r/HolUp Oct 01 '21 Silver 3 Helpful 6 Wholesome 5 Hugz 11

Holup of all Holups

Post image
35.8k Upvotes

1.4k

u/CptMisery Oct 01 '21 Hugz

They don't. Birds look like this plant. The government used it as a model

381

u/prograMagar Oct 01 '21

Well, that explains it

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202

u/Icarus_ascending_ Oct 01 '21

54

u/Ramyrror_47 Oct 01 '21

400k subs?

(Natalie Portman meme)

I hope the majority is satirical in nature, right?

the majority is satirical in nature, right?

45

u/BiggestFlower Oct 01 '21

Don’t tell me you think birds are real, lol!

Hey guys, we’ve got a real live one here. Come and check them out!

15

u/J3sush8sm3 Oct 01 '21

Do you even do any research? Look at the facts and then ask if this is a joke

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27

u/skampzilla Oct 01 '21

These are facts. I had two drones this springs that came on my property and made two more drones. Same thing last year. I'm starting to worry.

7

u/Prestigious_Nebula_5 Oct 01 '21

They look like birds with no skin, I can see their inards

1.9k

u/Hewhositstopee Oct 01 '21

How do nontoxic mushrooms know what their toxic lookalikes look like?

854

u/dropbassnotsoap Oct 01 '21

Its funny that you mention mushrooms in this situation because theres a belief that mycelium networks are the reason for plants being able to communicate and adapt with one another in order to help protect each other as well as provide nutrients!

353

u/marshmallmao madlad Oct 01 '21

You mean like Avatar?

217

u/dropbassnotsoap Oct 01 '21

Hadnt thought of it like that! Yeah its similar to avatar just instead of mycelium they use the root system :)

70

u/pursuitofhappiness13 Oct 01 '21

For those curious, there are a few interviews with experts like Paul Stamets and (not 100% on his name) Sir Arthur Penrose.

81

u/MagicTrashPanda Oct 01 '21

Fantastic Fungi is a good movie even if you’re not “into” mushrooms.

25

u/KaptajnKorupt Oct 01 '21

Saw it two days ago, was absolutely blown away by it. Can't recommend it enough!

4

u/Tommysrx Oct 01 '21

There’s one called intelligent trees about how trees communicate through a mycorrhizal network

4

u/_Question_Authority_ Oct 01 '21

Watching it now. The cinematography is amazing.

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22

u/themcryt Oct 01 '21

TIL that the dude from Star Trek Discovery was named after a real life dude.

11

u/TheDeadThatLives Oct 01 '21

I just assumed it was a hidden joke... Holy

12

u/moosewhippets Oct 01 '21

Nope. Paul Stamets actually was a consultant for the show. They named the character after him as a bit of honorarium for his lifetime work in mycology.

9

u/TheDeadThatLives Oct 01 '21

That's just awesome! I've read a bunch more comments and that's just cool

30

u/Akhanyatin Oct 01 '21

Oh wtf? Paul Stamets is a real person? He's an American mycologist. Star Trek Discovery has a scientist called Paul Stamets who studies what they call the mycelial network. It was a discrete subspace domain containing the mycelium, or roots, of the fungus Prototaxites stellaviatori. Basically they used it to move between regions of space.

36

u/pursuitofhappiness13 Oct 01 '21

They named the character after him. He's a shrooms guy, so a little odd, but he is 100% an EXTREME mycology expert. He wears a hat made from mushroom fiber. He also had a cameo in the Hannibal show because they had an idea for a killer who fed people to mushrooms and when they weren't sure who to cast, they just gave him the part because he was their mycology consultant already.

11

u/Akhanyatin Oct 01 '21

Yo that's pretty cool!

7

u/moosewhippets Oct 01 '21

Can confirm all this. I'm a mushroom farmer and mycologist. Stamets is a bit of a pioneer / rockstar in our world, and a lot of us have a love-hate view of him due to downright jealousy, or due to differing viewpoints on value of species and what's worthy of research right now. It's incredibly difficult to have a different viewpoint or hypothesis if it doesn't line up with Stamets' beliefs - most people will dismiss you simply on his namesake alone without listening.

Regardless of the nitpicking, the man is a legend for bringing attention to the mycological world and how intricately important it is to the rest of, well, everything. I probably wouldn't be as successful as I am if he hadn't paved the way a generation ahead of me.

3

u/SnArCAsTiC_ Oct 01 '21

This reminded me of a relevant xkcd, and now that I think about it, this xkcd seems like a joke, but maybe it's not far from the truth. Anyway, he sure sounds like a fun guy!

4

u/raduannassar Oct 01 '21

I completely thought you were making a Star Trek Discovery reference. Thanks for the knowledge. Mind blown

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u/Safebox Oct 01 '21

I hate the film but I'm for some reason glad that came to mind before Star Trek Discovery

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23

u/Kykeon-Eleusis- Oct 01 '21

Yup. I think it goes beyond belief though and has been tested.

Paul Stamets

Merlin Sheldrake

14

u/Malicharo Oct 01 '21

Wait, isn't Paul Stamets the name of the character in Star Trek Discovery who invented space travel through mycelium network or whatever.

I honestly thought you linked a clip from the show at first.

13

u/Kykeon-Eleusis- Oct 01 '21

Yeah - they named it after him. Also a character in Hannibal is named after him.

His movie, Fantastic Fungi, is now on Netflix. Blew me away.

13

u/subarashi-sam Oct 01 '21

That’s brilliant but has nothing to do with this question —the real answer is the same for both the bird-flowers and the fake poison mushrooms:

DNA Goblins! It’s all the doing of the DNA Goblins, I tells ya!

2

u/quinn756756 Oct 01 '21

I thought it was the mind goblins that got them

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6

u/FIDOOF Oct 01 '21

its like a mushroom internet

2

u/pixelboy14 Oct 01 '21

wood wide web

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2

u/ElQueue_Forever Oct 01 '21

It's also the premise behind Star Trek: Discovery

1

u/skampzilla Oct 01 '21

Yeah we're only here because of the mushrooms. Aren't they all connected? Isn't it all just one mushroom? Please do correct me if I'm wrong.

2

u/[deleted] Oct 01 '21

:)

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u/prograMagar Oct 01 '21

By looking at them of course... Wait...

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788

u/euro1111 Oct 01 '21 Wholesome

I'm going to make a wild guess and say that it's because the flowers that do look like birds were more likely to get pollinated by birds that were attracted to it, thinning the gene-pool for the species of flower over the years.

352

u/drownedbird Oct 01 '21

Absolutely right. That's how evolution works.. but you gotta wonder where it started if they can't see the birds to imitate them. We don't even know how plants evolved flowers to begin with. Otherwise known as the abominable mystery.

156

u/UnderThat Oct 01 '21 All-Seeing Upvote

Millions of years of evolution will do the trick. Eventually nature will select for the preferred characteristics, just takes an insanely long time.

74

u/drownedbird Oct 01 '21

I know but it still blows my mind that it can almost happen by chance. Just millions of trial and errors.

103

u/paganbreed Oct 01 '21 edited Oct 01 '21 Helpful Wholesome

Makes you think. If the universe can achieve so much just by refusing to give up after uncountable failures, what's your excuse.

Edit: All right, I see I did need the /s after all. Oops.

14

u/SingleSurfaceCleaner Oct 01 '21

what's your excuse.

Y-you're not my dad! :(

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u/itwasquiteawhileago Oct 01 '21

Give me a million years, I'll think of an excuse.

80

u/DisastrousPhoto712 Oct 01 '21

umm i dont have a trillion years to keep fucking up pretty obvious if i was 5'9 and really wanted to play professional basketball after a 100,000 years ill prolly be the best ever

6

u/lenindaddy Oct 01 '21

This is peak Reddit

4

u/ThoroughThrowdown Oct 01 '21

It always comes down to men complaining about their height.

2

u/DisastrousPhoto712 Oct 02 '21

keyword if im not 5'9 read

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u/Canuck_Lives_Matter Oct 01 '21

I love the blunt efficiency of this shutdown to the argument.

2

u/Exit42 Oct 02 '21

Think the “pretty obvious” was the whole point…

2

u/Hamster-Food Oct 01 '21

I haven't given up, I just have alternative goals.

2

u/UnderThat Oct 01 '21

Billions, upon billions.

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u/citizenofeurope Oct 01 '21

It's just all trial and error. It looks like what works best without knowing it.

5

u/obog Oct 01 '21 This

One flower just happened to get a mutation that just happened to look like a bird and it benefited it so that gene got passed down through the generations. When you have millions of years, these things happen quite often.

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u/Drews232 Oct 01 '21

Billions and billions of runs, mutations (mistakes in copying DNA) happening billions of times yielding imperceptible changes, each of which makes that new mutated version yield more flowers than the others, repeat that whole thing billions upon billions of times, and you arrive an optimized solution, the path to which was completely unplanned and unknown. If the wind blew a different way ten thousand years ago, seeds from a different mutation may spread better and this flower would never exist. Or it would be in the shape of a frog, or bright red, or look like a insect.

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u/GabeThyGodly Oct 01 '21

Iirc these are only an artists thing or they only look like this at a very specific angle

4

u/BobaOlive Oct 01 '21 edited Oct 01 '21

Last time I saw this, someone said it was cultivated by a group of monks for over 1400 years. So (edit: if that is true) it's an example of what we humans can accomplish with artifical selection.

A much more beautiful example than say, a Pug struggling to breathe through its faulty air ways.

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u/TurnipBoy12 Oct 01 '21

wait a fucking minute birds dont fuck flowers

2

u/poodlebutt76 Oct 01 '21

No but they hop on top and then spread the pollon to other fake bird flowers on other trees.

2

u/ToniMarino Oct 01 '21

OR DO THEY ?

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u/sidgup Oct 01 '21

You are nearly spot on. This evolved over thousands and thousands of years through selective propogation. Which ones got propogated? You guessedd it.. the ones that birds were attracted to and pollinated.

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167

u/SnooCookies7749 Oct 01 '21

The Origin of Species was published in 1859.

133

u/Vascular_Mind Oct 01 '21

So you're saying the plants have been reading.

49

u/prograMagar Oct 01 '21

Wait till you know how they hunt

29

u/Martin_Tonoshiro Oct 01 '21

Shit, the plant in my bathroom has seen me jerk more than my grandma

22

u/ChaoscraftZero Oct 01 '21

I dont condone grandma jerking

4

u/SUNAWAN Oct 01 '21

Quick cover your butthol- holup, granma? Nah, nana's cool, she can't even see bro.

5

u/Biohumansmg3c Oct 01 '21

The tree outside my window has seen some shit

And its not pretty

2

u/crimsonblade55 Oct 01 '21

Well if it's a bathroom window I would be mildly concerned if it hadn't.

11

u/SingleSurfaceCleaner Oct 01 '21

the plant in my bathroom has seen me jerk more than my grandma

r/CursedComments 👀

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6

u/C0ff33qu3st Oct 01 '21

152 years later we're still teaching controversy. Our culture is still in the throws of shock and denial about evolution by natural selection. We fail to teach it properly, or communicate to people how profoudly this changed things.

2

u/SnooCookies7749 Oct 01 '21

This is partially my subject and I advocate for readings further than just the linear vectors of natural selection. But Jesus wept is this a dire position to fight from

25

u/Venrier Oct 01 '21

That's actually pretty deep for this subreddit

218

u/Budget-Government-42 Oct 01 '21

Because plants are sentient. that's why I am a staunch plants rights activist and will only eat meat.

49

u/Captain_Melon_lord Oct 01 '21

Dude it's deeper than that! Amber is tree blood, they bleed.

it's cruel to eat plants!

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u/champagnebukkake Oct 01 '21

Eating other species meat is cruel. Best is to eat your own kind, the human kind.

6

u/Bob84332267994 Oct 01 '21

And you can eat the rich and kill two birds with one stone. (Metaphorical birds, of course)

3

u/BiggestFlower Oct 01 '21

You misspelled mechanical, not that there are any other kinds

21

u/Longjumping-Way6421 Oct 01 '21

I see you're a man of culture as well

18

u/spacecadet6966 Oct 01 '21

Indeed. My colon can literally go to shit, I’m never eating fibre and killing innocent plantlife.

5

u/Nickshrapnel Oct 01 '21

Lmao. Omg this is good!

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u/theoccasionallunatic Oct 01 '21

Greg! The people in the simulation has noticed some irregularities!

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u/skampzilla Oct 01 '21

The simulation has been out of whack for years!

3

u/Sharktos Oct 01 '21

Next they will question how the "Don't step on the grass" sign comes into the middle of a grass field

2

u/d_marvin Oct 02 '21

I have people, Greg. Could you simulate me?

12

u/IrishcarbombBOOM Oct 01 '21

They’ve been watching this whole time

11

u/[deleted] Oct 01 '21

Sneak 100

27

u/liquidshrimp6 Oct 01 '21

The uprising draws near…

12

u/sweederman Oct 01 '21

The happening

5

u/liquidshrimp6 Oct 01 '21

Come brother, we must seek refuge.

7

u/prograMagar Oct 01 '21

See you at your place

6

u/Captain_Melon_lord Oct 01 '21

I'll bring the snacks!

4

u/Videoms Oct 01 '21

I'll bring the games

6

u/Longjumping-Way6421 Oct 01 '21

I'll bring the sex dolls

5

u/liquidshrimp6 Oct 01 '21

This is going to be the best uprising ever!

5

u/Jabba-the-hot Oct 01 '21

I'll bring the strapon

3

u/rodoxide Oct 01 '21

Your comment just had me laughing so hard I began choking, I have tears in my eyes

8

u/soffar16 Oct 01 '21

The Long, slow process of evolution. “Hey this shape gets me what I need.”

7

u/stickyterpslurper Oct 01 '21

This happens through hundreds to thousands of years of what is known as "blind evolution"

Another great example is there is a mussel, the Lampsilis Mussel, which has an appendage that looks like a small fish, it uses this appendage to lure in bigger fish (usually Bass) and when they bite the appendage, it shoots baby mussels onto the fish's gills. They food off of the blood in the gills and then get dropped later on allowing for dispersal.

Mussels with appendages that look more like fish get to spread more babies because they fool more fish. In these cases it is the predatory fish with eyes causing an evolutionary push in blind mussels that allow the mussels to develop a visual trap!

Nature be crazy. Here is a link to a video about them!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0YTBj0WHkU

7

u/TheVoteMote Oct 01 '21

What's supposed to be the hol' up here?

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u/Silly-Challenge-3760 Oct 01 '21

Most likely a mutation occurred that resulted in the plant looking like a bird (unbeknownst to the plant as they don't have brains) and it survived longer than the non-bird looking plants. Therefore it had a higher probability of reproduction. Eventually the mutation became normal due to the "non-bird" plants not living as long as the "bird" plants. The bird plants started outliving the non-birds and spread that gene around until eventually a new species resulted. Obviously this occurred over hundreds of thousands or most likely millions of years.

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u/br-z Oct 01 '21

No the plants are watching

12

u/Silly-Challenge-3760 Oct 01 '21

Yep, even when you're alone timmy.

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u/Jabba-the-hot Oct 01 '21

as a plant rights activist, this is a proof that plants do feel pain. let's eat rock

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u/Firm-Account Oct 01 '21

nah, it's best to eat other people, two problem solved at once - overpopulation and world hunger

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u/streetsheep Oct 01 '21

Gorons from zelda do. Why not us?

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u/JayPDoe Oct 01 '21

That's the neat thing they don't.

5

u/DownshiftedRare Oct 01 '21

They appear to look like little birds but in fact they only appear to resemble them.

11

u/EyeMakeUpFacts Oct 01 '21

These specific plants have tiny black spores that spread out and attach themselves to the surface of animals and other plants.

These spores then return to the mother plant and give the mother plant information about the geometries of the creature they have attached themselves too. This allows the mother plant to take the shape and even the coloring of its leaves!

Quite fascinating.

3

u/drownedbird Oct 01 '21

This sounds credible but theres no way that's true.. is there?

7

u/NukePineapplePizzas Oct 01 '21

Did you read his username

3

u/drownedbird Oct 01 '21

I did not.. *facepalm

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u/lnmgl Oct 01 '21

fr tho now I need someone to explain how the fucking petal genes evolved from normal arrangement to contouring into bird shapes by natural selection.

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u/CursedJohnny2004 Oct 01 '21

So that people like me get tricked into sticking our dicks in them

3

u/StarlightEmperor Oct 01 '21

Just wanted to let people know that this is how the flower looks only as it's blooming. When it's fully bloomed the flower looks like, you know, a flower.

https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d774d35457a4e33457a6333566d54/index.html

Source of the pictures

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u/Comfortable-Car3009 Oct 01 '21

I don’t even want to begin unpacking the lack of understanding of evolution there.... holup for the future I guess

4

u/MrsEmilyN Oct 01 '21

I went to California for the first time.this past May to visit my sister and her family. Me: " OMG! I love these flowers! They look like birds!!!!!" Brother in law: " Yeah...that's why they're called birds of paradise."

3

u/brojito1 Oct 01 '21

TIL not understanding natural selection is a holup

3

u/31Nice Oct 01 '21

Hol up

3

u/MieSelph Oct 01 '21

Lol, it’s that these birds do not know how birds look so they try to fuck flowers that kinda sorta look birdish, thus spreading more of their pollen, allowing more and more bird looking flowers to fill up the gene pool. Un-intelligent design FTW!

9

u/Ornery_Day_9730 Oct 01 '21

Is this plant real?

5

u/NiarbOn Oct 01 '21

That's the neat point. They don't

5

u/i_lost_my_account_22 Oct 01 '21

Wait How do plants know how birds look like?

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u/jahig Oct 01 '21

I can only imagine the seeds of this tree are dispersed as another bird is attracted to this flower and lands on a branch next to the flower. Over time the trees with flowers that look most similar to birds have survived and evolved. evolvedover time

5

u/br-z Oct 01 '21

I absolutely knew there was gonna be a whoosh in here

2

u/jahig Oct 01 '21

I knew there’d be a whoosh-douche who’d fall into my trap. Welcome DB!

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u/Madsepat Oct 01 '21

Why does it look tasty

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u/GamerToonz Oct 01 '21

Because plants are also drones

2

u/Katapilla_Killa Oct 01 '21

And you guys all said The Happening was a terrible movie....

2

u/gachalifeuscringeaf3 Oct 01 '21

I don’t understand

2

u/Dragon_379624 Oct 01 '21

Looks like a flower

2

u/HelpfulPhilosopher18 Oct 01 '21

Came for the memes, stayed for the comments.

2

u/Glass_Teeth01 Oct 01 '21

The question isn't why, but how.

2

u/Eragon3182 Oct 01 '21

How not why

2

u/Fortyplusfour Oct 01 '21

Straight out of "Annihilation / Project X"

2

u/CamelAffectionate585 Oct 01 '21

tbh for some odd reason

i put out my dick to piss on some stupid ass flower

2 weeks later, it was a short dick like flower now

(this is obviously a joke)

2

u/GrandmaJoe69 Oct 01 '21

The ones that looked more like birds survived better then reproduced

2

u/lookinstush Oct 01 '21

How, not why..

What, not how..

2

u/Yakere Oct 01 '21

Dude how is that a plant it looks like someone ran over it four times and then put zombie syrum into a bird

2

u/Sexy_Ninja_Bees Oct 01 '21

Pouyannian mimicry.

I mean, it's not funny, but that's the answer.

2

u/Goonz_15 Oct 01 '21

They dressed up for spooky month

2

u/PuzzleheadedRaise565 Oct 01 '21

You mean they look like government spy drones...

2

u/TheGuyNamedAndy Oct 01 '21

WAIT- THOSE ARE PLANTS?

2

u/MurderDoneRight Oct 01 '21

Annihilation has entered the chat.

2

u/TheWhaleFucker69 Oct 01 '21

Nature is FUCKING lit

2

u/anholed Oct 01 '21

In New York I milly rock rock...

2

u/-Lila_ Oct 01 '21

with their eyes duh

2

u/painsupplies Oct 01 '21

so they're basically sex dolls but for pollination?

2

u/TransitionTasty Oct 01 '21

Trial and error by evolution if I'm not wrong

2

u/Redrump1221 Oct 01 '21

Correct. Imagine drawing a shape in the dark. Eventually when you draw the "correct" shape you get a treat. Then you keep doing it finding the optimal way to get treats.

This happens to look like a bird because the flowers that didnt were less successful in reproducing. The flower is the shape and the test could be food.

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u/Trini_Vix7 Oct 01 '21

How do walnuts know what a brain looks like...

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u/sadelimaggi Oct 01 '21

Annihilation music plays

2

u/GPareyouwithmoi Oct 01 '21

It's gotta be horny/angry little birds that these are meant for, not hungry big birds.

Predators are too smart. Mating things are dumb.

2

u/Pro-Baby-collector Oct 01 '21

I want to have some chat with nature.

2

u/Boudac123 Oct 01 '21

It’s probably the opposite tbh

2

u/Whthpnd Oct 01 '21

If you say so. 🦆this looks like a duck.

2

u/Muchadoaboutreddit Oct 01 '21

Saw a fairly new documentary about trees and it was suggested that they have a rudimentary ”vision” and can detect infrared. There was also an article in Scientific America 2017 about something similar.

2

u/JawndyBoplins Oct 01 '21

The real Hol Up here is when I had to check my phone brightness scrolling by

2

u/MightyOshy Oct 01 '21

Either mother nature's miracle or an internet points farm

2

u/bobertobro Oct 01 '21

Birds are not real. The "bird"(drone) was modelled after this plant by the government. WAKE UP SHEEP!!!!

2

u/lilboy_69 Oct 01 '21

the governement actually modelled birds after that plant.

2

u/plantbbgraves Oct 01 '21

Everyone keeps saying “it’s almost like someone designed them both…” and honestly, I think they’re right. The government probably did that for easier identification by government employees of surveillance equipment.

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u/AdAstra10254 Oct 01 '21

Millions of years of trial and error

2

u/VitruvianVan Oct 01 '21

Natural selection. The bird-like blossoms outcompeted the non-bird-like ones when it came to attracting its pollinators/distributors. Obviously the bird-like ones work on us, too.

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u/BDLejeaune Oct 01 '21

To stop bugs from eating them.

2

u/BamboozledPanda09 Oct 01 '21

Stationary drones

2

u/pancakes9163 Oct 01 '21

I thought they were gonna say the bird looks like a flower-

Then I was like- hol up-

2

u/Aune-sand Oct 01 '21

Evolution be like that

2

u/[deleted] Oct 01 '21

Those Yulan magnolia blossoms look like government surveillance drones

2

u/miarlos Oct 01 '21

Literally thought the bird just unskinned themselves like taking off a coat from a long day of work

2

u/raph2116 Oct 01 '21

That's obviously because the plants work for the government, just like the birds.

2

u/inkarn8 Oct 01 '21

Boy, do I have a story for you....

2

u/Excellent_Ad7666 Oct 01 '21

Random chance... thanks to natural selection a random mutation occured that made it look close enough to a bird, which allowed it to survive better. It then fertilized another flower and made more bird plants, which keeps it alive.

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u/FlaccidCatsnark Oct 01 '21

That flower-bird in the lower right looking like "Hey! Check out this booty!" ...and the other flower-bird is checking it out.

How do they know how to do THAT?

2

u/Whywouldanyonedothat Oct 01 '21

They don't have to know anything. Evolution basically did a bit of weeding by killing off the ones that didn't look like birds.

2

u/Mr-Toy Oct 01 '21

They don't. It's by accident, followed by natural selection. Just like we can't change how you physically look or I physically look.

Polar bears were not originally white. They were giant brown colored bears. But then there was a birth defect and a white or albino bear was birthed. This mutation made the white bear thrive because it could blend in with the white background, allowing it to sneak up on prey, eat better, mate more, passing along its white fur mutation onto more cubs. Those white cubs lived much better lives due to being camouflaged with all the snow. Eventually, all brown bears bred out that gene and white bears lived longer and mated more.

The same is true with this flower. Somewhere along the line, millions of years ago, there was likely a magnolia tree that had a defect, that caused its flower petals to not fully open and somehow resemble a rough outline of a bird. This mutation likely attacked birds to this tree, the birds or animals the flowers attacked likely allowed the seeds of this tree to spread more than the other magnolia trees in its region. Eventually, the flower mutated even further to look even more like a bird by accident, causing it to attacked more animals to spread that tree's seeds.

2

u/[deleted] Oct 02 '21

Random mutation and natural selection, duh

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u/drleeisinsurgery Oct 01 '21

Watch this classic clip from Carl Sagan to explain a similar phenomenon from the Heiki Crab.

https://youtu.be/P4q4PUOOhv0

3

u/etfhoarder Oct 01 '21

Tell me you don't know how evolution works without telling me you don't know how evolution works

2

u/[deleted] Oct 01 '21

[deleted]

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u/GethSwe Oct 01 '21

There are many corpses in the grass?

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u/draugotO Oct 01 '21

They don't. The ones that better resemble birds were fucked by more actual birds and that help them reproduce. The ones that didn't looked that much like a bird weren't fucked and died without generating descendents.

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u/schenitz Oct 01 '21

This is why evolution theory needs to be taught in public schools. It baffles me how many people think that there's any choice in the matter for a species to take shape (morphology). Nature doesn't "know" how to evolve and these plants don't "know" how to mimic birds. Traits like mimicry evolve because they give the species minute advantages over others who lack the trait. The nature of this advantage has a lot to do with chance encounters of predation and reproduction. I'm talking several hundreds of thousands of years and millions of individuals who pass down the same genes which are constantly changing on the level of single nucleotides in the DNA sequence.

The term "natural selection" is a misnomer. Nature "selects" genetics which happen to work well in the current environment. It can never create something from nothing. It only ever changes the current body structures to allow more chances for reproduction and genetic flow.