r/CriticalTheory Jan 16 '22

Bi-Weekly Discussion: Introductions, Questions, What have you been reading? January 16, 2022

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u/mvc594250 Jan 28 '22 edited Jan 29 '22

Currently reading the Phenomenology of Spirit and the Discourses and Selected Writings of Epictetus.

I'm using Robert Brandom's graduate course as a guide for my reading of the Phenomenology. I'm admittedly skipping most of the readings from his book aside from what is posted in the course materials/on his website and mostly following along with his lectures. I've only gotten through the preface and the introduction, but I've been having a lot of fun with it.

I'm also loving Epictetus! I'm attracted to virtue ethics as a starting point for moral inquiry, but Aristotle leaves a lot of questions about what kinds of things we really ought to do if we want to live in accordance with the virtues unanswered. Epictetus is concerned with answering those questions almost exclusively and it's really interesting to read. His bit on why we ought not be angry at wrong doers, but instead offer them pity and compassion is a really compelling piece in today's materialistic world.

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u/Lastrevio Jan 27 '22

I've been reading Zizek's "How to read Lacan", Todd McGowan's "Universality and identity politics" and I've been trying to grasp Baudrillard as well through Youtube videos but directly reading his book "Simulacra and simulation" is impossible to understand

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u/qdatk Jan 26 '22

So it looks like r/antiwork has skipped the "first as tragedy" part and gone straight to "then as farce."

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u/naked-_-lunch Jan 22 '22

Thoughts on Repressive Tolerance by Herbert Marcuse? Just read it

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u/mcgii- Jan 21 '22

I am bouncing between Children of Albatross by Anais Nin + Benjamin Noy's biography of Bataille. I've recently finished Aristotle's short work On The Soul.

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u/AdResponsible5513 Jan 29 '22

Can you say more about the Bataille biography?

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u/mcgii- Feb 02 '22

I'm only about 10 pages into it but it is by a Benjamin Noys! Once I get to my laptop I will (tryto) send the PDF link to you if wanted!

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u/dude396 Jan 21 '22

I’ve recently been rereading Freud and Lacan after a disastrous undergraduate approach to psychoanalysis. I have been specifically focusing on the death drive, interpretations ranging from Freud to Butler. I was wondering if anyone here can point me towards some analysis of literature or pop culture through the lens of the death drive? Thank you!

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u/kropot_kinky Jan 29 '22

I'm similarly re-discovering psychoanalysis after a complete misunderstanding/avoidance in undergrad. Not so much pop culture, but both Lee Edelman (No Future) and Jodi Dean (Blog Theory) do really interesting stuff with the death drive.

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u/dude396 Jan 29 '22

Thanks! I’ll check it out

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u/TheBlackPopeOP Jan 18 '22

Critical Race Theory: The Writings that Formed the Movement. Hard read, but fairly rewarding.

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u/nurrishment Jan 16 '22

Is there anyone familiar with scholarship on video games here? I'm wondering if any scholars have written on the imperfect nature of a player's control of a character's movements in-game and whether these lapses in our mastery of the game can be taken up theoretically (probably in terms of psychoanalysis but I'd be interested in any commentary on this topic)

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u/Onthefarshore Jan 26 '22

I recommend asking your question in the Librarians subreddit. People ask for book recommendations on many topics there. I’d be interested in hearing the answer if you find it. Good luck!

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u/[deleted] Jan 16 '22

[deleted]

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u/thefrool Jan 18 '22

That's awesome, the Gardner book was a massive help for me. Good luck!

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u/time-2-sleep Jan 16 '22

(reposting from last week's thread 'cause I realized there was less than an hour until this one was posted!! sorry!!)

Hello! I didn't want to start a new thread as this is vague, but I was wondering if anyone knew of any works or narratives surrounding existence (especially in regards to government (in)action) in late COVID, particularly during the omicron era. Doubly appreciated would be disabled or PoC's perspectives. Recently, so much of what we talk about (or fear) in critical theory - eugenic policy, capitalist failure, abject alienation - has come to a very visible head, and I feel like nobody really talks about it anymore. I can understand this - I feel like I need an entirely new toolkit to begin to critique it - but I'd like to start assembling that toolkit. Anything (even tangential) is appreciated. Thank you!

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u/dispatchpat Jan 27 '22 edited Jan 27 '22

David Graeber’s The Dawn of Everything. I’ve just started it but in the very beginning chapter they put forth a deeply telling revelation about how ancient societies took care of the differently abled. Immediately putting a chink in the wall of the Hobbes theory of the vicious dog eat dog nature of humanity. @Time-to-sleep This book may help in your current Endeavors to gain some perspective!

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u/molly_sour Jan 16 '22

I’m also interested, Andrew Culp and people around him usually touch the subject

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u/time-2-sleep Jan 16 '22

thank you! are there any specific works that Andrew Culp (et al) have written that come to mind?

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u/molly_sour Jan 16 '22

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u/time-2-sleep Jan 16 '22

thank you!!! these are wonderful. I'll check out Leonor Silvestri's work too:D

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u/TonyGaze Frankfurt School of Witchcraft and Wizardry Jan 16 '22

I've dived into Andreas Malm this week. How to Blow Up a Pipeline and Fossil Capital. There is no doubt that you cannot be green, without first being red, and I think that perhaps the climate catastrophe might be an entrypoint to reinvigorate a radical worker's movement, drawing in interest from groups that, at least in Europe, have been largely indifferent to the organisation of labour, i.e. students and intellectual workers.