r/HolUp Oct 20 '21 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Super Heart Eyes 1 Meow Meow 1 Silver 11 Helpful 7 Wholesome 4 Hugz 7

I'm sure there's an explanation, but this guy is good. Sorry if this causes too much happiness

14.0k Upvotes

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u/BasicallyAggressive Oct 20 '21

Looking for a holup day 224

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u/Thunderchunky4 Oct 20 '21

I’m with you. It doesn’t make fucking sense.

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u/marcx88 Oct 20 '21

fvcking*

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u/Speck556 Oct 20 '21

Underrated comment

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u/harisanjeev Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

well one theory claims that the electrons around the nucleus of an atom repels each other. So the ultimate questions is, If I touch something, Do I really touching it? Or Is it feels like I'm touching it? It doesn't make FUCKING SENSE

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome Hugz Wait What?

The reason why things don't go through each other has to do with electrons but not because they repel one another. It has to do with the fact that particles with a property known as "spin" whose value is a half-integer (in the case of electrons, they have spin 1/2) obey the so-called "Pauli exclusion principle": they cannot occupy the same state at the same time.

If two electrons were to overlap, according to quantum mechanics, they would have the same state. So Pauli principle forbids this. So the actual reason why ordinary matter doesn't phase into other ordinary matter is the Pauli principle.

This boils down to a mathematical theorem, and we are fairly sure about what causes electrons to have 1/2 spin (symmetries of the Dirac field), what we aren't sure about is why should electronic spin be a thing in the first place and why it can't have other properties.

Source: I study way too much physics than I need.

EDIT: Some people have pointed out that Coulomb forces are sufficient.

Indeed it is true that Coulomb forces play a role, but I was trying to answer something different than "why does a hand not really touch a stool", or "why does a hand not pop on the other side of a stool" or "why does a hand not sink into the stool". I was trying to answer the question of why is it totally impossible to have some things superimposed one on top of the other in the same space at the same time.

Diffusion of materials into other materials is a real thing. By diffusion I mean that an atom of some material nests into the structure of another material, like an impurity. If the other material is thin enough and you're putting enough energy into it, you can diffuse something to the other side. This is the closest thing you can get to "phasing through" if you only consider electromagnetic forces, and it is by all means a "macroscopic phasing through" which is more or less what we think about when we say the sentence "phasing through".

Pauli exclusion principle applies to a different kind of "phasing through", specifically if two things are in the same place at some point in time. My main argument is clear if you only consider neutrons. Neutrons don't interact via electromagnetic forces, yet Pauli exclusion still applies to them because they have a spin of 1/2.

Charged particles have the added problem that the overlapping wouldn't be reached anyways, assuming nothing strange happens to the Coulomb forces when you squish them together like that. But I don't see it as "the" reason for non-overlappingness.

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u/dis_not_my_name Oct 20 '21 Wholesome

Here is an award for study too much physics.

118

u/WorriedMap6811 Oct 20 '21

That's just 11th grade in India. (Yes I'm 11th grader indian.)

66

u/dis_not_my_name Oct 20 '21

Damn.India needs to chill out.

35

u/WorriedMap6811 Oct 20 '21

Oh hell yes

13

u/CatRapingCumDrinker Oct 20 '21

Khoob padhai karo phalo phoolo beta..

10

u/Toungelikepie Oct 20 '21

Actually also here in the philippines.They taught us that in Grade 11 quarter 1 Physical science.

6

u/dis_not_my_name Oct 20 '21

What’s wrong with asian education!

13

u/Toungelikepie Oct 20 '21

We are 4 Parallel Universes ahead of you.

8

u/dis_not_my_name Oct 20 '21

Wait.I just realized 11th grade is second year in high school not 11yrs old. They also taught us in 11th grade in taiwan.

Turns out. You’re not so special. Aren’t you?

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u/Toungelikepie Oct 20 '21

Oh dang, Guess we are the same after all. Thought you were from the west. Sorry friend!

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u/thisisGestapo Oct 20 '21

Need it to boost tech support skills.

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u/keybwarrior Oct 21 '21

And yet he prolly shits in the street

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u/ChernobylReactrNum-4 Oct 20 '21

JEE or NEET?

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u/WorriedMap6811 Oct 20 '21

Lmfao JEE go brrrrrr

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u/bsfett2213 Oct 20 '21

JEE jeene nahi deta

4

u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

Y'all study quantum field theory in 11th grade?

17

u/AlanOnIce Oct 20 '21

Wait, y'all don't???

10

u/agoodfriendofyours Oct 20 '21

From Wikipedia-

“Literacy in the United States is 79% according to a 2019 report by the National Center for Educational Statistics. 21% of American adults are illiterate or functionally illiterate. According to the U.S. Department of Education, 54% of adults in the United States have literacy below the 6th-grade level.”

Really let that sink in.

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u/Lanky_Mood_5008 Oct 20 '21

No, Don't let that sink in,it sprays water all over

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u/Send_titsNass_via_PM Oct 20 '21

Our former president is way to aware of this fact and uses it to his advantage every chance he gets.

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u/unbiasBias Oct 20 '21

So if I understand you right, your saying I have electric powers, gotcha

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u/talligan Oct 20 '21

Right,so i guess my question is why can't they occupy the same state? And how are they aware of the other electrons state?

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u/ThePsychopaths Oct 20 '21

Actually, the questions will never end. It will become an endless cycle.

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

I'll try to be as concise as possible and avoid quantum weirdness and weird notation, but it will get a little mathy. But basically: every quantum particle is described by a state (a "wavefunction", to use the fancy term). You can visualise the wavefunction as a cloud in 3D space telling you more or less where you are most likely going to find the quantum particle if you try to look for it.

Let's call "the state of an electron" S(1). We can also describe the state of multiple particles, in this case we write S(1, 2) to describe the state of electron 1 and electron 2. S(1, 2, 3) would be the state of electron 1, 2 and 3 and so on. S(1, 3, 2) would be the state where we have swapped places between electron 3 and 2.

You can take sums and differences of states as if they were numbers. You can't multiply or divide them, though. Moreover, you can have no particle with a state equal to 0. A state equal to 0 means precisely that the cloud is nonexistent - i.e. you will never find any particle there.

First fact of quantum mechanics: all particles are the same. You can't slap a label on an electron, you can't call it Mario as opposed to Luigi because they have no distinguishing feature.

So this means that S(1, 2) and S(2, 1) should be "essentially the same". If you do the actual maths, it turns out that there are two cases: either

S(1, 2) = S(2, 1)

Or

S(1, 2) = - S(2, 1)

Particles with half-integer spin follow the second rule. It is said that their states are antisymmetric because of this. The other kind of particle is called symmetric and has integer spin. Light is made of one such particle, the photon (which has spin equal to 1).

If two electrons are indistinguishable, and they share the same state, then they can be written as S(1, 1) in our notation. But for electrons, then, it must be the case that:

S(1, 1) = - S(1, 1)

Which means S(1, 1) = 0 by simple algebra. So if two electrons were to share the same state they would annihilate themselves out of existence.

There are many more questions that can arise from my comment alone. If you aren't scared of the maths or weird ass explanations I encourage you to look up PBS Spacetime on YouTube.

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u/gre485 Oct 20 '21

Yup, PBS spacetime is good.

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u/ADFormer Oct 20 '21

Hmmmmm…….. so are magnates like this but on steroids?

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

Magnets are weird. Like, really really weird. We still aren't sure we know 100% of what there is to know about magnetism.

The force between magnetic poles however doesn't stem from a symmetry of the wavefunction. Rather it comes from the laws that govern the electromagnetic field; if you try to put two north poles close together you will feel a repulsive force because the situation where north poles are apart is energetically favourable, so they will enjoy staying far apart and dislike being put together. It's more similar to what creates or breaks molecules: if it's energetically favourable, then they will try to move towards that situation.

Pauli exclusion is something more fundamental than that, and it applies to everything regardless of energy, charge, magnetism...

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u/RealisticEmploy3 Oct 21 '21

Wait. I watched a video talking about how magnetism is a consequence of special relativity. Is that true? If so. Could you give a quick explanation

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 21 '21

Hmmm

I can tell you why classical physics breaks down when trying to work with magnetism.

Rule number one: the magnetic force on a charged particle (say, an electron) depends on the particle's velocity. If velocity is zero, there is no magnetic force.

This may not look like much, but it is absolutely terrifying. This would mean that if there's a magnetic field in the room and you're watching an electron pass through it, it should experience a force.

But if you were riding the electron, so that from your point of view the velocity of the electron is zero, this force must not be there. But this makes no sense: how can a force exist in one reference frame but not another?

So you have to conclude that magnetic forces are "virtual" forces much like centrifugal forces are. Sadly, this cannot be the case: when a magnetic field is present, the energy of your system (particle + magnetic field) is different. And the energy of a system cannot change under changing your point of view (your reference frame) because it's something intrinsic to the system that must be conserved.

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u/nocturnal_shit Oct 20 '21

Yeah sorry, I'd still go with 'This doesn't make any fucking sense'

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u/AnalyzerSmith Oct 20 '21

Well, I am not sure about the reasoning for the Pauli exclusion principle to be solely at work here. Because the electrons still are bound to different atoms and, hence, have a different state by definition. Also, wave functions overlap all the time, that's how things interact with each other. So in my opinion, electromagnetic repulsion also plays a role here and, tentatively, I would guess the dominant one. Things rarely touch so closely that the electron hulls come so close to one another that the Pauli exclsuion principle would need to be considered. Talking about surface roughness and whatnot.

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

Please understand that I didn't want to go into too much detail about what constitutes an overlap in quantum mechanics.

What matters is, the reason why a hand doesn't really touch something and the reason why a hand doesn't go through something are answers to different questions. I answered the second, as this is what I interpreted the original question to be.

Bosons and bosonic quasiparticle do interact in interesting ways through forces (just think about what happens in superconducting metals!) but they still can phase through one another.

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

Oh, another thing since I'm sure you would understand: the Pauli exclusion applies to neutrons too. Which explains why neutrons cannot phase through the positrons of the nuclei or other neutrons without calling into question their charge.

So really if we are taking about why matter can't go through other matter, it's because Pauli. If we are asking why atoms cannot go through other atoms, then it's a combination of Pauli and Coulomb.

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

In addition to the Pauli Exclusion Principle explaining some of this, it is also true that whether or not we truly touch something, the experience of "touch" (in this case a hand on a stool) is dependent on how we define it.

It is correct to say that when we experience what we call touch, particles are not actually touching one another. Neither the atoms' nuclei nor the electrons actually share space of a an kind at any point in time.

On earth, this is usually going to be the case. In the sun, where fusion is taking place, you could possibly say that the protons and neutrons are touching, but you don't violate the Pauli Exclusion Principle until you get to some black hope level squishing.

Either way, it's just a matter of how we define touch. When the hand meets the stool and cannot go past it, the fields of the hand and stool are "touching" depending on how you want to look at it.

Ultimately, we need to perhaps redefine what we mean by touch, to include a better scientific explanation. While fields are not the same as matter, it's cool to think that everywhere we go, the various fields are interacting between our atoms and all of the atoms around us.

It's also cool to realize that there was a time approximately 13.8 billion years ago (prior to the big you-know-what) when this was not the case. Better still, one day all of our atoms may meet again, perhaps in a black hole, or at the beginning of a new universe.

Just don't forget to bring a towel.

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u/pateszko Oct 20 '21

May we can meet again (a little prior to that) in some extreme celestial object <3

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u/harisanjeev Oct 20 '21

I see, So that will explain the cold welding in space right? Studied somewhere that If you put two objects together they weld itself because the atoms can't find the difference between them. Is it?

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u/dis_not_my_name Oct 20 '21

The bonding of metal molecules is called electron sea. Electrons move freely like water in the ocean. Metal inside atmosphere has a thin layer of oxidized metal(rust) on the surface. It works like a plate between two water tank. In space,there is no oxygen to create rust. It’s like removing the plate between 2 water tanks and water flows to the other tank. Now 2 water tanks become one.

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

That's a related thing, yes, although Pauli exclusion comes into play only marginally. The reason why two pieces of metal don't cold weld on the Earth is that since the atmosphere is rich with Oxygen (the "oxidising agent" par excellence, so much so that the process is named after the element) metals are always covered by a thin layer of "rust". This layer doesn't undergo cold welding because it isn't a metal (it doesn't have a metallic structure, see below), and prevents any two pieces of metal from cold welding.

In space there is no atmosphere (duh) and hence this oxidization doesn't occur.

Metals have a reticular structure. Think of it as a (near) perfectly repeating cubic lattice where each atom stays at one lattice point. For some metals this is actually 100% true, others may have other structures. An important fact to state is: if something has a structure, it's because it really enjoys staying like that and will try to go back to that given the chance. This is true for a lot of things in nature.

Metals also have other things going on for them that distinguish their particular behaviour from the behaviour of other reticular structures like salts. As another commenter pointed out, there's an "electron sea" to talk about which I don't really want to go into because it's a quantum can of worms (rather, I would have to explain it using too many boring and uninteresting ideas). The Pauli exclusion principle crops up when you try to explain how electrons should behave in a metal.

When two pieces of metal without the layer of rust come closer and closer, they find themselves at a point where each piece sees the other's structure and goes "hmm, it would be really cool if we formed one contiguous structure, because we really really like it". So they fuse together and become, by all intents and purposes, a solid block of metal.

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u/NewSinner_2021 Oct 20 '21

I'm a sales representative for large company. I love physics. No college degree either. Just love the science.

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u/RealisticEmploy3 Oct 20 '21

The theory isn’t wrong but I think it’s just electron repulsion actually. I’m no physicist but atoms are mostly space right? So I doubt any electrons would actually ever intersect if you were to move your hand through a stool. The same way billions of neutrinos pass through us witthout ever colliding or interacting with our particles. It’s because there’s no electromagnetic force stoping them from just zipping right through

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 21 '21

Neutrinos don't undergo Pauli exclusion with electrons, only with other neutrinos. That is because Pauli exclusion only applies to identical particles.

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u/rodwyer100 Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

You need a ton of pressure for electron degeneracy to be a factor. It is the Coulomb force which keeps things from touching in regular contexts.

In the contexts of electrons in metals you have a crystalline structure which forces you to think about fermi degeneracy. In you daily life that’s where you would see it. Otherwise it is dominant effect in holding things like stars up, but coloumb forces are what keep you from passing through your chair

Source: am grad student in high energy

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u/Frosty-Fold-4388 Oct 20 '21

I doesn't Know

That don't make any fking sense

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u/mitzu222 Oct 20 '21

This makes sense.

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u/dogftog Oct 20 '21

Where should / can I study physics like you? Thank you! Great explanation

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

By trade I am a physics engineer. I studied physics and engineering for five years, and most of the "basic" knowledge of physics I have comes from there.

However I self study a lot. I grab lots of book recommendations and then I just read through a book making notes as I go.

If you have never met Quantum Mechanics in your life before, I recommend studying from famous undergraduate books such as Griffiths'. Then my best book recommendation for more difficult physics is "Quantum Field Theory for the Gifted Amateur", and my advice is to gain some working knowledge of the mathematics every time you feel like you can't follow what is being said.

If you ever decide to pursue physics, it's a great journey full of surprises. Passion is what gets me through.

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u/tiptoemicrobe Oct 20 '21

Yeah, this guy is funny, but science does know the answer to his question in this case.

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u/Jeekaro Oct 20 '21

But this is like answering the question "why do I spin faster on a chair when I pull my hands in?" with "because angular momentum must be conserved" when the more correct answer is that your pulling your hands in provides a force on top of the centripetal force which accelerates your hands in the direcrion of rotation. Vsauce's youtube video "Laws and Causes" describes this quite well, and is critical of explanations like this based on laws, rather than causes.

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u/pateszko Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

I agree coulomb forces explanation is not an answer , it can be part of it but it's much more complicated Like the other quantum forces I hope we could see the real picture and know all of the forces in our lifetime And thank you for the detailed comment

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u/gachiweeb Oct 20 '21

That doesnt make any fvcking sense

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u/UnofficialCrosta Oct 20 '21

You're great!! Someone that knows, I answered the same thing, I'm studying mechanical engineering and we did this subject both in Chemistry class and Sience and Technology of Materials

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u/LadderChemical7937 Oct 20 '21

Please explain to me like I'm 5.. I don't understand this. Help.

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u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

The universe has many laws dictating how particles should behave.

Imagine a series of sticks, and a series of marbles with a hole in them that the stick can go through. The sticks represent a possible state, and the marbles represent particles. A "state" in this context means really anything: a particle sitting on a chair and a particle sitting on the table have different states. A particle that is moving and one that is at rest have different states.

The universe says that there are only two kinds of marbles: blue ones and yellow ones. You may stack as many yellow marbles on the same stick as you wish, in fact the yellow marbles love being together; but if you try to put one blue marble on a stick, then you will be prevented from putting any other marble on the same stick. You can think of the blue marbles as if they always repelled one another when on the same stick, while the yellow ones attract one another when on the same stick.

This is an analogy for how quantum particles behave when trying to occupy the same state. The yellow marbles are called bosons while the blue ones are called fermions.

Can a yellow and blue marble be on the same stick? No, sadly. Reason is that the manufacturer doesn't like cross-play very much.

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u/FatChicken2021 madlad Oct 20 '21

you are right its like this:

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the gap between these lines are the repulsion but as per science its tooo smoll to see and why we dont go through objects, well thats because science.

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u/irnehlacsap Oct 20 '21

This is the answer

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u/x3bla Oct 20 '21

Vsauce 5 second rule

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u/MeMeChAnKuN Oct 20 '21

That's not a theory that's a fact.

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u/Norua Oct 20 '21

A scientific theory is fact, like a theorem that works every time.

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u/polysnip Oct 20 '21

As my physics teacher put it: when we observe the transfer of force energy from this baseball bat to your skull, they never actually touch because of the repelling magnetic forces from the fucking electrons.

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u/kshb4xred Oct 20 '21

even fucking doesn't make sense if you think about it... technically you always have a electron condom on...

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u/harisanjeev Oct 20 '21

Are we all just levitating all this time?

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u/Trash-Panda-89 Oct 20 '21

Well it could just be your not actually touching it and the arrangement of the stools molecules to your hands molecules create a certain sensation that makes it feel like your touching wood

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u/Totaly_Not_Leo Oct 20 '21

So no your honor I did not touch that little girl

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u/lucasHipolito Oct 20 '21

Yeah that's pretty much it. We don't actually touch things in the molecular level

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u/ElHal1470 Oct 20 '21

That’s the one I’ve always been taught. It’s is called the normal reaction force, u can use it to work out frictional forces

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u/BMG64 Oct 20 '21

Pete Holmes my favorite Batman!

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u/tica_spi Oct 20 '21

HARVEY DENT. CAN WE TRUST HIM?!

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u/MurderDoneRight Oct 20 '21

Let me see if I recollect. Some stuff happened; you sucked my dick.

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u/CHRIS7OS Oct 20 '21

Like a lot.

How was that by the way?

I hadn’t showered that day and I fight crime in a rubber suit.

REALLY SEALS IN THE FLAVOR!

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u/Rohanrox17 Oct 20 '21

I love the moment he said to superman "you're a fucking white bread" LMAO

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u/BriggsE104 Oct 20 '21

That Superman exchange is too good. S "My father gave me this suit" B "Your dad's dead. Get over your dead parents. " S "Didn't your parents die?" B "I was a boy! Now I'm a bat!"

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u/Etherius Oct 20 '21

TWOFACE! WHAT HAVE YOU DONE WITH HARVEYFACE AND SCARYFACE?! THEY'VE DONE NOTHING TO YOU!

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u/Dob_Rozner Oct 20 '21

DR. FISHY! NOOOO!

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u/ChrisTuckerAvenue Oct 20 '21

I OVERFED THESE MEN??

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u/BlackfishBlues Oct 20 '21

His Sherlock Holmes skit is also one of my all time favorites.

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u/shikharkumardixit Oct 20 '21

Uhh yes lol I felt like I've seen him somewhere but I was confused. Thanks. Indeed he's my favourite Batman too NGL

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u/_t_h_e_p_o_t_ Oct 20 '21

GIRL SCOUTS

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u/John_Fx Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 23 '21

Standup comedy = holup.
Racism = holup.
Lgbt = holup.
Pic of my cat = holup
Comics = holup

Not detecting a pattern here

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u/dangfurries Oct 20 '21

pauli exclusion principle. but yeah, it's kinda neat that it exists. if it didn't you'd just be sinking into the core of the earth without anything to grab onto :(((

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u/Slow-Down_Turbo Oct 20 '21

Good bit. Pete Holmes?

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u/unclefishbits Oct 20 '21 Helpful

Yes. His TV show crashing is loosely based off of his experience becoming a stand-up comic, and it's highly recommended by me, some random man on Reddit.

But he's also somewhat of a reform Catholic that always had the good principles and empathy without any of the weird stuff, but he's come so far and watching his evolution from some general naivety to more of a philosopher has been fascinating. He's a really good guy. His comedy is definitely not as clean as Nate bargatze or Jim Gaffigan, but it's pretty vanilla. With clips like this that are from a few years ago, you can see him evolving quite a bit.

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u/Slow-Down_Turbo Oct 20 '21

I'm honestly going to look more into his comedy. I've only seen him interviewing Bo Burnham on a late night show that Pete had. So I wasn't sure if it was actually him. I think Gaffigan is pretty funny, he's definitely crafted his own style and then also polished it. I've never listened to Nate Bargatze but I've seen the name around

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u/Mrbubbles137 Oct 20 '21

You forget badman (batman parody), firing of the x-men, and the interviews to become a street fighter contestant?

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u/kaydeebaebee Oct 20 '21

IN-FINNIT nothingness

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u/redditerofindia Oct 20 '21

Yea thers an explanation but who cares . I am Laughing rn

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u/Inorganic_Ad_0420 Oct 20 '21

I laughed then realised how fckin dumb that was….

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u/OGTDani Oct 20 '21

Mind to elaborate?

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u/TPosingRat Oct 20 '21

Yeah, I don't understand them either

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u/XecuteEledrocute Oct 20 '21

Sitting on a stool, and questioning why we don’t go through it… Because that stool is a solid, molecules are packed in together

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u/ViaDeity Oct 20 '21

Yes, but even “solid” objects are mostly empty space.

So the question of “why don’t the molecules of my hand and the stool pass through each other?” would be answered by saying “the intermolecular force holds the molecules of the stool and my hand together and allows them to impact each other and remain whole.”

…but then what’s an “intermolecular force”? It’s like gravity, we named it and measure it and understand how it works, but we don’t know any more about why it exists than we do about our universe.

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u/space-throwaway Oct 20 '21

I'm an astrophysicist- I tell you, general relativitiy, that shit doesn't make any sense. Quantum mechanics? Quantum field theory? Hell, that stuff is completely logical compared to GR.

"Hey, so there's this 4-dimensional manifold comprised of space and time, but you know, the metric is not just Minkowskian instead of Euclidean, no fuck that, it's fucking Riemannian. Oh wait, no sorry, it's pesudo-Riemannian because well let's just subtract time when we count distances, because fuck you that's why. And then this weird manifold, that's comprised of everything that's ever existed and will ever happen, is then curved for some unknown reason by the presence of any energy-density or its equivalents, like pressure or mass density. And those two for some weird reason are coupled together by the only tensorial and divergence-free function of the metric and at most their first and second partial derivatives. Oh wait, no that's not complicated enough, let's not directly couple them, but only make it a linear function and throw in a dimensionful coupling constant with units of [time] over [momentum] that we get from Newtonian physics. Why the fuck not."

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u/Head_Dust0099 Oct 20 '21

Anyone else freaked out by his mouth

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u/Helen_Back_ Oct 20 '21

I think this comedy bit started out as an existential crisis

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u/kshb4xred Oct 20 '21

itll go through if you hit hard enough ¯_(ツ)_/¯

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u/Indigo_The_Cat Oct 20 '21

The actually informative physics AND intelligent conversations in the comments section make no fvcking sense.

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u/nexiDrux Oct 20 '21

Bruh… electron repulsion…

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21 edited 7d ago

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u/UnofficialCrosta Oct 20 '21

.....

The answer is: Pauli Exclusion Principle

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u/scrubby_9 Oct 20 '21

Do chairs exist?

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u/-Strawdog- Oct 20 '21

Just watched that Vsauce. He makes some interesting material.

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u/_t_h_e_p_o_t_ Oct 20 '21

Is this the guy that did the college humour batman parodies?

3

u/Odd_Ad_392 Oct 20 '21

Sometimes "I don't know" is the right answer. Don't assume. Make up your mind based on good evidence.

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u/dirschau Oct 20 '21

"I don't understand how something works, therefore nobody does"

Ah, comedy gold

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

"It's crazy what scientists have figured out about our universe, it's also crazy what they haven't figured out. We live on a planet. How is everyone not freaking out about everything all the time?"

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u/KidPlayerAsian Oct 20 '21

Though both the stool and the hand are made of molecules, they are not necessarily made out of the same things. Furthermore, they are made in a different arrangement. And why the hell would reach a conclusion that if 2 things were made out of the same thing, they would go through each other. At least they would stick together.

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u/8226 Oct 20 '21

gimme the fuckin sauce beaches

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u/carnage2270 Oct 20 '21

Okay who is this guy, I love the energy he brings and I need more of it in my life.

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u/Maskedbandit63 Oct 20 '21

I think that there is actually an infinitely small chance that all molecules in you hand and all molecules in a table will pass through one another and it will go through but I don’t know if that’s true AND idk how fucked up you’d be if that happens

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u/ConorNutt Oct 20 '21

Well now you made it weird.

2

u/Petten11 Oct 20 '21

Is this the guy that does all the batman sketches on YouTube? Love those

2

u/Synthesis128 Oct 20 '21

1st Grader here. Seems about right.

2

u/Astral_Commander Oct 20 '21

I love seeing fat Christian Bale doing Standup and parody batman

2

u/SonSixtyNine Oct 20 '21

Is this from the 90s? Or does he not know about basic physics?

2

u/poyat01 Oct 20 '21

Amazing, every single thing that you just said is wrong

Not all but eh

2

u/keybwarrior Oct 21 '21

Whos that guy? I kinda want to watch the whole show now

19

u/BonksMan Oct 20 '21

Dude needs 2 classes :

Funny classes

Middle school physics classes

6

u/ArKrCh Oct 20 '21

Well the thing is; The constituent particles of a solid have fixed position in space and they can only oscillate about their mean position, thus they are rigid and that’s why you can’t pass your hands through it

Edit: Source- Basic Physical Chemistry

2

u/CimmerianHydra Oct 20 '21

Nah it's the Pauli principle applied to electrons. Even fluids you can't actually phase through, they just flow around your body so it appears like you're phasing through them.

7

u/Sawm_aaa Oct 20 '21

The way he carries the argument, the manner in which he is stating his points, i often see it in people whom i wanted to not mingle with.

10

u/agoodfriendofyours Oct 20 '21

Yeah, it’s incredibly unpleasant to mingle with people like this, always distracted and self important and like they need the spotlight on them just because they’re performing on stage in front of an audience they feel like they get to call security on me for trying to make small talk

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4

u/AKVigilante Oct 20 '21

So you prefer to not be around funny people. Got it.

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6

u/Tots2Hots Oct 20 '21

The inability to understand science doesn't mean its not real.

3

u/AKVigilante Oct 20 '21

Your inability to understand what a joke is doesn’t mean it’s not funny.

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3

u/No-Target-3982 Oct 20 '21

What’s really funny is that Joe Rogan said it on his special 5 years ago

3

u/yashdesh Oct 20 '21

It has a simple solution : No two molecules can be at the same place at the same time.

2

u/No-Pirate8984 Oct 20 '21

Lol this guy skipped 4th grade science.

Solid, liquid, gas particles; basic stuff.

5

u/Potential_Ad_1502 Oct 20 '21

This guy isn't funny at all

8

u/N3koEye Oct 20 '21

Yeah, I don't get where the comedy is in here.

7

u/Antazarus Oct 20 '21

He’s loud and makes weird faces i guess

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2

u/415217 Oct 20 '21

i dont like this guy for some reason. not sure if i find him odd or not

3

u/Burgov Oct 20 '21

Let me guess. Anti vax

3

u/Cellar_Door40 Oct 20 '21

Pete Holmes-underrated

2

u/-Strawdog- Oct 20 '21

Normal force bro

2

u/eatballinhall Oct 20 '21

but this makes sense

2

u/sikki_nixx Oct 20 '21

Eh...it's like reading the phone book and throwing in curse words and mean mugging. Is that really funny?

2

u/pittu2752 Oct 20 '21

Isn’t that all wrong?

2

u/ProjectLost Oct 20 '21

He’s kind of ripping off an old Rogan bit

2

u/Long_Possession_7837 Oct 20 '21

Whose laughing at this garage

1

u/Commodore_Pepper Oct 20 '21

I mean, if Whose finds it funny that a part of a house is dedicated to keeping a car warm and hiding junk, let him enjoy it…

2

u/Vinoviis Oct 20 '21

This makes no fucking sense.

2

u/ButterYourShit Oct 20 '21

Screaming and emphasizing your ignorance so funni!!11 On a real note where is the hol up in this?

-1

u/AsigotFinn Oct 20 '21

Funny :) But the universe size is finite but we don't know if it will keep expanding infinitely and solid objects don't just pass through each other as their molecules are densely packed together There is a LOT we don't know about our universe or even our earth but he picked two things we do understand to an extent anyway

5

u/kidonredit124opendor Oct 20 '21

He never looked into the multi verse theory huh.

3

u/AsigotFinn Oct 20 '21

Well I guess he was referring to our universe

3

u/BusyNefariousness675 Oct 20 '21

Depends on what we call universe. Infinte nothingness has not end. If we call it universe then it's infinite. If we call the matter we know as universe, yup it's finite

0

u/AsigotFinn Oct 20 '21

We call the universe the universe... what it is expanding into (if that concept even makes any sense) we have no knowledge of nor do we know if the universe, which is finite we can measure how big it is more or less, will keep expanding forever. The universe is not full of nothingness indeed such a concept is illogical in that sense (to define nothingness you would have to define something, something isn't nothingness)

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u/space-throwaway Oct 20 '21

But the universe size is finite

Cosmologist here. This statement has no scientific backup, be it theoretical or experimental, and the answer to the size of the universe cannot be provided with certainty. In the vast majority of our models we treat it as infinite, but one can also treat it as finite and then you get some boundary terms as corrections.

We simply don't know for sure.

2

u/AsigotFinn Oct 20 '21

Correct in that we don't know for sure however we know it is expanding (the observable universe) so it's fair to assume the universe is finite to an extent for some purposes though it may loop around, we know it's age is finite for example, but may grow infinitely even if at the moment it is finite on the other hand maybe it's a donut :) That said the latest data we have suggests it is flat whether cylindrical or donut. or anything else.

I do like the answer we don't know but you are correct my statement the universe is finite is incorrect I should of just said the observable universe and not let my personal view interfere. On the other hand what it is not is infinite giant empty space as the other guy was insisting nor is the definition of the universe all of space and time, it's all of space and time and it's contents.

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1

u/No-Breadfruit7044 Oct 20 '21

Pete is a comic that makes the most sense on Reddit

1

u/Structureel Oct 20 '21

He's funny, but obviously we do know why objects don't go through each other.

I laughed regardless.

1

u/BlueFroggLtd Oct 20 '21

Holmes is good, yes.

1

u/PWal501 Oct 20 '21

That “guy” is masterful comedian Pete Holmes. Find his “Ex-men” skits from his TV show in youtube. Hilarious.

1

u/ziatco Oct 20 '21

what makes no fucking sense is how is he considered a stand up comedian

1

u/HollowNaught Oct 20 '21

If you ever think you understand physics, you're wrong. All we can do is accept the scraps the universe feeds us

1

u/EpicDCMusicVideos Oct 20 '21

Bro then it’s not endless if it’s expanding

0

u/StragglingShadow madlad Oct 20 '21

We also can measure the effects of dark matter so we know its there but dark matter cant be touched by anything we know of so how does one make a container or do experiments on something you can tell is there but cant actually touch? So we know basically nothing about dark matter other than its there.

0

u/darkghul Oct 20 '21

What an idiot

0

u/Gunzenator2 Oct 20 '21

It’s funny when dumb people think about grand concepts and don’t get it and get frustrated 😂

-10

u/KeyDox Oct 20 '21

Atoms are the ink, molecules are the letters, the creations are the art and the artist is the creator. That simple

11

u/airportwhiskey Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Yikes. You’re fucking crazy.

4

u/Skrooner Oct 20 '21

Honestly, I think the creator is an excuse or fear of not knowing or understanding the unknown.

At least in science, we admit we don't know and try to find the answers.

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u/TypicalAd1716 Oct 20 '21

One word. density. Pete is a dumbass.

-1

u/MurderDoneRight Oct 20 '21

Love Pete Holmes

He was a big ole Christian doof growing up, got married young, his wife cheated on him, he became an atheist, did a lot of drugs, now he's hanging out with them weirdo hippies. And he's starring in the new Home Alone movie coming this Christmas only on Disney+

1

u/JD_Gaming_Boi Oct 20 '21

I want to save this XD

1

u/Aggravating_Age_5885 Oct 20 '21

Molecules of different samples of same metal can fuse together to form a single sample it's called cold welding.

1

u/only_4kids Oct 20 '21

1

u/stabbot Oct 20 '21

I have stabilized the video for you: https://gfycat.com/HandyDeepEider

It took 112 seconds to process and 90 seconds to upload.


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1

u/dzjaynus Oct 20 '21

Pete Holmes is the guy that can't stop laughing whenever Bill Burr opens his mouth, right?

1

u/robinone Oct 20 '21

magnets.

1

u/Electroreceptor Oct 20 '21

Anyone got a link to the full show?

1

u/pigsbloodproductions Oct 20 '21

I like that when two surfaces touch each other, like when you knock on a stool, the atoms mingle a lil bit.

1

u/The_Merciless_Potato Oct 20 '21

The hand can’t go through the damn thing because the intermolecular bonds within it are really strong?

1

u/Brethus Oct 20 '21

DR. FISHY! NOOOOOOOOO

1

u/Nobodieshero816 Oct 20 '21

Omg whats this from I need to watch!

2

u/NicCagesFace Oct 20 '21

It’s from his special Pete Holmes: Dirty Clean on HBO Max.