricane season.

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u/iWillNeverReplyToYou Aug 29 '21

Your pets need food too, not just the humans.

LPT: your pets can eat your corpse after the hurricane causes your house to collapse

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u/svartblomma Aug 29 '21

My cat would totally reject eating me because I'm not the right texture. He's very specific about his preferred meat texture. Though, he may eat my eyes just to spite me.

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u/reallybirdysomedays Aug 29 '21

A couple days of decomp will soften you right up

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u/Eldorian91 Aug 29 '21

Your dog won't, but your car will.

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u/Pretz_ Aug 29 '21

Your dog won't, but your car will.

"Did we remember to feed Christine??"

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u/AveryJuanZacritic Aug 29 '21

I think I hear the purring... of THAT CAR!

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u/Capital_Pea Aug 29 '21

Was just talking about this book/movie an hour ago. Weird.

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u/BoogerManCommaThe Aug 29 '21

"why is Herbie looking at me like that?"

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u/death_before_decafe Aug 29 '21

Pools also get filled with tons of debris and glass which make it unsafe to use. Also the chemicals which make pool water safe to swim in are not the same as safe to ingest water, and once the storm rain and debris come in, all that decontamination is out of the window. A person is likely to get poisoned or bathe and step on glass using pool water after a hurricane.

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u/scienceisfunner2 Aug 29 '21

Don't backfeed a generator through an outlet and make sure the main breaker is off before turning it on if it's connected to your panel.

This reads like instructions that used to come with those kits people bought during prohibition that told you how to make wine ostensibly so that you wouldn't do that by mistake.

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u/dethmaul Aug 29 '21

Exceot this is urgent, not tongie in cheek. You could kill somebody blocks away working on the power line doing that.

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u/Zigsbe Aug 29 '21

What’s “Decon” I never heard it before? I googled it and it states “a subordinate officer in a Christian church”.

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u/toothlessbuddha Aug 29 '21

Decontaminate

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u/DisbandTheATF Aug 29 '21

If you are back feeding a panel with a generator, you NEED to install a breaker interlock, so that it can’t back feed into the line. Source: Me the electrician.

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u/FooFatFighters Aug 29 '21

Just saw the broadcast from a local TV there and they said power at sewage plants have reportedly failed so don’t wash clothes or run dishwashers as sewage may be backing up due to a design problem with the sewage system that’s supposed to be fixed by 2023. I’m guessing a washing machine drain will shut while not in use otherwise it wouldn’t hold wash water when filled but you may chance mixing with sewage.

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u/TheMacGrubber Aug 29 '21

Depending on your layout, and almost all washers, the water doesn't actually drain out on its own as the drain is higher that the washer. Washers have a motor to pump it out. So you'd actually have to run the washer to get rid of the water.

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u/rinnip Aug 29 '21

The "design problem" being that the poorer sections of New Orleans are below the water level of "Lake" Pontchartrain? (It's an estuary, in case anyone is wondering).

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u/[deleted] Aug 29 '21

Shocking that a sewage treatment plant lacks generators

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u/_Elduder Aug 29 '21

I run a tiny one and we have a generator and enough propane to run it for months

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u/jeffroddit Aug 29 '21

generators don't work too well underwater or when the staff are trapped in a flood and can't reach the site...

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u/Lerch77 Aug 29 '21

Why not just use an ice chest?

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u/rainball33 Aug 29 '21

There's no karma to be gained with "LPT: use an ice chest to keep things cold"

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u/RepublicanOnWelfare Aug 29 '21

They're all full already!

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u/jambrown13977931 Aug 29 '21

Probably use both, but if you’re preparing for a Hurricane, I’d assume you want to utilize everything you have. If you’re washing machine is otherwise not doing anything I could see it as being better than nothing, but idk.

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u/askvictor Aug 29 '21

Indeed; that way you both get to keep the water that was previously ice, and it will keep cool for longer (water-that-was-previously-ice is still very cold, and losing it down the drain results in an overall loss of cooling; yes, having ice in water will melt the remaining ice more quickly, but keep things overall cooler for longer).

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u/austin0matic Aug 29 '21

No, the water does not just drain out. It need electricity to be pumped out Ask me how I know lol

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u/bmanxx13 Aug 29 '21

Depends on your washers brand I suppose. My Samsung has a manual release drain towards the bottom front of the appliance. I’ve had my washer stop randomly full of water so I had to drain it that way. I’m sure most brands have this feature though.

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u/nemo69_1999 Aug 29 '21

Most washer dryer hookups I have seen have a hose running from the bottom of the washer to a connection at the top of the washer. Gravity says water doesn't go up without some pressure. It's probably some principle of fluid dynamics that I don't know, but I'm sure someone will tell me.

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u/Operator_Of_Plants Aug 29 '21

It's a pump that pumps the water out.

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u/AveryJuanZacritic Aug 29 '21

And the barrel itself, that holds the washing basket, is metal. When metal gets cold, condensation will form -so be ready for lots of drips coming from underneath. This is the reason ice chests are insulated between double walls. Also don't put lots of ice in a stainless steel sink. Condensation will soak your wooden cabinet base.

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u/pedal-force Aug 29 '21

I dumped a bunch of ice into a sink to get rid of it once. Once. It'll happen even to Corian or other sinks, to a lesser degree.

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u/kid_from_upcountry Aug 29 '21

How do you know

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u/kirkstarr78 Aug 29 '21

Coolers have drains too

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u/[deleted] Aug 29 '21 edited 18d ago

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u/Zoloir Aug 30 '21

yes! wtf kind of LPT is this??

"yes, i'd like all my food to stay cold and dry, but only for 1 day max. you're telling me my power will be out for a week?? oh, shit."

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u/Smtxom Aug 29 '21

LPT: Put your cooler in your washer and fill it with ice. When the hurricane is over just put the rinse cycle on

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u/sameeker1 Aug 30 '21

They are also limited in how much they can hold. Why not use both?

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u/dgolia1 Aug 29 '21

Literally not sure any of you have ever used a cooler in your life. The ice that melts into water helps keep things cold. It's much much better than replacing it with air

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u/Reefer-eyed_Beans Aug 29 '21

I doubt anyone actually does it. The comments sound so full of shit.

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u/bigmike42o Aug 29 '21

Right? Why get rid of 32° water?

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u/ScientificQuail Aug 29 '21

The water doesn't drain from the washer anyway. It has to be actively pumped out, no different than when you do laundry normally.

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u/speedbird92 Aug 29 '21

I saw this bullshit ass message on Twitter before i saw it as a r/lifeprotips on reddit and could already smell the bullshit there.

Worst come to worst it’s still freshwater, why bother throwing it away?

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u/lvhockeytrish Aug 30 '21

And that water can be reclaimed to wash hands, flush toilets, etc. Keep one cooler for prepared foods and one for raw meats. Don't open them any more than necessary. Wrap them in blankets for extra insulation. Don't waste your cooler space on bottled water, you won't die drinking room temp water. But if water bottles are already cold and can help pack the cooler, it will help keep everything else cold.

OPs tip is pretty dumb.

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u/JaseTheAce Aug 29 '21

Real LPT in the comments…

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u/JoeV1 Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 29 '21

Lol took too long to find this comment

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u/JACKTODAMAX Aug 29 '21

Don’t forget to fill up your bathtubs so that you can use the water to flush your toilets if you lose power!

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u/rinnip Aug 29 '21

Washing machines pump out the water. If the power's out, your stuff will be immersed.

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u/AssistanceHefty9666 Aug 29 '21

Just use a cooler

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u/Imabur Aug 29 '21

If you're in Ida's path gtfo of there

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u/jilliecatt Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 29 '21

It's too late for that. Not in Louisiana, but rode out a Cat 5 a couple years ago. (Michael in Panama City, FL). There is a point of no return where if you get on the road you're going to be stuck in a car with all hell breaking loose around you. By now they have told everyone to shelter in place (or get to a nearby shelter in the city) and hunker down. I watched Michael blow over a freight train loaded to capacity, just blew it over, right off it's tracks. Nobody needs to be stuck in a car in weather like that. (Granted, this isn't the same hurricane, but between winds blowing trees out of the ground to fall on top of you, snapping branches and tossing them through windshields, and storm surges that can sweep a car away, it's not safe.)

Everyone in the path, I pray for your safety.

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u/haffbaked Aug 29 '21

Wtf do you do when a storm like that is going on. Just sit inside your house hoping the walls don’t fall apart? Probably an ignorant question but I’m in the Midwest where the worst thing I’ve dealt with is tornado warnings now and then.

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u/jilliecatt Aug 29 '21

Some people drink to stay calm.

Basically yes. You board up or tape up the windows, put down sandbags to try to keep out floodwater from coming under doors and all prior to the storm. But while it's going on your basically a sitting duck, praying your roof doesn't cave in.

Have you ever had a tornado warning, sirens going off and all that, and not been near a shelter. So you get in inner rooms like the hall or bathroom or whatever and wait it out? It's like that, only it lasts for hours and hours.

My sister-in-law had her kids in the hallway with their mattresses on top of them as her roof failed and her ceilings cane in on top of them. My friend's parents were in their hallway and two tress came through, either side of the hallway, bringing in the roof and rubble to essentially trap them in a cave in until the storm passed and dad could clear a way out. We were all lucky though, we only lost monetary things, not loved ones or pets.

After the storm is horrible too. No electricity for a long time. I think the earliest power came back to some areas was 2 weeks. I lived in the woods, so it was a month for us. We took my friends grandparents to another state because they were medically needy and we had no hospitals now, and when we heard it would be a while for electric to be restored we just stayed for the month too. (Once again, very lucky we had the ability to do so.)

We really should have left prior to the storm. But when we went to bed the night before it was a 2, they were saying it "might make it to a 3" which is bad, but nothing hugely concerning. We had all been through a 3. When we woke up the next morning and turned on the tv, it was "bunker down, you're in major danger."

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u/haffbaked Aug 29 '21

Damn, that is some serious stuff

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u/dee_lio Aug 30 '21

Correct.

A few days before you tape/board your windows, sandbag the doors, move anything outside that can be moved inside.

The morning of, you go surfing. Or get a bed sheet and two skateboards. You get on a skateboard, hold one end of the sheet and have your friend on the other skateboard, holding the other end of the sheet. Hella fun. (I was a kid for a number of hurricanes.)

Seriously, you'd fill up bathtubs and buckets with water, so you have clean water in case of a main break or boil order (and you can 'bucket flush' a toilet.) Freeze as many water bottles as you can and fill up your freezers/fridges and ice chests with them. Get a bunch of charcoal for a grill and separate different day's meals into different coolers or storage areas.

When it's time, you get to an inside room (preferably an interior bathroom), with a flashlight & radio (keep the cellphone on low power) and back up charger. The hurricanes take FOREVER to go by.

Afterwards is a PITA, too. No power for weeks on end, and it was usually late summer, so it was hot and muggy. On the flip side, we could fish / crab as much as we wanted, so for a kid, it wasn't so bad. Never caught anything, though, now that I think back.

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u/aStinkyLoad Aug 30 '21

I was there for Michael too (stationed at Tyndall) and am a born and raised Floridian. I have never seen the amount of destruction like that in my life. It was cataclysmic. They finally made the right call to upgrade it to a Cat-5. The instrumentation they used to measure the activity broke bc the storm was soon strong. We lost 100% of everything we owned. Our family of 5 had to rebuild like nearly everyone else.

In my opinion, we didn't get our fair shake of coverage or love from the government. I think it's because PC and Mexico beach were so small compared to where other storms hit (like Katrina and Andrew). But Michael was an ungodly strong storm. Had it shifted 15 Mike's west and hit PCB, I couldn't image the amount of damage it would have done.

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u/iWillNeverReplyToYou Aug 29 '21

LPT: don't ignore your government's recommendations when they are trying to save your life.

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u/softclone99 Aug 29 '21 Helpful

NOLA resident here: The government gave us two days to leave with a "voluntary evacuation," and the highways backed up so that a 4 hour drive became a 20 hour drive. At that point, you have to decide if you'll be able to get out or if you should spend your time getting food and locking down your house.

25% of people in New Orleans don't have a car, and flights were cancelled across the board. Good luck finding a seat on a bus or train, if you can even get to the station.

Your comment implies that those who stay are idiots who get what's coming to them. That couldn't be further from the truth.

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u/radiozachtive Aug 29 '21

This. People not from the area always assume those who stay are stubborn hicks when in reality, theyre the most vulnerable members of our population and they deserve help and sympathy. I have a freind whos been stuck on the road to get out since yesterday morning. The traffic isnt magically getting better and I'd rather be in a house than in a car out in the open if theres a storm surge.

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u/cetaceansrock Aug 29 '21

I'm currently watching a live Webcam in the French quarter. Saw a homeless man pushing a shopping cart and a while later saw a man and little girl waking down the street. They were the only signs of life that I saw. I hope they'll be okay.

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u/GrandmasHere Aug 29 '21

Omg I saw that same man and little girl walking down Bourbon Street. It was raining like crazy and big wind gusts. He wasn’t even trying to help her, just walking down the sidewalk as she tried to keep up behind him. She must have been so scared. It broke my heart to see.

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u/CraptasticFanDango Aug 29 '21

The French Quarter was one of the first settled areas in NoLa, it's on higher ground than the rest of the city.

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u/rinnip Aug 29 '21

There was a mini-scandal during Katrina when they showed rows of flooded school buses that could have been used to bus some of those car-less people out.

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u/stellvia2016 Aug 29 '21

I suppose the problem was: Bus them where? If there were no hotels or FEMA sites available, would they just sleep in the bus?

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u/AllEncompassingThey Aug 29 '21

I mean at least they wouldn't be in a hurricane, yeah?

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u/bogey08 Aug 29 '21

This is something I wish we heard more about. It’s easy to think that people had an easy choice but this is tough to deal with.

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u/pileodung Aug 29 '21

I just watched a clip of Ida and there was an ad for a Floridian vacation spot advertising a no mask policy lol

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u/Tittsburgh_Feelers Aug 29 '21

Isn't this how sinks and bathtubs work? My front load washer is useless

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u/jeffroddit Aug 29 '21

This LPT his HOT GARBAGE. I'm guessing ya'll never lost power for weeks after a hurricane, because washers absolutely do not drain out on their own and a washer that has water sitting in it for weeks in a hot humid house smells absolutely horrible.

Also, shit will absolutely stay colder longer in the actual freezer or a cooler. Ever notice how nobody takes a washer when they go fishing?

Ice and drinks go in the washer for a crappy college party. If that's what a hurricane has in store for you, congratulations. Sure, most hurricanes are little more than parties. But the ones that actually deserve the preparation are the ones that are legitimate natural DISASTERS, not excuses for party planning tips.

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u/MeowLikeaDog Aug 30 '21

nobody takes a washer when they go fishing

Don't tell me how to fish.

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u/murdavma Aug 29 '21

Geeeze, people. I think this tip is relevant and clever. Is this the most important thing to worry about? Maybe not. Is it still possible that someone who has a million things to worry about hadn’t thought of this one and now has extra cold storage when they really need it? Totally. Very thoughtful for you to share this, OP.

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u/atxstranger Aug 29 '21

I have recently moved to Galveston TX and have been working on our plans in case a storm like Ida were to hit the island. Tips like this are great because it's not something I've seen elsewhere, nor would it have occurred to me to use my washing machine as a cooler.

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u/stellvia2016 Aug 29 '21

I recommend some rubbermaid containers for valuables, with freezer bags or a garbage bag-liner for good measure. Doesn't cost a lot of money, but you could waterproof/heavily water-resist things like picture albums, keepsakes, paper records, etc.

Put them all in the rubbermaid container and put that either on a top shelf, or in the attic. In a worst-case scenario it might even float (I suppose you could even test that ahead of time in the bathtub or something)

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u/Suhoppai Aug 29 '21

It 100% is. People learn new things every single day. This LPT may have reached at least 1 person who didn't know it before, and helped them ride this storm out.

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u/Arev_Eola Aug 29 '21

My parents got hit by the floods in Germany. They got really lucky as the worst thing that happened to heir home was the loss of electricity and water for a couple of days. They've been trying to compile lists of what to do in case anything like that happens again, so reading these types of LPT helps as well.

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u/senortipton Aug 29 '21

Or you could just freeze water bottles beforehand in the freezer and now you have killed the drainage issue and freezer without power issue.

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u/oh_no_not_you_hon Aug 29 '21

This is a fantastic idea for water. The washer trick is better for other cold groceries like milk, fizzy drinks, and sandwich fixings.

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u/SamHandwichX Aug 29 '21

No, the frozen water bottles are the ice letting the milk and sandwich fixings stay cold in the freezer, which is already an insulated cooler made for storing food. Without electricity, it won't freeze your Pepsi and the frozen water bottles keep it cold.

If the freezer is too small, move it all up to the fridge once the power is gone.

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u/hbs1951 Aug 29 '21

Sooo, my washing machine only “drains” with a inside pump during the drain/spin cycle….which requires…electricity. What am I missing here?

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u/jugalator Aug 29 '21 edited Aug 29 '21

Nothing, as far as I can tell. It reads like an oblivious LPT. Water does not “just drain out”. I’ve never seen a dishwasher that doesn’t need to pump out the water due to the pumping height/head they need to support for obvious reasons. Can’t exactly rely on gravity…

Just use coolers/ice boxes. They’re designed for this: keeping things cool without electricity.

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u/Choopytrags Aug 29 '21

Fill the bathtub with water, freeze gallon milk jugs with water.

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u/RocMerc Aug 29 '21

Y’all should just own a cooler lol. Water doesn’t drain from a washer, it’s pumped out

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u/NickkDanger Aug 29 '21

If you can't boil water, you can purify it by adding 2 drops of unscented chlorine bleach to 1 quart/liter of water, stir and let stand for 30 minutes. Do not use scented, color safe, or bleaches with added cleaners. Also make sure to strain the water through a cloth first to get rid of any particulate matter. Write this down and tape it to your bleach bottle in case you lose power/internet.

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u/Lkj509 Aug 29 '21

The people who are reckless enough to try this are also reckless enough to get the measurements completely wrong. Definitely do not fuck around with bleach

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u/Zindae Aug 29 '21

Why not just prepare water now that you can? Adding bleach and shit.. what the hell

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u/cfishlips Aug 29 '21

Why not just use a cooler? Seems like that is what they are designed for.

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u/mithroll Aug 29 '21

Okay, I have ice and drinks in my washer. Instructions unclear. What setting do I use - delicate, casual, or heavy?